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Old 03-06-2015, 12:30 AM   #81
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Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
Just curious ... synthetic vs conventional oil, plus all these oil additives not intended for combustion ... does not any of these affects the engine?
Apparently not or I would think it would be a reason to void the warranty. Plus oils does commonly get into the combustion chamber on older engines.

You have to remember I'm not talking about adding used oil in mass quantities all the time. It's a very small amount once in a while that you prefiler to get the course stuff out. I only presented it as a way to recoop some of the money spent on the oil, a way to deal with it as opposed to storing it on board when cruising and as a excepted alternative to carting it off to the recycler. Especially if you put a lot of hours on your main engine and/or Genset.

Do it, don't do it, believe it, don't believe it, I don't care. But it is and has been done and engines dont seem to be dieing untimely deaths right and left because of it. Is it something you want to do with a modern common rail engine? I doubt it. But an old work horse like a Lehman? I can't really see nor seen the harm. And as far as doing so causing you to have to change you're fuel filters more often, now I'm the one laughing.
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Old 03-06-2015, 12:35 AM   #82
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It is great seeing people wanting to adopt solar. I did my own, the boat has not burned, the batteries love it, I run what I call the 12v "day fridge" on 180 watts of panel. It is another means of getting amps, the first cost is it, and you save by extending batt life. But unless you go in with lots of panel and batts it is not exclusive, I would not be without the genset, never going to run the mains voltage compressor (240) for the eutectic fridge and freezer without one.
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Old 03-06-2015, 02:44 AM   #83
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Mark, when you don't have a choice, there's no decision to make. I'll take options any day. I like a Plan A, a Plan B and then the option for a possible Plan C. When it comes to living on the hook for a couple of weeks, options are a very good thing!
Al, there is Option Z: running the electrical cord from your generator to the genset-absent Coot while "cuddled" to FlyWright. By the way, what is the exchange rate of gasoline (powering the generator) to IPA beer? One gallon for four beers?
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Old 03-06-2015, 07:25 AM   #84
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Al, there is Option Z: running the electrical cord from your generator to the genset-absent Coot while "cuddled" to FlyWright. By the way, what is the exchange rate of gasoline (powering the generator) to IPA beer? One gallon for four beers?
Mark, it's funny you mention that. One of my electrical additions is a 30amp shore power female recepticle behind one of the small access doors on the inside wall of the back deck. I will likely only put a 20 amp breaker on the circuit. Have A couple of buddies with boats that lack generators. Thought it would be nice to share some ac when we get together. Pretty inexpensive addition if you're doing it yourself.

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Old 03-06-2015, 10:20 AM   #85
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[QUOTE=Capt.Bill11;

Do it, don't do it, believe it, don't believe it, I don't care. But it is and has been done and engines dont seem to be dieing untimely deaths right and left because of it. Is it something you want to do with a modern common rail engine? I doubt it. But an old work horse like a Lehman? I can't really see nor seen the harm. And as far as doing so causing you to have to change you're fuel filters more often, now I'm the one laughing.[/QUOTE]

What Bill suggests is not new. Obviously how it is done is debatable. Think bio diesel fuel. For commercial fuel suppliers in the bio fuel game oil, cleaning before end use includes the use of centrifuges, not unlike an Alfa Laval system used on larger vessels. Used oil has a lot of debris that the centrifuge picks out. Once cleaned, used oil is used for all sorts of purposes, including ultimately destined for diesel fuel end users.
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Old 03-06-2015, 10:35 AM   #86
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I've decided to pour old-oil into the fuel tank of my 1967 Wildcat 430 cid / 360 hp engine at each oil change - NOT!

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Old 03-06-2015, 11:02 AM   #87
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I have read countless engine manuals over the years. Vehicles, outboards, marine diesels, reciprocating airplane engines from Lycoming, Continental, and Pratt & Whitney. Lawn mowers, chain saws, generators.

And with the exception of the two stroke engines that instruct one to mix CLEAN 2-stroke oil into the fuel, not ONE of these manuals ever said "After you have drained the crankcase of the old, contaminated lube oil please pour it into your fuel tank so your engine can run on it and you can save a couple of bucks."

