Go Back   Trawler Forum > Trawler Forum > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-13-2016, 09:52 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
Ka_sea_ta's Avatar
 
City: Puget Sound
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Ka_sea_ta
Vessel Model: 48 Defever
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Was she a Wind class breaker? Or the Glacier?
Neither, your much to young.... Burton Island
__________________
Advertisement

Ka_sea_ta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2016, 10:31 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 195
I've found for me it is best to take a dramamine and go sleep for a few hours when I first get on a boat. That way my body is acclimated to the motion once I get up.
__________________

folivier is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2016, 03:08 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
sbu22's Avatar
 
City: New Orleans
Country: US
Vessel Name: Panache
Vessel Model: Viking 43 Double Cabin '76
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 440
Old Navy saying - There's two kinds of sailors, those that get seasick and those that haven't yet.
sbu22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2016, 04:23 PM   #24
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 12,943
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ka_sea_ta View Post
Neither, your much to young.... Burton Island
I wasn't sure, but she is listed as 269 feet..... like her sister wind class that I flew off of...the Northwind and Westwind.

She was decommissioned while I was in, but about 5 years before my polar service.

For those that haven't heard, the older USCG icebreakers had hulls shaped like footbalks...if you didn't get sick on them...you probably wouldnt.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2016, 04:54 PM   #25
dvd
Senior Member
 
dvd's Avatar
 
City: California Bay Area
Country: US
Vessel Name: RUNTIME
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 32
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 258
Three years of cruising, only got sick once - when I was helping a friend do an "emergency" fuel filter change, buried in his bilge with 4 ft chop on the Chesapeake ("Chesapuke"). My wife is very prone to motion sickness and although she got more and more used to being on the water, whenever things got rough she took the helm, otherwise she would get sick...
dvd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2016, 05:05 PM   #26
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 8,485
Quote:
Originally Posted by dvd View Post
Three years of cruising, only got sick once - when I was helping a friend do an "emergency" fuel filter change, buried in his bilge with 4 ft chop on the Chesapeake ("Chesapuke"). My wife is very prone to motion sickness and although she got more and more used to being on the water, whenever things got rough she took the helm, otherwise she would get sick...
I've never been seasick although once when young was very sick on the sea, but started throwing up immediately after breakfast, which was on land, and it was determined to be food poisoning. Still an awful place to have it.

I got car sick as a kid. Couldn't read in a car, also front seat better than back. However, the biggest thing was I had a need for food before we went into and curved through and over the mountains. We would leave home very early and try to drive a long distance and finally it became that I insisted on breakfast within the first hour and before the mountainous terrain. Never got car sick again.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2016, 06:27 PM   #27
TF Site Team
 
jwnall's Avatar
 
City: St. Marks, Florida
Country: US
Vessel Name: Morgan
Vessel Model: Gulfstar 36
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 3,290
Um, I do not particularly recommend it, but a crowded troopship from Seattle Washington to Japan, with the troops sleeping (?) in stacked bunks 18 inches apart, and vomit rolling on the floor with every roll, and three solid days of heaving, worked wonders for me. I probably could not get seasick now even if I tried really hard.
__________________
John
jwnall is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2016, 06:52 PM   #28
Guru
 
City: Hotel, CA
Country: Fried
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 7,687
I normally yak once and am fine after that. My dad never did regardless of conditions so asked him the secret. His secret was 3 days riding out a typhoon on the Sea of Japan in a diesel electric sub on the surface coming home from the Korean War. Cook to the Captain and every single other man puked in that stinky tube. By the time they opened the hatch in port they'd all been "cured".
__________________
Craig - AKA Some Clueless Idiot

The person who is saying something is impossible should not interrupt the person who is doing it.
CPseudonym is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2016, 07:08 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
Ka_sea_ta's Avatar
 
City: Puget Sound
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Ka_sea_ta
Vessel Model: 48 Defever
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
I wasn't sure, but she is listed as 269 feet..... like her sister wind class that I flew off of...the Northwind and Westwind.
I was a brown shoe also...
Ka_sea_ta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2016, 07:39 PM   #30
Senior Member
 
