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Old 05-05-2013, 01:08 PM   #101
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Originally Posted by Peter B View Post
Do you reckon the Hinkley or the Eastbay look better than this..?
God yes. The boat in your photo looks like a shoebox with a pointy end. At least that's the way I perceive it.
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Old 05-05-2013, 01:15 PM   #102
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And I think you are a bit biased toward GBs. Don't know what to think and I'll probably never ever need to know.
An Eastbay is not a GB, it's an Eastbay. It happens to be built by Grand Banks, Llc, but there is no similarity or commonality between the Eastbay line and the Grand Banks line. And i have no loyalty to the company, which these days is pretty screwed up product stategy-wise.

As I've said before, I don't find the Grand Banks to be a particularly good looking boat. The are very un-proportional, for one thing.

But an Eastbay is gorgeous, even more so in person than in photos. They look better with a dark hull than a white hull.
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Old 05-05-2013, 01:33 PM   #103
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That Hinckley looks fab. but for that kind of money I would go for a Dashew design.
I'll second that!

Hinckleys are gorgeous but you have to compare them to "society women" they generally have a lot more image that substance. The cost of upkeep required to keep them looking even a little better than competitors that sell for half the price and not only look good but perform well with half the upkeep is extortionate.

If you look closely at a Hinckley hull you will see that they are so light in resin that the weave of the fabric shows through and as those dark hulls heat in the sun for a couple of seasons, they begin to look like burlap.

Those boats are made and sold to folks who own them the same way they own thoroughbred horses, they like to be seen riding them in front of the right people in the right places then hand them over to high priced help for cleaning and storage.
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Old 05-05-2013, 02:40 PM   #104
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I like your analogy of the thoroughbred horse. You could use a Dashew as a camera boat to film deadliest catch, a real work horse. I doubt the Hinckley type boats would make it out of Dutch Harbour, great looks but fragile.
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Old 05-05-2013, 06:51 PM   #105
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Was aboard a friend's Eastbay 38 (or was it a 39) last year. Workmanship and materials were first rate.

The ride at 30 kts in a 2' chop was impressively smooth as I would suspect the Sabre's to be.

But I do not lilke the sheerline of the Eastbay line. The Sabre is a tad bit better (sorry Don). Both just a bit too straight line to please my eye. (But I would kick neither out of my boathouse).

The Hinckley sheerline is more pleasing but the quality is not so much better than the Eastbay or Sabre to justify the significantly higher price.

I have seen a couple of Vicems and they are really gorgeous. Fairly straight sheer but enough length to carry it off well (if that makes sense).

Both the Hinckleys and the Vicems carry an awful snobbism price penalty IMHO.

I'd rather go for something like the Spencer Lincoln designed Zimmerman 38 or one of its numerous Downeast siblings (like a Wesmac 38) and give up 10kts for something just as seakindly and more pleasing to my eye.

My 2 cents FWIW.
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Old 05-05-2013, 07:43 PM   #106
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Giggitoni's photo showing proper (small) trawler wakes.



Interestingly, the saloon roofs of Pineapple Girl and FlyWright, and the Coot's pilothouse roof are all aligned with the top of the levee.

This photo is for Marin:

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Old 05-05-2013, 09:47 PM   #107
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YES David Hawkins,
Those lobster type boats look great but I see they have extremely wide sterns.
Do the older LBs have narrow beams? How a bout a 1950 LB? In the 50s they only had flathead six cyl engines of 80 to 100hp. Must have had narrower beams.
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Old 05-05-2013, 10:20 PM   #108
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As money seems to not be an issue, don't forget to also look at Mochi Craft's Dolphin 44. To me, it's a classic meets modern design.

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Old 05-06-2013, 10:12 AM   #109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marin View Post
God yes. The boat in your photo looks like a shoebox with a pointy end. At least that's the way I perceive it.
Marin, out here, with our kind of sun strength and hours, the lack of any side window and cockpit protection would rule the Eastbay and Hinkley off the list immediately. The are clearly a harbour type of gentlemen's pleasure cruiser, look nice, but just not protected enough for serious off-shore travel and cruising. Being one who extoles the flexibility/functionality of the covered, (enclosable), cockpit as a virtue, I would have thought the design would appeal.
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Old 05-06-2013, 10:49 AM   #110
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Originally Posted by dwhatty View Post
Was aboard a friend's Eastbay 38 (or was it a 39) last year. Workmanship and materials were first rate.

The ride at 30 kts in a 2' chop was impressively smooth as I would suspect
The Eastbay (39) I was on was very impressive but the cockpit was not. There were steps up to the salon & it didn't really lend itself to "fishing." The ride at 30 knots was extremely smooth but the salon was not agreeable to my wife. I love the lines, however, but other than a lot more speed, it was not that much better than SeaHorse II.

(Typing on this iPad really sucks!)
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Old 05-06-2013, 02:27 PM   #111
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Being one who extoles the flexibility/functionality of the covered, (enclosable), cockpit as a virtue, I would have thought the design would appeal.
I do like a covered aft deck which is why the Europa-style boat, preferably in a pilothouse configuration, is my favorite for a recreational cruising boat. But the cover in the boat in the photo looks like my dog designed it and I made it. I'm not a fan of the afterthought, homemade look which is certainly how the cover in the photo appears to me, and it gives the whole boat a "cheap" look, not that the boat itself is anything to write home about. To me, there's nothing interesting or unique about the design, at least not from that angle. It looks like a very Plain Jane cookie cutter production boat that's attempting to capture the lines of the really good express cruisers.
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Old 05-06-2013, 03:43 PM   #112
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I would put a Sabre up against an Eastbay in build quality any day. An Eastbay is a wonderful boat, but so is a Sabre. And some of us do feel a little better about boats built here versus abroad. I do believe their lineage has spoken for itself.

Walt, I say go for it!!! I know you love Seahorse and a very fine boat it is. But I know the lack of speed nags at you. A Sabre would certainly be worthy of "nicest boat on the dock" while delivering the performance you desire. I know you have been through a lot of boats to whittle it down to the right boat...that is what we do. But you're not quite there yet!!!...
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Old 05-06-2013, 03:53 PM   #113
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I would put a Sabre up against an Eastbay in build quality any day.
There is a Sabre dealer in our marina and my wife and I have toured some of their models over the years. Very nice boats but in our estimation not even in the same ballpark in terms of quality of construction and attention to detail, particularly in the interior, as an Eastbay.

The Sabres are very nice, no question. But it was apparent in the fit of cabinetry that was "just a little bit off," to the thought (or lack thereof) behind the placement of various interior components that the overall quality was not up to the standards found in an Eastbay (several of which we have also examined quite closely).

There were elements of the Sabres that smacked of "we'll do it this way because it's cheaper and easier to do (which in the long run can mean a lower price). There was none of this on the Eastbay's we've been on. Everywhere we looked there was no compromise in anything. Of course, you pay for that extreme attention to detail and very high quality of materials and components.

I've also been aboard a Hinkley Picnic Boat and it, in terms of fit and finish, is in a league of its own as is its price for what you get in terms of size and accommodations.
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