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Old 04-08-2015, 09:05 AM   #1
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Sailboat Hits Bridge on ICW

Yesterday we traveled from Lake Worth to Miami on the ICW for the first (and last?) time. We've never done it before and wanted to check out the yachts and real estate. We were about 30 minutes from the Dania Beach Blvd Bridge (22' clearance) when we heard a man asking for a bridge opening. The tender said he would have to wait till the scheduled bridge opening. He said he needed one now! The tender came back and said, "I can't just press a button to open the bridge". Well, the conversation went back and forth till he slammed into the bridge, upon which the sailor called a Mayday. Boy did channel 16 and 9 light up! When we arrived, every law enforcement group that had a boat was there plus their support services on land. With the boat (a 35 ft sailboat) actually pinned under the bridge, nobody was going anywhere. About an hour later, they raised the bridge while pulling the boat against the current to get free. 10 minutes later we continued south. No one was hurt. The sailboat had spreader damaged but it didn't sink. I'd love to find out why it hit the bridge. Nothing like a little excitement to keep you alert.
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Old 04-08-2015, 09:23 AM   #2
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Greetings,
Mr. LM. Did the sailboat have engine/steerage problems? One would hope if the "captain" did have a problem, other than attitude, he would heave to and anchor and call for assistance. The channel there is wide enough to anchor pretty well anywhere and still not impede traffic. IF there was an attitude problem, he got what he deserved. Still, glad no-one was injured.
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Old 04-08-2015, 09:35 AM   #3
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I can't imagine that attitude was the problem. More likely engine failure or loss of steering is the cause. That plus that fact that you just can't depend on a Rocna.
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Old 04-08-2015, 09:38 AM   #4
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Greetings,
Mr. M. You know, you're right. I never considered the "Rocna Factor".

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Old 04-08-2015, 09:43 AM   #5
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Don't know why, but it reminds me of the old one about the ship hailing the lighthouse demanding it change course to avoid collision.

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Old 04-08-2015, 09:49 AM   #6
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We didn't hear the sailor give any indication of mechanical problems, but we might have missed it. We did hear the bridge tender offer an emergency opening, but said that she couldn't just push a button, she needed to clear the bridge traffic. By this point, both voices where raised a bit in panic/helplessness. We can say that the sailor did not sound particularly "well-seasoned"...
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Old 04-08-2015, 09:52 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJim View Post
Don't know why, but it reminds me of the old one about the ship hailing the lighthouse demanding it change course to avoid collision...
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Old 04-08-2015, 09:54 AM   #8
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The current is wicked there. I think that is like the third time in the past 6 months or so that has happened.
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Old 04-08-2015, 11:04 AM   #9
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bent mast, damage to the rigging, etc.... looks like an expensive way to start the season. Would love to get the rest of the story if anyone comes across it.
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Old 04-08-2015, 11:19 AM   #10
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Last year while waiting to lock through the Chittenden locks from the west we saw a large sailboat had lost power and drifted into and got stuck under the stationary span of the Salmon Bay bridge, better known to train buffs as the Burlington Northern bridge #4.



View looking west, boats entering the "large" lock.


Closed with traffic.


We were tied to the wall waiting. It was quite a while on a busy Sunday and watched the mast snap in two with vessel assist there to pick up the pieces. No one was harmed.
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Old 04-08-2015, 02:13 PM   #11
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This prob'ly belongs in the joke thread, but the topic is so perfect for it that I can't resist posting it here. It's OLD--my files say 2001...and whether it's really a true story is debatable, but doesn't matter...it's one of my favorites:

DONT PANIC- - -WRITE A REPORT!
The following report, from a ship's master is reproduced by kind
permission of the anonymous author who appears to be gifted with
remarkable sang froid.
.................................................. ...................

It is with regret and haste that I write this letter to you; regret that such a small misunderstanding could lead to the following circumstances, and haste in order that you get this report before you form your own pre-conceived opinions from reports in the world press, for I am sure that they will tend to overdramatise the affair.

We had just picked up the pilot and the apprentice had returned from changing the "G" flag for the "H" and, it being his first trip, he was having difficulty in rolling the "G" flag up. I therefore proceeded to show him how. Coming to the last part I told him to "let go!" The lad, although willing, is not too bright, necessitating my having to repeat the order in a sharper tone. At this moment the Chief Officer appeared from the chart room, having been plotting the vessel's progress, and, thinking that it was the anchors that were being referred to, repeated the "let go" order to the Third Officer on the forecastle. The port anchor, having been cleared away
but not walked out, was promptly let go! The effect of letting the anchor drop from the" pipe" while the vessel was proceeding at full harbour speed, proved too much for the windlass brake and the entire length of the port cable was pulled out "by the roots." I fear that the damage to the chain locker may be extensive.

The braking effect of the port anchor naturally caused the vessel to sheer in that direction, right towards the swing bridge that spans a tributary to the river, up which we were proceeding. The operator of the swing bridge, showed great presence of mind by opening the bridge for my ship. Unfortunately he did not stop the vehicular traffic first, the result being that the bridge partly opened and deposited a Volkswagon, two cyclists and a livestock truck on the foredeck. My ship's company are at present rounding up the contents of the latter, which from the noise I would say are pigs. In his efforts to stop the progress of the vessel, the Third Officer dropped the starboard anchor, too late to be of practical use, for it fell on the swing bridge operator's control cabin.

After the port anchor was let go and the vessel started to sheer, I gave a double ring "Full Astern" on the engine room telegraph and personally rang the Engine Room to order maximum astern revolutions. I was informed that the sea temperature was 53 degrees and asked if there was a film tonight. My reply would not add constructively to this report.

Up to now I have confined my report to the activities at the forward end of the vessel. Down aft they were having their own problems. At the moment the port anchor was let go, the second officer was supervising the making fast of the after tug and was lowering the ship's towing spring down on to the tug. The sudden braking effect on the port anchor caused the tug to "run in under" the stern of my vessel, just at the moment when the propeller was answering my double ring to "Full astern." The prompt action of the second officer in securing the inboard end of the towing spring delayed the sinking of the tug by some minutes, thereby allowing the safe abandoning of that vessel.

It is strange, but at that very same moment of letting go the port anchor, there was a power cut ashore. The fact that we were passing over a "cable area " at the time might suggest that we touched something on the bottom of the river bed. It is perhaps lucky that the high tension cables brought down by the foremast were not live, possibly being replaced by the underwater cable, but owing to the shore blackout, it is impossible to say where the pylon fell.

It never fails to amaze me, the actions of foreigners during moments of minor crisis. The pilot, for instance, is at the moment huddled in the corner, having consumed a bottle of gin in a time worthy of inclusion in The Guiness Book of Records. The tug captain on the other hand reacted violently, and had to be forcibly restrained by the steward, who has him handcuffed in the ship's hospital, where he is now, telling me to do impossible things with my ship and crew.

I enclose the names and addresses of the drivers and insurance companies of the vehicles on my foredeck, which the third officer collected after his somewhat hurried evacuation of the forecastle. These particulars will enable you to claim for the damage that they did to the railings of the No 1 hold.

I am closing this preliminary report, as I am finding it difficult to concentrate with the sound of police sirens and flashing lights. It is sad to think, that had the apprentice realised that there is no need to fly pilot flags after dark, none of this would have happened.

For weekly Accountability Report I will assign the following Casualty Numbers.... T17501010 to T 1750199 inclusive.

Yours truly, (name withheld)
MASTER.
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