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Old 02-09-2009, 12:50 PM   #41
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RE: The Salmon Troller WHITE CLOUD

Outlaw,

*** Following up on what Marin said Lynne Reister owns an old Monk and is heavily involved in wood/classic boat stuff around the Sound. She's a wonderful person, quiet and honest. There was an article on her in the June issue of 2004 PMM. She does not do mechanical but she does FG boats also. I don't know how she keeps her pony tail out of the bilge and she is probably even more in demand now than before. Shoping for a boat is an exciteing and scary time so any way to reduce the risks is very good.

Eric Henning*
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Old 02-09-2009, 07:32 PM   #42
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RE: The Salmon Troller WHITE CLOUD

eric, thanks, if i do anything i will give her a call. what is your boat, i like it

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Old 02-10-2009, 04:12 AM   #43
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RE: The Salmon Troller WHITE CLOUD

"Wood is every bit as good a boat building material as glass, aluminum, or steel. All four materials require different construction, maintenance, and repair techniques, but I don't believe that one is superior to the other as a blanket statement. Anyone who doubts the longevity, maintainability, or repairability of wood has only to visit the Grand Banks Owners forum to see that wood boats that were well made to begin with can give every bit as long a service life as glass or metal boats. "

What is missing here is the COST of constant maint , because a tiny deck or other leak that would only be cosmetic on plastic or tin boats may be a disaster for a woodie.

The price of a woodie is 100% up to the second repairs , leaving the boat to sit for months or years can cost thousands of times the problems of other construction methods.

For a GB owner that lives aboard keeping water OUT is a simple tho perhaps full time job (at least observing leaks is EZ) the repair may be a task.

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Old 02-10-2009, 06:32 PM   #44
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The Salmon Troller WHITE CLOUD

Quote:
FF wrote:

For a GB owner that lives aboard keeping water OUT is a simple tho perhaps full time job (at least observing leaks is EZ) the repair may be a task.
Not true at all.* First of all, very few GB owners live aboard their boats so they are not there battling the ingress of water on a full-time basis.* But a GB woodie, or any quality wood boat, that is up to snuff is no more prone to*water leaks than a boat made out of any other material that's in the same condition.

I see just as many comments about window leaks, deck leaks, etc. on the GB owners forum from the owners of fiberglass GBs as I do from the owners of the woodies.* I think oldfishboat is right on the money*when he states that the differences in build materials only makes the problems different, it doesn't make them more or less.

The owner of a steel boat---- and I know several of them--- can spend a lot of time tracking down leaks that put water on the inside of the hull.* Keeping the inside of a steel hull dry can be a "full time job."* A steel hull rusting out from the inside is every bit as expensive a fix as a wood hull rotting out from the inside.* The owner of a fiberglass boat with deck leaks--- be it from leaks from a teak deck or water getting in around hardware mounted directly to a fiberglass deck--- can face repairs every bit as expensive as the owner of a wood boat with the same problem.

As oldfishboat says, any boat made of any material*will suffer expensive damage if not maintained.* But all the boatbuilding materials--- and I guess I should have included ferro-cement, too--- are good if they are used in applications where they make sense.* You probably don't want to make a guided missile frigate out of wood, and you probably don't want to make a kayak out of ferro-cement



-- Edited by Marin at 19:35, 2009-02-10
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Old 02-11-2009, 04:10 AM   #45
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RE: The Salmon Troller WHITE CLOUD

The woodie will be rotting due to wet/dry, wet/dry as time goes on.

The plastic boat may suffer mold and loss of soft goods , foam and similar , but a simple leak does not place the hull at risk.

Tin boats will have almost the same paint protection , inside or outside so a leak is not the cause of hull rusting , FAILURE to remove the interior and do a complete re do of the necessary surface protection system is.

All it takes on a woodie is a DRY boat NO LEAKS , and they last a long time , but that is a really high standard.

Failure to maintain the wood vessel 100% will eventually destroy the vessel, not so on plastic or tin.

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Old 02-11-2009, 10:33 AM   #46
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RE: The Salmon Troller WHITE CLOUD

Quote:
oldfishboat wrote:

FF

I have ta laugh. You got me !!!


You post this stuff in a thread talking about a wood boat built in 1928.

Kinda what I was thinking.....

But, I would never own a wood boat.
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Old 02-11-2009, 12:37 PM   #47
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RE: The Salmon Troller WHITE CLOUD

I remember an article that was written in the early 70's in "Sail" magazine (Yes, before I came over to the dark side LOL). It was a tongue in cheeck April 1 article about a newly discovered genus of the wood boring toredo, or ship worm. It talked about the horrors of the Polyestermite which attacked fiberglass the same way shipworms attcked wood.

