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Old 04-29-2013, 03:43 PM   #21
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Ray I agree but there are big differences between what one thinks is an acceptable maneuver or wake and what the next guy thinks. Look at this thread. I thought the planing hull passing Mark was smart assed and dangerous behavior not to mention rude and others think it's business as usual.

Anode,
I almost never take wakes from behind. It takes forever.

Marin I think Bayliners would be lighter by far than GBs and the newer GB have big power to make wakes. A high powered GB w lots of power would make a huge wake. Cars and boats at speed? Bad analogy.
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Old 04-29-2013, 03:58 PM   #22
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Ya gotta love California.


Big:
  • wakes
  • taxes
  • public pensions
  • population
  • state government debt
  • worries over nothing
  • fuel prices
  • hopes for pure E cars
Little:
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  • opportunity for business growth
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Old 04-29-2013, 04:01 PM   #23
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Getting waked is part of inside cruising. Usually it's too much activity in a small space then what is comfortable.

That's why we try and only go out during the week.

Another thing are the idiots who anchor right inside or just outside a high speed channel. When you go by at 20 knots they will scream obscene words and give you the single finger salute. What's that all about?

And don't forget the water skiers who only have limited areas where they can achieve the needed speed in order to ski. Those pesky buggers are always cutting in front of you. What happens if they fall?

So on & Scooby do...
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Old 04-29-2013, 04:13 PM   #24
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For a wide, flat-transomed boat like a GB turning into a big wake results in much less "shoving around" than turning away from it. We've tried it both ways and turn into the wake results--- in our boat, at least--- in far less rolling. Lots of pitching, of course, if the wake is high, but little to no rolling.
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Old 04-29-2013, 04:50 PM   #25
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For a wide, flat-transomed boat like a GB turning into a big wake results in much less "shoving around" than turning away from it. We've tried it both ways and turn into the wake results--- in our boat, at least--- in far less rolling. Lots of pitching, of course, if the wake is high, but little to no rolling.
A little throttle into the wake helps significantly
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Old 04-29-2013, 05:01 PM   #26
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Lots of pitching, of course, if the wake is high, but little to no rolling.
I don't alter course or speed and there's almost no effect of a wake on the Halvorsen 32.
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Old 04-29-2013, 05:21 PM   #27
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I don't alter course or speed and there's almost no effect of a wake on the Halvorsen 32.
Walt - I deal with a 65' Sunseeker almost every time I go out. Guaranteed to spill your drink.
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Old 04-29-2013, 05:26 PM   #28
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Hmmm....unless the wake from a passing boat is huge, I turn the bow away from the wake at a 45 degree angle and take it from behind.. unless other traffic prevents it. Requires a less dramatic turn and time than trying to turn into a passing wake. Works for me.
This was in response to Mark's picture in the original post. I'm not good enough to get a boat turned into these wakes....
Eric - Don't worry you won't have to wait long.
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Old 04-29-2013, 05:34 PM   #29
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Taking a passing wake on the stern @ a 45 degree angle? Not me...I much prefer to go bow first into passing wakes but still @ a 45 degree angle.
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Old 04-29-2013, 05:52 PM   #30
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Taking a passing wake on the stern @ a 45 degree angle? Not me...I much prefer to go bow first into passing wakes but still @ a 45 degree angle.
Look at the original picture ...you can make a 90 degree course change and take this wakes on your bow?...
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Old 04-29-2013, 06:11 PM   #31
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Look at the original picture ...you can make a 90 degree course change and take this wakes on your bow?...


Mark, is that my wake in the picture with me in your 10:00 position out of frame?

If so, it gives you an idea of how close he passed to me...barely a boat length. Not enough time or room to make the turn to port, and Coot and the shore to stbd preventing a stbd turn.
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Old 04-29-2013, 06:15 PM   #32
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The wake from a boat passing us close in the same direction as in the original photo we would take on our stern quarter by turning away from it a bit. Chip is correct in that making a near 90 degree turn to take that wake bow-on is not practical or possible.

The only times we have turned to take a wake from a same-direction boat on the bow is when it's been one of the aforementioned plowing sleds like a big Bayliner, Tollycraft, etc. and the resulting wake is simply monstrous. Then we do everything we need to do to take their near-vertical wave faces bow-on rather than on the stern quarter.