Whether it kills the Lehman or not, it sure isn't going to help it. It will also clog up the fuel filters faster so one might negate the savings in fuel cost by the cost of more frequent filter changes.



Oh, he knows they do and mentioned such in our phone call. But he said that this doesn't make it a good idea. It's to accomodate people-- mostly big companies according to him-- who for whatever reason are trying everything they can to cut costs. That's one way to do it.

So your go through filters faster and you accelerate some of your maintenance costs, but the savings look great on paper and the engine manufacturers are more than happy to accomdate their customers who buy bazilions of dollars woth of engine parts and support over the years. "Want to cycle your old lube oil through your engines? Hey, have at it. It just means we'll make more money off of you down the road."

So says he, anyway, and he was in the business a long, long time.
I grew up on a farm and we used old burnt oil to lubricate the chain on our chainsaws, and indeed to mix with the petrol(gas) to make up the 2str mixture.

Over hundreds and hundreds of hours we never had any problems.....
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Old 03-06-2015, 11:33 AM   #88
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I've decided to pour old-oil into the fuel tank of my 1967 Wildcat 430 cid / 360 hp engine at each oil change - NOT!

How did a thread regarding running a Genny turn into pouring used oil into your fuel tank??? Thread Hijack????
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Old 03-06-2015, 11:37 AM   #89
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How did a thread regarding running a Genny turn into pouring used oil into your fuel tank??? Thread Hijack????

It's this guys fault.

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Old 03-06-2015, 11:38 AM   #90
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So back to gennys, RUN THEM!!!!!!
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Old 03-06-2015, 12:07 PM   #91
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Al, there is Option Z: running the electrical cord from your generator to the genset-absent Coot while "cuddled" to FlyWright. By the way, what is the exchange rate of gasoline (powering the generator) to IPA beer? One gallon for four beers?
That is an option as well. The conversion rate from gasoline to IPA is a complex and fluid computation...one with many variables and few restrictions. The one constant in the formula (K) is IPA. Bottom line, as long as the generator is running, ensure adequate amounts of IPA are available for the crew of the electrical host vessel. When the generator stops, so does the IPA flow. With a few exceptions, when the IPA flow stops, so does the generator.

It's a symbiotic relationship of mutual benefit. I love the idea!!
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Old 03-06-2015, 12:17 PM   #92
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I've powered other boats while rafted to them. I carry a variety of cord adapters and always have been able to rig something up. Got them powered up and got them some ac to sleep with.

THEY certainly did not gripe about the noise!!
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Old 03-06-2015, 12:29 PM   #93
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It's this guys fault.

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Old 03-06-2015, 01:47 PM   #94
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I wrote an entire post that I lost when I closed the page inadvertently.

Must be an omen, so I will only say, some people don't know what they don't know, but write about it in any case.

If nothing else, get out of the house, do a little reading, open your eyes to the world around you.
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Old 03-06-2015, 06:09 PM   #95
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My used oil source said cleaning up motor oil makes them compatible with type A boiler fuels but not compatible with bio diesel. Sorry for the wrong statement I made earlier.
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Old 03-06-2015, 08:13 PM   #96
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I have read countless engine manuals over the years. Vehicles, outboards, marine diesels, reciprocating airplane engines from Lycoming, Continental, and Pratt & Whitney. Lawn mowers, chain saws, generators.

And with the exception of the two stroke engines that instruct one to mix CLEAN 2-stroke oil into the fuel, not ONE of these manuals ever said "After you have drained the crankcase of the old, contaminated lube oil please pour it into your fuel tank so your engine can run on it and you can save a couple of bucks."
Now that is funny.
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Old 03-06-2015, 08:16 PM   #97
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(For Marin. Scroll to bottom.)

