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Old 09-03-2016, 10:34 AM   #21
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shore power cord problems

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Originally Posted by seattleboatguy View Post
How often do you apply this grease?

I apply it periodically to the cord that I use when traveling. For my home cord, I reapply it any time I remove my cord from the dock pedestal. Since I have to use an adaptor on my 30 amp cord since I have a 50/120 plug on the boat, I use the grease on that connection as well. It is cheap and easy to apply. I keep it I. A drawer on the boat that is easy to get at so I don't have to go hunting for it.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/CRC-3-3-o...5105/203283187

FWIW, I think that for 30amp services, the Smartplug is a great investment.
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Old 09-03-2016, 10:35 AM   #22
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Dielectric grease is an insulator, non-conductive... Yes, it will keep air out of the joint but won't pass electricity. Better choice would be a conductive grease.
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Old 09-03-2016, 10:43 AM   #23
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Newer boats have a breaker right after next to the boats shore power out let between the out let and the main panel selector switch to protect the cord and out let. Older boats do not have the breaker. We updated our electrical with a smart plug for addition safety.
I don't understand the theory behind this. If you have a 30 amp breaker next to the shore power outlet, and then another 30 amp breaker a few feet away on the main panel, it would seem kind of redundant to me. Why do the newer boats have both?
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Old 09-03-2016, 10:44 AM   #24
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I use Kopr-Shield, a conductive grease. But you must be very judicious with it. It is conductive and you can create a short circuit if you get sloppy with it. With our hull inlets, we can leave the cords attached. I put Kopr-Shield on the boat end, screw down tight on the locking ring and check for temperature rise anytime I see I have a heavy load. I put Kopr-Shield on the plug on the shore end as needed, depending upon the power post at today's marina.


CP8-TB Thomas & Betts Kopr-Shield Compound, 8-Oz
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Old 09-03-2016, 10:46 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by O C Diver View Post
Before you install the new AC, You really need to check and maybe replace wire and breaker between the dead 30 amp receptacle and the AC unit. If you cooked the receptacle and power wires within the AC, good chance there is overload damage elsewhere.

Ted
That's a good thought. I'll take a close look at the entire wire run between the shore power connector and the new a/c.
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Old 09-03-2016, 10:52 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by seattleboatguy View Post
I don't understand the theory behind this. If you have a 30 amp breaker next to the shore power outlet, and then another 30 amp breaker a few feet away on the main panel, it would seem kind of redundant to me. Why do the newer boats have both?
Not sure all newer boats have them....but but I think newer boats conforming with ABYC suggestions need to have a breaker within so many feet of the boat power inlet....10 feet rings a bell....

So if the main panel is too far away, there is a breaker right next to it...and really new boats mave have the new whole boat ground fault system (ELCI ?) right there.
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Old 09-03-2016, 10:53 AM   #27
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Dielectric grease is an insulator, non-conductive... Yes, it will keep air out of the joint but won't pass electricity. Better choice would be a conductive grease.
Oh dear. Now, an electrical novice like myself has to choose between dielectric grease and conductive grease? It reminds me of my sailboat days, when I had to choose between a dozen different ideas of what was the "proper" way to establish the ground plane for my new single sideband radio.
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Old 09-03-2016, 10:55 AM   #28
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This is an ABYC requirement that there be overcurrent protection which breaks both the hot and the neutral conductors,and be located within 10 feet of the hull inlet.

If the inlet is near the panel, then the panel breakers suffice. On most boats it is more than 10 feet from the inlet to the main distribution panel.
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Old 09-03-2016, 10:57 AM   #29
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Is there any information comparing the EEL plug to the Smart Plug? Casual observation shows more EEL Plugs around our local docks than Smart Plugs. They seem easier to use as you don't need to replace the boat or power post plugs. Thoughts?
The only difference in the EEL is the grip clamps or locking mechanism to attempt to hold the plug into the socket. It is still a NEMA 30A plug. In my experience the EEL is that it is not much of an improvement, other than convenience factor, in holding the plug in place over the threaded rings. Easier & more convenient to lock, sure, better not really...
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Old 09-03-2016, 11:31 AM   #30
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Oh dear. Now, an electrical novice like myself has to choose between dielectric grease and conductive grease? It reminds me of my sailboat days, when I had to choose between a dozen different ideas of what was the "proper" way to establish the ground plane for my new single sideband radio.
Don't use either.