City: Owings, Md
Country: US
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 142
I worked on fishing charter boats for 8 years both inshore and offshore. There are certainly both physiological and psychological factors at play. Most clients who came on board nervous about getting sick did indeed wind up sick, it can be a self fulfilling prophecy. Of course being hungover dramically increases your odds and it seemed like a prerequisite for many charters to stay out drinking the night before their trip. I always avoided the subject and discouraged talk about it. I fished with a number of different captains and the one that went into great detailed instructions about where to get sick had a higher number of sick guests than the captains that didn't bring it up. The instructions were typically ignored anyway.
I developed a habit of lying to clients and claiming that this particular boat rocks an a fashion that doesn't make people sick, and if I ended up caught in the lie they were to busy feeling miserable to get mad at me.
Fishing offshore was a whole new game, once guys lose sight of land they were far more likely to get sick.
If you medicate do it well in advance (24 hours) to allow your body to acclimate or it was too late or just makes you too drowsy. Clients who did this never had a problem, although these guys also weren't the one drinking the night before either.

(I worked alot on head boats the first few years (whole different clientele) that fished 65 and grew very proficient at unclogging heads)
Gdavid is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2016, 08:05 PM   #31
Guru
 
Northern Spy's Avatar
 
City: Powell River, BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Northern Spy
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 26
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 2,322
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gdavid View Post
There are certainly both physiological and psychological factors at play. Most clients who came on board nervous about getting sick did indeed wind up sick, it can be a self fulfilling prophecy.
Agree. Although I think there may be some genetics involved.

On a submarine, there weren't enough people to cover the duties of others if one was seasick. Sometimes days at periscope depth in the north Pacific, and they rolled like pigs.

We used to have these little orange buckets on board; a bit over a gallon, like an ice cream pail size. The Chief of the Boat (COB) would remove the metal bail, and make a rope loop instead, so that the sick could wear around their neck and carry on with their watch.

That seemed to cure quite a few people.
Northern Spy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2016, 08:36 PM   #32
Senior Member
 
shufti's Avatar
 
City: Brisbane
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Wine Down
Vessel Model: Riviera 35' FB
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 179
The best way I've found to avoid sea sickness is to always drive from the flybridge so I can't see, hear or smell those who are sea sick down below.
shufti is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2016, 09:41 PM   #33
Veteran Member
 
MYMT's Avatar
 
City: Stuart
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Caretta
Vessel Model: Marine Trader Sedan
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 82
Whenever I start to feel a bit woozy, a Hostess Cupcake and a a cold beer (preferably a pale ale) ...
...works for me...
MYMT is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2016, 10:12 PM   #34
Senior Member
 
Capt. Jon's Avatar
 
City: Alabama
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Waypoint
Vessel Model: Californian 48' CPMY
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 349
I can't really remember a time that I did not have some kind of boat. That said I cannot remember a time that I have not been sea sick. I could write a book on the subject. I can puke in mid sentence and not miss a word. Funny part is it does not have to be a lot of sea motion to get me there. It can be such gentle rollers and I can get sick. Big seas and I might be just fine.

Seems to get better after a good nights sleep at sea. Good thing I love it or I'd be in real trouble. I seem to take abuse from those sometimes around me about but I take it in stride. I just like to make sure what ever boat I'm on has a window without a screen in the cockpit! Use as needed!
__________________
Jon
------------------------------------------------
Waypoint's are abstract, often having no obvious relationship to any distinctive features of the real world.
Capt. Jon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2016, 10:54 PM   #35
Veteran Member
 
ufish2's Avatar
 
City: Farmington, NM
Country: USA
Vessel Name: UTUG2
Vessel Model: Outer Reef 26
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 33
You might try juicing ginger root and mixing it fairly strong with ginger ale. Another homeopathic fix is Hyland's Motion Sickness | Hyland's Homeopathic. You must apply it often behind the ears but it works fairly well if your not going to be out longer than 8 hours. There are several medications that can be effecitive such as meclizine, scopolamine patch, and bonine. Over the counter benadryl can also be helpful.
ufish2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2016, 01:09 AM   #36
Veteran Member
 
