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Old 05-24-2018, 12:39 PM   #1
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Run fore and aft slip lines in the slip from pilings to dock?

I was just thinking of this idea for my slip. I have lots or rope I can use to do that, but have never done it, not in 20 years of boating. I was thinking maybe it helps to get the boat back into the slip? Since I have twins, its not been much trouble, but if one engine has quit could make it easier.

But also if your dock line came loose, I was thinking such a line might help keep the boat from accidently touching a slipmates boat in normal wind not storm conditions.

Any negatives to doing this?
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Old 05-24-2018, 12:55 PM   #2
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A lot depends on how the pilings are configured in that marina.

I've been in many marinas where people rig a fixed line from the outer most pilings to the midship pilings. Then also run fixed lines from the midship pilings back to the pilings on the dock. Obviously, it depends on the piling configuration.

These can be used as grab lines for the crew to prevent drifting into a neighboring boat, or to pull yourself in. I've never seen one prevent a bump from a snapped line. To do so, they would typically have to be strung fairly low and that makes them tough to reach for the crew. Honestly, if you're snapping dock lines, there are problems. Lines snap for very specific reasons:

undersized lines
insufficient lines
old lines exceeding life cycle
insufficient chafe protection

I've only ever seen lines snap in extreme weather conditions, and only as a result of one or more of the reasons listed above. (e.g. lack of chafe protection leads to the line prematurely reaching the end of service). We spent many years in a very rough and very exposed marina. We've ridden Hurricane Irene with 3-4 foot breaking waves rolling through a marina with fixed docks. I had 16 lines on my boat and 10 fenders.

No damage to our boat at all. I've spent countless days and nights over many years running up and down the docks in that marina securing boats with snapped lines, or who were banging against the dock or other boats.
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Old 05-24-2018, 01:13 PM   #3
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Not snapped a line yet. I use 3/4 " line on my 37 foot Egg Harbor, and it is under 20000 lbs. I have replaced and spliced worn lines.

A line could be rigged low down to catch the side of the hull. Of course boat goes up and down with the tide.

Last week I screwed a 2x4 to the piling with 2 screwed on standoffs shaped to fit the curve of the piling. The slip is tighter than I like, and there is this big bolt and nut that holds the finger pier ends to the piling, and it has been occasional rubbing my painted hull, which I now need to add some paint. I tried fenders but they did not help much, they would slip out of the way. I had 3 fenders and one tied around the finger pier.

Next time out there I can post a picture, but so far it works really well to protect my boat. Now my SS rub rails can rub that 2x4 and not the nut or finger pier.

A possible solution would have been a fender board, but this is better, and the marina owners do not care.

Here is old pic of the bolt, now a 2x4x8 foot covers it entirely, i drilled a hole in 2x4 to slip it around that nut. One advantage I noticed, it gives me a handhold at 2x4 top to grab onto getting off the boat.
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Old 05-24-2018, 01:36 PM   #4
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Ugg. That rim joist should be doubled up, and the bolt, washer, and nut should be recessed into a pocket so the face of the outermost joist is flush. That is a horrible design. Either an oversight or an attempt to reduce labor and/or material costs.

My point in the height is the line would need to be low if you are trying to make a passive 'rail' in the event the line snaps. It would really need to be around waist to chest high for a crew to be able to exert some leverage and avoid hanging dangerously over the gunnel to grab and use the line.

Of the two, the probability of crew using are high, while the probability of a line snapping is very low. I'd personally opt for the line to be higher so the crew can effectively and safely use it.

If you want both, consider running two sets of lines, one low and the other higher.
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Old 05-24-2018, 01:47 PM   #5
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Yes, poor design, all the slips are the same setup. Normally it wont rub that nut, but if the wind blows just right and hard, it does. The slip is maybe 16 foot width, but you have allow the boat to move with the tides.