Why would you use one grease that could inhibit conductivity or one that can cause a short because is so conductve?

Just use Boeshield or something like it and rest easy.
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Old 09-03-2016, 11:35 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by seattleboatguy View Post
Oh dear. Now, an electrical novice like myself has to choose between dielectric grease and conductive grease? It reminds me of my sailboat days, when I had to choose between a dozen different ideas of what was the "proper" way to establish the ground plane for my new single sideband radio.
A conductive grease will work fine, but I like to apply a lot of the grease to eliminate water intrusion. With a conductive grease you have be very careful, as tadhana said, to make sure that the grease is completely inside the plug slots or you can have a short.

A conductive grease increases the contact area for the plug. That is a good thing and it also prevents water intrusion. There are places where a conductive grease would be superior to a dielectric grease, such as bus bars or battery terminals. However, I wouldn't personally be comfortable using it in any place where there is both a positive and negative or ground connection in close proximity.

Marinco recommends dielectric grease for its plugs for what its worth.

I can find all kinds of ways to screw things up. For me, keeping just a can of dielectric grease on the boat and using it liberally is easy and simple.
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Old 09-03-2016, 11:44 AM   #32
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Just use Boeshield or something like it and rest easy.
I'm curious when Boeshield became generally available and popular. I remember as a kid that my Dad would score some cans of it from his patients that worked for Boeing, I think before it became widely available back in the '70s I think.

Great stuff and I have a can of it in the same zip lock bag that has my can of dielectric grease.
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Old 09-03-2016, 11:50 AM   #33
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I'm curious when Boeshield became generally available and popular. I remember as a kid that my Dad would score some cans of it from his patients that worked for Boeing, I think before it became widely available back in the '70s I think.
Not sure when it became generally available.

But I've been buying and using it for decades now.
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Old 09-03-2016, 11:53 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by seattleboatguy View Post
I don't understand the theory behind this. If you have a 30 amp breaker next to the shore power outlet, and then another 30 amp breaker a few feet away on the main panel, it would seem kind of redundant to me. Why do the newer boats have both?
Older boats have breakers after the main panel power selector switch which does not protect the switch and or the power socket and cord. So new boats have breakers before and after. Our old power cord was 15+ years old, and was protect with the addition breaker. The plug ends where still in good shape but to be safe replaced the cord. The breaker at the dock power plug protects the dock end, and the reason very seldom that end is damaged. Its a requirement on all US sold boats. Redundancy is good.

Being the boat wiring is old we have breaker on all power out let's and high amp heaters. Figured when installing GFI required out let's might as well do them all. You can buy plug in GFI protectors at most hard ware stores.
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Old 09-03-2016, 12:19 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by Capt.Bill11 View Post
Don't use either.

Why would you use one grease that could inhibit conductivity or one that can cause a short because is so conductve?

Just use Boeshield or something like it and rest easy.
You know, I think I have some of that stuff. I used to use it on the stanchions when I had my sailboat. I'll dig it out of my storage locker and give it a try.
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Old 09-03-2016, 12:22 PM   #36
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Older boats have breakers after the main panel power selector switch which does not protect the switch and or the power socket and cord...
Good explanation. Thanks.
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Old 09-03-2016, 12:23 PM   #37
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Why don't the pedestals have the locking ring threads?
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Old 09-03-2016, 12:27 PM   #38
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Check with your insurer. They may have a rebate program for an upgrade to Smart Plug at the boat/power inlet end. In my case the insurer sent me a cheque for $150 when I sent them a photo of my new installation.
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Old 09-03-2016, 12:31 PM   #39
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Why don't the pedestals have the locking ring threads?
That is a great question! It really annoys me, particularly on transient docks, when the receptacle is so worn that the plug almost falls out.
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Old 09-03-2016, 12:48 PM   #40
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There is an ancient 120V 50A plug and socket style that would work.

My guess is the dock CB will pass more than 30A for long enough to melt the 30A.

Simplest would be a 240V 50A inlet fitting and plug on your 30A power hose.

With only one leg hooked up , carries 50A easily.

These would be robust enough and the dock CB would still protect the power hose and the boats CB would protect the boat.
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