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Old 04-12-2019, 01:00 AM   #1
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Ropes for dopes

So from previous research I learned that imported and domestic “nylon” lines can be any number of compositions having less than 100% nylon, and even some where spools are filled with flaws or are even multiple pieces adding up to X length on the spool. So, without basing quality on the most expensive material I can find, what are people using for nylon twisted lines? I see on amazon they offer Sea Strand brand at a good price, claiming to be nylon but is it quality?

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...DIPLBD69&psc=1

It seems to fit the right weight and includes some engineering data that makes it seem legit. $.40/ft is a lot better than what New England ropes wants for 5/8”.
I want this for anchor and mooring lines.

Or maybe there is something better nowadays like spectra?
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Old 04-12-2019, 01:34 AM   #2
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In my opinion New England Rope is the best with Sampson second. The rest is worth what you pay for it. It wonít last as long so in the end which is the better value?
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Old 04-12-2019, 02:44 AM   #3
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Often the difference between quality nylon rope and lower priced rope is that quality rope is pre-shrunk. Poor quality nylon rope feels very soft and nice in your hand. Good quality rope will feel firm and resist unlaying. The soft rope will chafe much easier. Buy New England or Sampson. Itís worth the difference.

Oddly enough the cheap soft rope usually ends up harder and less flexible than the quality rope that starts out harder.
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Old 04-12-2019, 05:46 AM   #4
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Think of any price difference as the cost of insurance for a good nights sleep, for a decade.
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Old 04-12-2019, 05:49 AM   #5
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New England Ropes is worth the extra cost, IMO. It's far superior. I have some cheap "nylon" rope that I use for fenders and stuff and when I heat cut it, it smells nothing like New England Ropes nylon. Guessing it's not even nylon...
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Old 04-12-2019, 06:19 AM   #6
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I tend to think the other way.


Things that wear or chafe, if you buy premium, it may still be one worthless because of a single, short lived moment.


99.5% of the time your lines are being used at a tiny fraction of their strength, and not being handled.


While I do notice a difference in lines, I haven't seen much difference in performance and I have used a lot of lines in my last 15 years of commercial work.



Usually failure or severe damage comes from extreme situations, not day to day docking. so being prepared for those extremes is more important no matter the lines.


When I say no matter the lines, I mean the list of normal brand names you see when buying anything marine. Bulk rope in strands I am less inclined to say all of it is suitable and certainly the cheap, spooled stuff you see in hardware stores you might want to test some first.


How many times have we all seen boats tied with tiny, who knows what line bobbing next to the rest of us like no big deal....until a storm, etc.....
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Old 04-12-2019, 07:47 AM   #7
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I have three strand dock lines that where on the boat when we bought it twelve years ago that we really like. They are very old but still soft and easy to handle and cleat. I have no idea the brand name but would definitely replace them with the same type if available.
These lines are nylon and might be 15-20 years old has anyone used this type line ?
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Old 04-12-2019, 08:00 AM   #8
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I won't skimp on ropes. I don't know and considering the variability of quality these days I can't trust unknown brands. I just bought 300' of 5/8 NE Rope for use with a secondary anchor. I'll never regret spending the money on quality rope.



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Old 04-12-2019, 08:00 AM   #9
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I have three strand dock lines that where on the boat when we bought it twelve years ago that we really like. They are very old but still soft and easy to handle and cleat. I have no idea the brand name but would definitely replace them with the same type if available.
These lines are nylon and might be 15-20 years old has anyone used this type line ?

It might be dacron which was a thing for a while.
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Old 04-12-2019, 09:23 AM   #10
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Years ago when Powerboat Reports was still around they did a test on line. One of the tests was for abrasion. They ran a line over a hacksaw blade with a sawsall and counted number of times the line went over it and measured % of line lost to abrasion. New England rope puts some type of coating on the line that reduces abrasion loss and PBR found that to be true. NER outperformed all of the others by far.
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Old 04-12-2019, 09:30 AM   #11
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Awesome responses thanks. I’m cheap by nature, but I’m also willing to pay for quality when warranted. Wether this is one of those times I am not sure yet. It might be a combination, with a few high quality ropes that sit in a locker and some lesser stuff that I use daily. Here in my waters we don’t get storms really, a wind of 25 gusting 35 is about the most we ever see.
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Old 04-12-2019, 09:46 AM   #12
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Here in my waters we donít get storms really, a wind of 25 gusting 35 is about the most we ever see.
Until it's more.

I buy most of my supplies at Defender, and I see they sell Samson and New England, so I'm sure I have some of each.
Any lines that look "suspect" I remove them from the boat and use them at home. Not that I really know they are bad, but I want lines I can trust on my boat. It's not uncommon to have tx storms with 75 mph gusts come out of nowhere.
Just like ground tackle, I want good stuff holding me in the slip.
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Old 04-12-2019, 09:50 AM   #13
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Until it's more.

I buy most of my supplies at Defender, and I see they sell Samson and New England, so I'm sure I have some of each.
Any lines that look "suspect" I remove them from the boat and use them at home. Not that I really know they are bad, but I want lines I can trust on my boat. It's not uncommon to have tx storms with 75 mph gusts come out of nowhere.
Just like ground tackle, I want good stuff holding me in the slip.
I believe you that itís not uncommon there, but here, it is extremely uncommon, like never. Our weather is brutally mild in all respects. But that doesnít mean cheap rope that shreds in a year is ultimately saving money or peace of mind.
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Old 04-12-2019, 10:01 AM   #14
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FYI,
Once rope is purchased and put on a boat and assigned or put to a job like being a mooring line it becomes a line. Mooring lines, anchor lines ect. