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Old 06-26-2016, 02:53 PM   #1
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Sailing Dinghy?

Here's a bit of sacrilege...

I've always wanted to learn how to sail. Being boatless and a bit cheap at this point, now might be the time to try. I'd really like to find myself a pretty little sailing dinghy. Something that would be easy for an idiot like me to learn. Something that would require little maintenance. No galley, head, electrical or plumbing systems. Something I could tack a tiny little outboard motor onto, and just bumble around in for an afternoon.

Do any of you have any suggestions?

Something vaguely like this.
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Old 06-26-2016, 03:01 PM   #2
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I think that's a cool plan. I recently bought a crappy old Hobie 16 that I like to tear around on. Problem with the Hobie is it's kind of a bitch to set up. Need help to do it.

Wonder how well a sailing dingy actually sails?
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Old 06-26-2016, 03:26 PM   #3
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Wonder how well a sailing dingy actually sails?
Spome of them sail quite nicely! My 10' Bauer was really excellent. Shown here with the Jib down. My friends 7' Fatty knees was a little more treacherous for full sized people....



Bauer 10:


great rower and kid trainer too. Used a 2 hp Honda on it when powering about.

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Old 06-26-2016, 03:39 PM   #4
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Sailing Dinghy?

Very cool!

How heavy is that 10' Bauer?

I've thought about a sailing dingy, but figured they would be too heavy to hoist by hand up on my PH roof. I'm actually not sure how much longer I'll be able to pull this dingy up the roof actually. It weighs about 100lbs and it's a struggle.

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Old 06-26-2016, 03:45 PM   #5
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Very cool!

How heavy is that 10' Bauer?

I've thought about a sailing dingy, but figured they would be too heavy to hoist by hand up on my PH roof. I'm actually not sure how much longer I'll be able to pull this dingy up the roof actually. It weighs about 100lbs and it's a struggle.

Attachment 53534
The Bauer was pretty heavy. 130 bare and 160 rigged. We towed it behind our 35' sailboat when we had it. Some nice sialing dinks are lighter..Maybe the Trinka. Gonna be hard to get below 100 lbs though. I feel your pain.. I'm contemplating whether I can easily get a 40 lb Kayak up on my overhead. None of us are a strong as we used to be!

Bauer boats 10 sailing dinghy - BAUTECK MARINE INC.
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Old 06-26-2016, 03:50 PM   #6
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I think that's a cool plan. I recently bought a crappy old Hobie 16 that I like to tear around on. Problem with the Hobie is it's kind of a bitch to set up. Need help to do it.
Been a while since I had a Hobie 16, but I do not remember it being all that hard to set up. Only semi-hard thing is putting the mast up, but you just walk it up, and I don't remember it being difficult. My recollection is that you walk it up, fasten the forestay, and that is it.

So what makes yours so hard to set up, if I may ask? Just curious -- not at all saying that it is not.
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Old 06-26-2016, 03:56 PM   #7
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You need to consider the differences and the compromises, in no particular order: Size. Capacity. Weight. Complexity. Safety. Beauty. Speed. Responsiveness. Stability.

A Laser would rate pretty well in my view, except it's really too small for someone as large and as inflexible as I am.

My personal favorite since I was about 11, is a Flying Dutchman. 20', 280lbs, fast, old ones are no more complex than any dinghy with a stayed mast and a jib (anything newer than about 1965 contain oodles of spaghetti), any newer than about 1980 are self-bailing and easy to right, faster than most anything, responsive. But, I blather.

Our FD in sailing condition is Surcease, FD US 29, dating from the mid-'50's, all wood, all rebuilt by me in the 2000's. (There are two more FD in the barn.)

Pics: Sue and me sailing at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum Small Boat Festival. Surcease, FD US 29, sailing in about 1958 by her original owner-builder. Surcease awaiting another pleasant ride!
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Old 06-26-2016, 03:59 PM   #8
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Been a while since I had a Hobie 16, but I do not remember it being all that hard to set up. Only semi-hard thing is putting the mast up, but you just walk it up, and I don't remember it being difficult. My recollection is that you walk it up, fasten the forestay, and that is it.

So what makes yours so hard to set up, if I may ask? Just curious -- not at all saying that it is not.

I can't figure out how to walk the mast up alone and then connect the forestay which is all the way forward between the pontoons. I walk the mast up on the trampoline so can't reach the forestay. I've thought about using the trailer winch somehow, but so far my buddy usually sails with me so I've had help.
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Old 06-26-2016, 04:04 PM   #9
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With respect to single handed rigging dinghies and other small boats with stayed masts: Arrange for the foot of the mast to stay put, either by a pad, or a temporary maststep, or by the design if the maststep. Rig the shrouds. Rig the forestay with a temporary line attached to the forestay and passing through the forestay deck fitting. Walk the mast up. When vertical, pick it up and place the foot in the step. Hold it with your shoulder. Pull your temporary forestay line tight and cleat/tie it somewhere.

I used to take my young kids sailing in the FD I had then and they were too young to be any help rigging.
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Old 06-26-2016, 04:05 PM   #10
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Those are some lovely boats, DH. I don't think speed is a very high priority in my case. I'd be more inclined towards stability and capacity, methinks.