sailor john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 35
I get seasick. Terribly sea sick. But by knowing my triggers, I (sort of) control it.
As stated previously, its different for everyone. It is important as a Skipper, to watch your guests and know the signs:
Passengers who are suffering become quiet. Their skin goes pale. Their skin may also go clammy. If a passenger shows these signs, I try to get them on the helm and steer. Most often it works wonders.
I try not to talk about it.
I clean their glasses or sunglasses, (or better, take them off). I get rid of things like I-pads, and note books. Stop texting etc. Have them keep busy by keeping a look-out for ships on the horizon facing forwards. Don't let them go below. Cooler, fresh air is their friend. I always have medication on board. Try Sea-Bands. I wear them. They may work; or they may be a placebo. either way, your passengers will thank you for trying 'something'.
No alcohol. Dry crackers and water sips only. Plan to medicate ahead of time if it's rough. Let everyone know, that your intent is to keep them well and happy, and turning back IS an option.
My 2 cents...
Sailor John
sailor john is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2016, 07:28 AM   #37
Senior Member
 
sum escape's Avatar
 
City: Muskegon, MI
Country: Cruising
Vessel Name: Sum Escape
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 47' Europa
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lobstah View Post
Years ago, someone explained to me that there were basically two groups of people when it came to sea-sickness.
One group is "externally focused" and needed to be able to see/focus on the "horizon", as they needed a reference point.
The other group is "internally focused", and can't see the horizon because it reinforces the motion.
Yes, my admiral is the latter. She lies in the salon with curtains drawn and can actually read etc. while at sea. Open the curtains and seeing the waves makes her ill. And as others have stated, the issue is getting better with time aboard as well.
sum escape is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2016, 08:22 AM   #38
Dauntless Award
 
Wxx3's Avatar
 
City: New York, NY
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Dauntless
Vessel Model: Kadey Krogen 42 - 148
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,923
Quote:
Originally Posted by puddlepirate View Post
In my experience with being underway, prevention is absolutely the key for people who know that they get sea sick. Dramamine or other anti-motion sickness pills are great, but they do not do a good job of stopping sickness once you are already sick. You need to start taking them the night before as others have suggested. Another option are scopolamine patches. I know that the doctors in the coast guard prescribe them to some of the guys on my cutter, and they seem to work pretty well. each patch lasts for a few days, and a lot of times once the patch wears off you have acclimatized to being underway and may not need to apply another patch. Maybe not as practical for day trips, but definitely good for spending extended time on board.

Chris
Yes, this is my experience also. I have ups and downs. Leaving Ireland, earlier this summer, my two nephews assured me they would be fine in spite of the fact they both had brought various remedies.

An hour into our 40 hour trip, they where both out for the count.

So it was just me until France.

I have also found that the various remedies work well as long as taken, started before you are actually sea sick. Once I get sea sick, I must sleep to reset everything to get the remedies to take effect.

Lastly, I will cut the patch in half, or take it off after 12 hours and then reapply it.
__________________
M/Y Dauntless, New York
a Kadey Krogen 42 Currently in Western Europe
Blog: http://dauntlessatsea.com
Find us: https://share.delorme.com/dauntless
Wxx3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2016, 09:39 AM   #39
Senior Member
 
City: Tampa, FL
Country: USA
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by CPseudonym View Post
I normally yak once and am fine after that.
Same here. Just like every person reacts in their own way to the various "cures" that are available, so every person reacts in their own way to the seasickness itself. Some people are quite incapacitated by it. Others heave over the side, wipe off their chin, and get back to what they were doing. Luckily for me, I am one of the latter.

I get seasick at some point during the first day or two of almost every voyage. I am blessed in that it is rarely more than a minor annoyance.
denverd0n is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2016, 11:48 AM   #40
Guru
 
koliver's Avatar
 
City: Saltspring Island
Country: BC, canada
Vessel Name: Retreat
Vessel Model: C&L 44
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,707
"My belief in seasickness is mostly genetic and exposure. I think some people are predestined to motion sickness and anything may aggravate it or mitigate it.

But as Ted pointed out, for the vast majority of people, exposure to motion generally acclimates one towards motion."

Mostly genetics.
My mother used to have a beer before going out in rough weather. That worked for her.
I am very fortunate to never get seasick so I haven't had to evaluate any of the suggested remedies.
My wife, does get seasick. She finds Gravol helps, so does being the helmsperson, for her that is the best remedy. She has tried the patch and the wrist buttons, but neither worked for her.
None of our kids get seasick, neither did my Dad. My mother in law was queasy on a BC ferry.
Genetics.
__________________

__________________
Keith
koliver is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012