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Old 09-05-2016, 08:14 AM   #101
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The screws come out of those pretty easy to....I have a ready supply waiting in my bilge...
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Old 09-05-2016, 08:15 AM   #102
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Believe my Magnum Energy inverter charger uses that type of terminal block (post #99) for the AC connections.

Ted
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Old 09-05-2016, 08:16 AM   #103
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Old 09-05-2016, 08:20 AM   #104
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Here is an example of the simple, no plate, crush the cable with a set screw fuse block
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Old 09-05-2016, 08:22 AM   #105
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Quote:
Originally Posted by O C Diver View Post
Believe my Magnum Energy inverter charger uses that type of terminal block (post #99) for the AC connections.

Ted
The are commonly used for a lot of applications.

Older GBs use a lot of them. But they are black in color.
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Old 09-05-2016, 08:39 AM   #106
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"There are wire connections on devices with little holes exactly big enough to slip the properly sizes wire into. 90 degrees to that is a screw, with no terminal plate and are straight threaded and can be backed all the way out. These are not what ABYC wants but do come on approved, marine grade components."

The ABYC electrical standards apply to the AC and DC SYSTEMS on boats. They do not apply to equipment and components. These type of terminal strips are permitted in components and equipment. There are some component/equipment specific standards as well.
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Old 09-05-2016, 08:47 AM   #107
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"There are wire connections on devices with little holes exactly big enough to slip the properly sizes wire into. 90 degrees to that is a screw, with no terminal plate and are straight threaded and can be backed all the way out. These are not what ABYC wants but do come on approved, marine grade components."

The ABYC electrical standards apply to the AC and DC SYSTEMS on boats. They do not apply to equipment and components. These type of terminal strips are permitted in components and equipment. There are some component/equipment specific standards as well.
They are not "in" Equipment or components....they are how you attach them to your wiring.

If not required for 2/0 connection to a fuse block or 6 ga wire to a battery charger...then isn't requiring fancy crush plates and captive terminal ends some place else on a boat little odd?
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Old 09-05-2016, 08:57 AM   #108
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those European style blocks are for use with low voltage application only,usually control wiring.You find them mostly in hvac control boards,etc.I have not seen them in other systems,but that is not to say that the European standards run adjacent to ul standards(which the abyc follows).I do not believe that they are rated for high voltage(over 55 volts) applications,but not sure.The electrical industry recently(not marine)has recently moved to pressure release connections (mostly in lighting)as a quick connect solution,and they are approved for 300 volt connections.An ever evolving industry that is tough to keep with.
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Old 09-05-2016, 09:28 AM   #109
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Actually after further investigation,the European blocks are approved up to 27 amps,600v insulation rating,so they are high voltage approved.As I stated,I personally haven't seen them in any other application besides low voltage uses,that might change.American manufacturers are slow to adapt European standards.
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Old 09-05-2016, 10:02 AM   #110
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Just to be clear, 600v is not high voltage.
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Old 09-05-2016, 10:24 AM   #111
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just to be clear,the codebooks refer to anything over 55 volts as high voltage,anything over 600 volts is high tension.You stand corrected.
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Old 09-05-2016, 10:36 AM   #112
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I have no idea what you guys are talking about. No one mentioned terminal boards....these are external wire connections or the simple ends to a fuse block.

There are wire connections on devices with little holes exactly big enough to slip the properly sizes wire into. 90 degrees to that is a screw, with no terminal plate and are straight threaded and can be backed all the way out. These are not what ABYC wants but do come on approved, marine grade components.

A good example of something similar is a European terminal block.
AKA Euro Strip...
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Old 09-05-2016, 10:41 AM   #113
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Bob,my masters electrician license certifies me to work up to 600volt systems,anything above that requires a high tension certification,which I do not possess,never had the need.Anything under 55 volts,requires a low voltage installer certification,i.e.burglar alarms,etc. Manufacturers refer to high voltage as greater than 1000 volts for manufacturing purposes.Two different beasts.
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Old 09-05-2016, 11:18 AM   #114
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I only used the euro strip as an example of construction...

Not size, voltage, or use...only how more than I would think manufacturers expect you to fasten relatively large DC cables which if I remember BoatUS reports is a problem with fires.
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Old 09-05-2016, 11:26 AM   #115
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They don't make those blocks rated for that kind of amperage.When you get into higher amperage,then you are required to use copper busbars,with all the rules that apply to them such as crossectional area,must be tapped and threaded,thickness,etc.
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Old 09-05-2016, 11:34 AM   #116
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Got news for you...that fuse block is a screw in only and rated for 400 amps.

I believe it is a class t fuse holder for inverters. The identical construction on my battery charger is 75 amps, but the same design, one wire larger is on the 100 amp charger. All to common on equipment I have come across.

Not sure what "rules" you are talking about...not sure even ABYC suggests what you are saying.
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Old 09-05-2016, 11:38 AM   #117
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Have we moved on from terminal blocks to fuse blocks?Fuse blocks are required to be manufactured under the same requirements as busbars,hence the higher amperage ratings
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Old 09-05-2016, 11:44 AM   #118
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The point has really been about crush connections back to FFs post on tinning the end of wires either being good or bad.

Because equipment being manufactured and sold, but not in compliance with ABYC theory requiring crush plates...then would tinning the ends be good or bad?
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Old 09-05-2016, 11:51 AM   #119
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personnaly,I would tin.without the plates,stranded wire has a tendency to mushroom,leaving strands without contact.This reduces the circular mil rating for the wire,derating its ampacity.But that is me,as there are many different opinions.I single screw attachment point is not even ul rated for stranded wire.Stakons are my first choice,but even with those,you need the correct tool with the correct dies.The hd crimpers are not a good choice,ratchet crimpers are.
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Old 09-05-2016, 11:54 AM   #120
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Thus why I continued the thread on FF's post that was suggested to not be in compliance with ABYC...well...if the equipment you are connecting to might require a bit of outside the box thinking...then so be it.
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