Shortly after that article, the industry discovered boat pox or blisters, which is an expensive fix for fiberglass. Nothing is impervious.

On a side note (and back to the thread topic of an older wood trawler, I went aboard an older wooden boat one time that had salt blocks on shelving down in the bilge, which was used to keep the boat "sweet", the practice being in the old days to keep the humidity, leakage, etc, as the same salinity as the outside water, and to prevent dry rot. You might want to check this out with some of the real old timers, Outlaw.
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Old 02-11-2009, 01:10 PM   #48
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RE: The Salmon Troller WHITE CLOUD

"... salt blocks on shelving down in the bilge,..."

My 1944 tug had "salt shelves" between the frames and the ceilings. They were horizontal boards that kept the salt from falling down to the bilge (looked just like the fire stops in a wood frame house) and after many years the salt hardened like rock. At the risk of starting a discussion on the merits of salt shelves, it seemed to be very effective as there was no sign of rot in those areas.

But, playing on the fringes of that old argument, fresh water is what rots wood boats, salt water and metal parts dissolves them from the inside. Electrolysis creates sodium hydroxide that dissolves the lignin in the wood and leaves the cellulose fibers bulging out looking like straw. The cure for that is a garden sprayer full of vinegar.

And getting back to WHITE CLOUD. Those aluminum bulwarks are common on those boats. The combination of wracking, rafting up or bouncing off pilings, put a lot of stress on wooden bulwarks and let rain get into the futtocks and clamps then there is the devil to pay ... no nautical pun intended.*Aluminum bulwarks will save enough work to provide time to deall with all the other areas that are falling apart behind your back.
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Old 02-11-2009, 02:37 PM   #49
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RE: The Salmon Troller WHITE CLOUD

"... a small drill bit and a smile on my face ..."

Tee hee, I have this image of you standing on the dock with Dewalt in hand, ready to board.

I always used a scratch awl and a little plastic hammer, it created a little less apprehension at the start.
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Old 02-11-2009, 02:41 PM   #50
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RE: The Salmon Troller WHITE CLOUD

yeah, i remember growing up, thats been along time ago, oh no, i am still growing up.lol. around the boats and remember salt blocks, forgot what they did with em, now i remember. an yes that house and bulwarks are aluminum on white cloud. i re-read dock street post with the pictures. didn't read much of the post till now. thought they were steel. it was hard to tell with the paint on it. so that could be a good thing,hmmm. have not had time to talk to dock street yet. that boat ain't going anywheres anyways to soon thats for sure as there is no brokage sign on the boat just the for sale sign and the # is no good and nobody at the warf knows anything. so will try and get down soon.

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Old 02-11-2009, 02:53 PM   #51
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RE: The Salmon Troller WHITE CLOUD

Further to what Rickb says, fresh water boats from the Great Lakes and the rivers were quick to rot out. In the early 70's, before Trojan went FRP they built many wood boats using various preservatives in the timbers, planking and*plywood. I for some years owned one of these in fresh water and 0 rot. Wheras some of the same age non preservative wooden vessels were rotting after 6 years in fresh water. Of course wooden boat's topsides that see rainwater as compared to salt water rot out too - tough to rub salt up there.

I must say, FRP on my current vessel is much easier to take care of than wood*but my varnished caprail is another story.
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Old 02-11-2009, 03:22 PM   #52
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The Salmon Troller WHITE CLOUD

"... tough to rub salt up there ..."

That's why a salt water washdown is part of life. I used to use a product called Timbor when moored in fresh water, it's a borax compound sold as an insecticide that comes in bags like salt. You make a saturated mixture with water and spray it all over with a garden sprayer ... just like the one full of vinegar. The stuff kills the fungus that causes dry rot

I had varnished caprails on my tug, they were beautiful but after a couple of years I broke out the black paint and never looked back. My yachtie friends cringed and my workboat buddies just smiled. My story was that it was all workboat outside and pure yacht inside ... and it was, except for the original engineroom.

-- Edited by RickB at 16:23, 2009-02-11
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Old 02-12-2009, 05:08 AM   #53
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RE: The Salmon Troller WHITE CLOUD

usualy the reaction from the owner at that point tells me a lot.



IF Someone came to inspect MY boat with a drill ,

he would be rapidly invited to leave or find out hoe well a 357Magnum makes holes.

NO survey needs a drill, a rotten tub can be found with a sharp DOWEL.

For most look sees, a tuning fork works best , totally non invasive.

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Old 02-12-2009, 07:58 AM   #54
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RE: The Salmon Troller WHITE CLOUD

Caliber is less important than bullet type.

I have always found that a hollow-point will stop fairly quickly in good wood and not damage anything on the other side, and the hole is easy to plug. But if the wood's no good who cares what's behind it ...
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