with the 2x4 lined up running like the piling, the ss rub rails, I have an upper and lower on the hul, l can handle it now.
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Old 05-24-2018, 03:53 PM   #6
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I've seen people rig two lines, one from each piling on the fairway to a centerline cleat in the berth. Or crossing to near the opposite corner in the berth. Pulled fairly tight. The idea (I was told) is that it guides the boat into the slip, and if the tension is right will stop it before you strike the end. The two lines form an "X" with the cross nearer the closed end of the berth. You drive into this and the crossing lines stop the bow somewhere near the middle. I've not tried it myself, but it seems like it might work.
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Old 05-24-2018, 07:45 PM   #7
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Lots of sail boaters in Our marina do this. They call them neighbor lines.
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Old 05-24-2018, 10:13 PM   #8
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Blah Blah. Sticking to boating topics, and take the cultural stuff somewhere else.
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Old 05-25-2018, 09:27 AM   #9
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Besslb,, my comment was not directed at you. Maerin posted a comment after yours that I was responding to, that the moderators subsequently deleted for good reason.
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Old 05-25-2018, 10:22 AM   #10
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Old 05-25-2018, 11:32 AM   #11
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One general comment I would make about one's home slip. Do whatever necessary to make it the most perfect and secure tie up and docking possible. Extra padding or protection on the slip or on the corners or on the pilings. Lines set up and easy to attach. Double lines. You should be storm or hurricane secure. You should have systems to detect and notify you of problems from water ingress to fire to theft. Cruising you encounter different situations, but spend the time making home perfect.
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Old 05-25-2018, 12:38 PM   #12
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I always rig my slip(s) in that manner; lines from the outermost piling to the dock. On more than one occasion I found them very helpful in getting the boat in or out of the slip. Especially on windy days.
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Old 05-25-2018, 01:13 PM   #13
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I always rig my slip(s) in that manner; lines from the outermost piling to the dock. On more than one occasion I found them very helpful in getting the boat in or out of the slip. Especially on windy days.
What height are your lines off the water, are they at hand height while on the boat?
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Old 05-26-2018, 07:51 AM   #14
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What height are your lines off the water, are they at hand height while on the boat?



Depends on the tide! :-)


Which puts the lines between my waist and my shoulders while standing on the deck. You'll be able to tell where to put them, as I expect you'll be standing on your boat while attaching them to the outer pilings.
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Old 05-26-2018, 08:25 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdowney717 View Post
I was just thinking of this idea for my slip. I have lots or rope I can use to do that, but have never done it, not in 20 years of boating. I was thinking maybe it helps to get the boat back into the slip? Since I have twins, its not been much trouble, but if one engine has quit could make it easier.

But also if your dock line came loose, I was thinking such a line might help keep the boat from accidently touching a slipmates boat in normal wind not storm conditions.

Any negatives to doing this?

We installed lines like that to "help" our slip neighbor quit hitting our boat when he docked.

Then the marina re-did our side of the dock a few years ago, dredging, new piles, etc. and as an outcome of that we ended up with an additional pile in the sequence... which makes it more difficult for him to hit us now. I didn't re-install the end-to-end line, but we still keep an eye on him... he mostly just bounces his boat off the piles, now...

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Old 05-26-2018, 09:08 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by ranger42c View Post
We installed lines like that to "help" our slip neighbor quit hitting our boat when he docked.

Then the marina re-did our side of the dock a few years ago, dredging, new piles, etc. and as an outcome of that we ended up with an additional pile in the sequence... which makes it more difficult for him to hit us now. I didn't re-install the end-to-end line, but we still keep an eye on him... he mostly just bounces his boat off the piles, now...

-Chris
If for some reason one of my stern lines came loose, my boat would drift over and bump my slipmates boat, so I think having one low down is worth doing for me.
My boat is a lot bigger and heavier and more solid than theirs, and I dont want something to happen, even though nothing has yet. I could also hang a fender.
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Old 05-26-2018, 11:10 AM   #17
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We had a four step boarding stair with hand rail. I would attach a dock line with an unwrapped quick release knot so it can be grabbed as we drift past. It was helpful in a double loaded slip. My stable mate was in there before me with his 46 foot sailboat and he had three giant fenders at least four feet long between us. Smart.
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Old 05-26-2018, 11:54 AM   #18
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Here is my 2x4 add on to the piling.
This forum flips pictures, the ones I upload are upright.

It also adds a working useful handhold.
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Old 05-27-2018, 01:14 AM   #19
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I am really surprised when I see all the stuff that upi folks attach to the pilings in your home slips. Here in the PNW, there is no way a marina will let you screw anything into a piling as it will shorten its life. I own my slip and (condo) and the HOA rules forbid even attaching anything to the floating docks.

Why the difference? Partly I would guess it is the tide. With large tide changes any modifications to a piling would either spend a lot of time underwater (and be covered with muscles and barnacles) or would be too high to reach much of the time.
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Old 05-27-2018, 07:35 AM   #20
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I am really surprised when I see all the stuff that upi folks attach to the pilings in your home slips. Here in the PNW, there is no way a marina will let you screw anything into a piling as it will shorten its life. I own my slip and (condo) and the HOA rules forbid even attaching anything to the floating docks.

Why the difference? Partly I would guess it is the tide. With large tide changes any modifications to a piling would either spend a lot of time underwater (and be covered with muscles and barnacles) or would be too high to reach much of the time.
I used small diameter torx head deck screws, 3.5 inch long, not bolts to hold on the 2x4. Those wont damage that big piling. Our tide runs from 3 to 4 feet. The 2x4 is not attached to the piling at the bottom, only the middle and top is attached.

I see lots of hooks screwed into pilings in this area.

I attached a hose reel for my water hose into the main dock facing my slip, very convenient, it fit perfect, matched up with the top and lower dock supports. Instead of a standard garden hose, I used an expanding hose, works well and is much lighter weight and more flexible.
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