How To Change your oil
  1. 1
    Lift your car. Use either jacks or ramps. On a flat even surface, place the parking brake on and jack your car up, bracing it with jack stands. Improper jack-placement can damage your car badly, so always refer to the owner's manual for the instructions for your specific car. It's also extremely dangerous to work under a car that's still on a jack, so make sure you brace it first.
    • If you want to use ramps to lift your car, make sure you brace the back tires with blocks. Have someone to spot as you drive up the ramps, to make sure you don't drive off the other end.
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  2. 2
    Let car heat up a bit to get the oil warm. 2 or 3 minutes of idling should be sufficient to get the oil churned up a bit so it will drain more quickly. Solid particles of dirt and grime are caught in the oil and tend to settle to the bottom when the oil is cold. Letting it run ensures you're getting the crankcase cleaned out thoroughly.
    • While the car idles, assemble the necessary tools. You'll need your new oil, a new filter, a pan and newspaper to catch the draining oil, and probably a socket wrench and a flashlight. Consult your owner's manual to determine the type of oil and filter you'll need.
    • Any auto shop will also be able to tell you the kind of oil and type of filter you'll need as long as you provide them with the make and model of your car.
  3. 3
    Remove the oil cap. Open the hood and locate the oil cap on top of the engine. This is where you'll add oil after you're done draining the old oil. Doing this will help the oil drain more easily because air can flow in as the crankcase empties.

  4. 4
    Find the oil pan. Under your car, look for a flat metal pan closer to the engine than the transmission. It should have a bolt or plug toward the bottom. This is the oil plug you'll need to remove to let the oil drain. Directly under the plug, place your pan and a couple of newspapers for catching the oil.
    • If you can't distinguish the oil pan from the transmission pan, let the car run for five or ten minutes. The oil plug should get warm to the touch by that time, while the transmission won't.

  5. 5
    Remove the oil plug. Loosen the plug counter-clockwise using the proper sized socket or crescent wrench if you've got room to maneuver. You should also remove and replace the circular paper (or felt) drain plug gasket, but a metal washer can be re-used if in good condition.
    • The oil will come out of the pan as soon as you do this, and it will come at a slight angle, so it can be tricky to catch. Once you've loosened the plug with your wrench, remove it the rest of the way with your hand. Make sure you've got your big catch-pan and newspapers placed before you remove the plug. Also be careful not to drop the plug in the oil, it's a messy job trying to find the plug in the black stuff. If you do drop it in the pan, you can easily find it with a magnet. Ideally, use the type that is at the end of an expandable rod.
    • Another easy way to "save" the drain plug is to use a funnel with a bit of screening in it. Catch the plug as it falls out. You can then pull the funnel out of the way of the stream and set it to one side.
    • If you need more leverage to remove the oil plug, an extension such as a pipe segment on your ratchet handle can help. If this type of "breaker-bar" arrangement is required it was way too tight.
    • You'll probably get oil on your hands and clothes at some point during this process. Putting down newspaper is a smart precaution, or else you'll have big oil stains on your driveway or garage you'll have to clean up.

  6. 6
    Wait. It will take several minutes for all the oil to drain out of the car. When the oil has ceasing running out of the crankcase, replace the plug. Hand tighten to make sure you're not cross-threading the oil plug when you screw it back in, and tighten the rest of the way with your wrench. Don't forget to install a replacement gasket or washer.
    • While you're poking around under the car, though, take a minute to locate the blue or white-colored cylinder that is the oil filter. You'll need to replace this next.

Part 2 of 4: Replacing the Oil Filter

  1. 1
    Locate the filter assembly. Filters are not put in a standard position, so they can be on the front, back or side of engines depending on the model. Look at the replacement filter you purchased to have some idea of what to look for. Typically, they're white, blue, or black cylinders about 4–6 inches (10.2–15.2 cm) long and 3 inches (7.6 cm) wide, like a soup can.
    • Some vehicles such as BMW, Mercedes, and newer Volvos may have a filter element or cartridge as opposed to the simpler spin-on type. They require you to open the cap of a built-in resevoir and lift out the filter element itself.