But for the wakes of boats passing us going the other direction or crossing us we always take it on the bow, usually at an angle of 20 to 30 degrees off the waves (as opposed to 45). At this angle the boat mostly pitches. There is very little to no rolling.
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Old 04-29-2013, 06:19 PM   #33
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Old 04-29-2013, 06:37 PM   #34
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Yes, in the perfect world I would take every wake on the bow. But....it ain't perfect and sometimes it's best to show it your backside.
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Old 04-29-2013, 06:49 PM   #35
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Mark, is that my wake in the picture with me in your 10:00 position out of frame?
Now that you mention it, I believe so.
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Old 04-29-2013, 06:51 PM   #36
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Taking a wake head on is not good at all. Gonn'a get slammed for sure that way.

If you take a wake at a shallow angle that's off from perfectly aligned (as in aligned w the wake waves) there will be an angle that will produce no rolling at all. Say you turned slightly to port. took the first wave on the port chine and the boat rolls a bit CW. Then AC until the port chine contacts the 2nd wave. At that instant the 1st wave is under stbd stern quarter and each time a wave tries to push up the port chine fwd it's balanced by the next wave under the stbd stern quarter. So when ever a wave is under a corner of the boat there is a wave under the other corner of the boat and no rolling results. The trick is to guess what angle will produce wave support under opposite corners of the boat. Basically for very small boat wakes (that have wake waves very close together) just off from broadside works best. Or even broadside for some. As the distance between the waves get longer from bigger boats the ideal crossing angle gets wider and wider but for most wakes a fairly shallow angle is best. You can see it and feel it. If a wake rocks your boat you've got the wrong angle and there's no wave under your outboard (looking back from where you came from) quarter. It takes practice to get fairly good at guessing the angle.

When you get it right it's like magic. All those waves passing under your boat and she moves not at all.
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Old 04-29-2013, 07:31 PM   #37
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I'll have to concur with Eric on that one.....and I try to do exactly that. Trouble is that on routes like the ACICW, there are places so narrow between West Palm Beach and Fort Lauderdale, for example, where there is no option but to eat the wakes on the beam. To turn into a wake, one is likely to get broad-sided by the guy chasing him, and in my weekend ICW transits these last couple of months, I'm sometimes passed by as many as six boats at a time, with three on each side. My boat takes wakes equally well from bow or stern, but sometimes the only choice is to just hold on.
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Old 04-30-2013, 12:56 PM   #38
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We see that every time we leave the marina and get outside the no wake zone. Channel is narrow for about 2 miles and tons of traffic on the weekends (largest East Coast SeaRay dealer is on our river). The Tug certainly takes it better than the sailboat. We usually shoot for 45 degrees of the bow, but often can't make the turn due to traffic. That is when I shout "hold on." At least it serves to keep any gunk from forming on the bottom of the tanks. The worst experience we ever had was on a day with no traffic, so plenty of room for a pass, and a guy in a large sport fisher came so close to the sailboat that we were drawn into his propwash. That was good for the pucker factor. And, of course, he did so with all smiles and a big friendly wave . . .
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Old 05-02-2013, 07:47 PM   #39
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What we are really talking about is courtesy and performing a slow, coordinated pass. Those are two things we don't often experience here.
ANd please tell me what that is? I am usually the "waker". I do my very best to contact the "wakee" on the radio. 9 times out of 10 I cannot raise them on the radio. I still try to give a slow wake pass. BUT IT IS PRETTY DAMN HARD TO PASS A BOAT WITH NO WAKE WHEN THAT WAKEE IS GOING 7 KNOTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

IF YOU EVER SEE A LARGE POWERBOAT SLOW DOWN IN AN EFFORT TO PROVIDE YOU A COURTEOUS PASS, PLEASE RETURN THE FAVOR BY REDUCING YOUR POWER TO MINIMUM STEERAGE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

There is a big annual event down here called the "Spring Fling". It is mostly sailboats...hundreds of them....and they all end up in the ICW strewn out for 50 miles. I do not want to go sailboat speed for 50 friggin miles!!! SO I mentioned to the guy that was running the skipper's to mention the proper way to "accept" a slow pass.....and he looked at me like I had 3 heads. Completely lost on him!!!
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Old 05-02-2013, 07:49 PM   #40
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If anything can deal with the wake from a passing fast boat it's a sailboat. So I wouldn't worry about it. Just open it up and go.
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