Does anyone have any experience with a Trinka 12?
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Old 06-26-2016, 04:25 PM   #11
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I would love to have a Trinka 12. Unfortunately I've never had the chance to sail one. When they were made in Miami, Mark, who builds them, was a regular customer. I got a tour of the "factory" one time as well. I don't think there is a prettier boat made. It just looks right. I think a couple of guys here on TF have Trinkas but I don't think they sail them, row and motor only. I may be wrong about that, I am often wrong.
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Old 06-26-2016, 04:31 PM   #12
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I had a Trinka 12 a dozen or so years ago. It was a sweet sailor. Easy to handle by yourself but could carry another easily.


A lot depends on the waters you will be sailing in. I also had an O'Day 17 that I sailed in LI Sound. It could handle more wind and chop than the Trinka. I sailed the Trinka in the protected waters near the mouth of the Severn River in Annapolis.


The Trinka was light enough to launch from the beach with a Seitech beach trailer. You couldn't do that with the O'Day.


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Old 06-26-2016, 04:31 PM   #13
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The Classic Whitehall Spirit has been on my short list for a long time... Can be set up to row, scull, sail or with a small outboard and is available in a 14' or 17' version.

Whitehall Spirit® Solo 14™ & Tango 17™ Sculling Rowboats
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Old 06-26-2016, 04:58 PM   #14
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We had a Portland Pudgy on our last boat. It was a great shore boat for two people; rowed well and the sail rig could be completely removed or stored in a compartment on board and out of the way. Didn't have an outboard but it could take 2 HP.

Dinghy | Lifeboat | Yacht Tender | Portland Pudgy
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Old 06-26-2016, 06:03 PM   #15
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I have a Walker Bay with sail kit. It's been a good dinghy, not too heavy, it's Tupperware bullet proof and it actually sails pretty well.......
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Old 06-26-2016, 06:06 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by DHeckrotte View Post
You need to consider the differences and the compromises, in no particular order: Size. Capacity. Weight. Complexity. Safety. Beauty. Speed. Responsiveness. Stability.

A Laser would rate pretty well in my view, except it's really too small for someone as large and as inflexible as I am.

My personal favorite since I was about 11, is a Flying Dutchman. 20', 280lbs, fast, old ones are no more complex than any dinghy with a stayed mast and a jib (anything newer than about 1965 contain oodles of spaghetti), any newer than about 1980 are self-bailing and easy to right, faster than most anything, responsive. But, I blather.

Our FD in sailing condition is Surcease, FD US 29, dating from the mid-'50's, all wood, all rebuilt by me in the 2000's. (There are two more FD in the barn.)

Pics: Sue and me sailing at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum Small Boat Festival. Surcease, FD US 29, sailing in about 1958 by her original owner-builder. Surcease awaiting another pleasant ride!
Where was that? I grew up in Holland.... Never sailed the FD, but crewed on 16sqm, Vrijheid, sailed a Vaurien, and watched the FD's, Finn's, Moths, 470's and of course it all started with the boat in my pic... Yes we had racing fields of 100+.....IN EACH CLASS......

Edit.... OK, Chez, St Michaels... love the place.
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Old 06-26-2016, 06:52 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Wayfarer View Post
Here's a bit of sacrilege...

I've always wanted to learn how to sail. Being boatless and a bit cheap at this point, now might be the time to try. I'd really like to find myself a pretty little sailing dinghy. Something that would be easy for an idiot like me to learn. Something that would require little maintenance. No galley, head, electrical or plumbing systems. Something I could tack a tiny little outboard motor onto, and just bumble around in for an afternoon.

Do any of you have any suggestions?

Something vaguely like this.
That's a sweet boat Wayfayer . Looks heavy built and beamy . I have a Trinka 10 .I bought it used . It was set up at the factory to sail . The sail kit was lost or sold along the way . I think at one time the Trinka was an option when purchasing a new Island Packet . I want to get everything I need to sail it and teach my grandkids how to sail .
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Old 06-26-2016, 07:07 PM   #18
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Nestaway 14 looks pretty cool and packs up small;

https://nestawayboats.com/shop/nesta...sting-trio-14/
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Old 06-26-2016, 07:18 PM   #19
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How about a Minto

You might try a Minto. It's a 9' dingy with a single sail, and dagger board. It's a great rower. They are now made new by Rich Passage Minto Sailing Dinghy.
I had a used one years ago as a rowing dingy.
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Old 06-26-2016, 07:54 PM   #20
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The Classic Whitehall Spirit has been on my short list for a long time... Can be set up to row, scull, sail or with a small outboard and is available in a 14' or 17' version.

Whitehall Spirit® Solo 14™ & Tango 17™ Sculling Rowboats

That solo 14 is an absolutely beautiful little boat. So sleek and graceful!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pack Mule View Post
That's a sweet boat Wayfayer . Looks heavy built and beamy . I have a Trinka 10 .I bought it used . It was set up at the factory to sail . The sail kit was lost or sold along the way . I think at one time the Trinka was an option when purchasing a new Island Packet . I want to get everything I need to sail it and teach my grandkids how to sail .

You and I definitely have similar tastes. The one in the ad might be a bit big at 18', but she does have some really great lines. Your Trinka is a really lovely boat. I think the 12 is basically my short list at this point.

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I had a Trinka 12 a dozen or so years ago. It was a sweet sailor. Easy to handle by yourself but could carry another easily.


A lot depends on the waters you will be sailing in. I also had an O'Day 17 that I sailed in LI Sound. It could handle more wind and chop than the Trinka. I sailed the Trinka in the protected waters near the mouth of the Severn River in Annapolis.


The Trinka was light enough to launch from the beach with a Seitech beach trailer. You couldn't do that with the O'Day.


David

I'd be towing it around by land yacht from lake to lake. I'd be using it on fairly protected waterways.
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