  2. 2
    Unscrew the oil filter. Get a good grip and twist slow and steadily, counter-clockwise. The plastic coating and grease in the engine compartment often makes the filter somewhat slippery, but it shouldn't be more than hand-tight. Use a rag or mechanics gloves with a grip to help. A filter wrench is basically a rubber belt you grip the filter with, which you could fasten from an old belt of yours or an old alternator belt you've got laying around the garage.
    • Make sure the pan is still under the car catching the spilling oil. There will be some trapped in the filter that will come out when you unscrew it.
    • When removing the oil filter, make sure that the rubber gasket ring comes off with the filter. If it sticks to the car, the new filter won't seal properly and will leak. If it does stick, peel it off with your fingers or use a screwdriver to scrape off any sticky bits.
    • To avoid spilling too much oil as you remove the filter, you can wrap a plastic bag around the filter, which will catch any oil that escapes as you remove it. Let it sit upside down in the bag to drain as you complete the job.

  3. 3
    Prepare the new filter. Dip the tip of your finger in the new replacement oil and smear it on the gasket ring of the new filter. This will lubricate the gasket and create a good seal for the new filter, and ensure that you'll be able to get it off the next time.
    • You can also pour a tiny amount of oil into the filter prior to installing it. This will reduce the amount of time your car takes to regain proper oil pressure. If your filter is mounted vertically, you may be able to fill it almost to the top. If mounted at an angle then a little oil will spill just prior to spinning the filter on but that will not amount too much.

  4. 4
    Carefully screw on the new, lubricated filter, being careful to not cross the threads. The filter will generally say how tight to tighten it, so look to the specifications on the box for more specific instructions. In general, you'll tighten the filter until the gasket touches, then a quarter-turn more.


Part 3 of 4: Adding New Oil


  1. 1
    Add new oil to the car at the fill hole. The amount you need is in the owner's manual, usually listed under "capacities."
    • If you hold the bottle with the spout on top, it will pour more smoothly, without bubbling.
    • Make sure you're adding the correct oil. Typically, you can safely add 10W-30 to most cars in a pinch, but you should consult your owner's manual or the experts at an auto shop before adding oil.
    • Don't always rely on the dipstick for an accurate measurement; it can be off, especially if the engine has just been run (the stick will read low because there is still oil in the galleries). If you want to check the stick accurately, just check it first thing in the morning, parked on a level surface, when it's cold and settled.

  2. 2
    Replace the fill cap. Check around for any loose tools you might have left around and close the hood.
    • It's a good idea to wipe up any spills as best you can. While it's not dangerous to get a little oil on the crankcase as you're pouring, it may smoke as the engine heats up, leading to that burning oil smell that can be momentarily frightening. It can also make your interior smell bad.
  3. 3
    Start the engine. Watch to be sure the oil pressure light goes off after start-up. Put your car in park or neutral with the parking brake on to check for any drips and look carefully under the car to check for any leaks or drips. If the filter and drain plug aren't tight, they may leak slowly. Run the engine for a minute or so to get the pressure up and ensure you've installed everything correctly.
  4. 4
    Reset the oil change light. This will differ depending upon the make and model of your car, so you should consult the owner's manual to figure out the specific set of steps. On most GM cars, for instance, you'll need to shut the car off and then turn the ignition on without turning the car over. Next, pump the gas pedal three times in ten seconds. When you start the car back up, the lights should be reset.
  5. 5 After you have drained the crankcase of the old, contaminated lube oil please pour it into your fuel tank so your engine can run on it and you can save a couple of bucks.
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Old 03-06-2015, 08:19 PM   #98
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Used oil should fuel oil-fired steam locomotives! Two-truck Shay (geared) locomotive leaving Felton, CA:


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Old 03-06-2015, 08:32 PM   #99
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Used oil should fuel oil-fired steam locomotives! Two-truck Shay (geared) locomotive leaving Felton, CA:
Now THIS is a great idea.
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Old 03-06-2015, 11:29 PM   #100
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http://www.youtube.com/embed/OCNeTOyyA7w

http://www.x-change-r.com/oil2Fuel/oil2Fuel.shtml
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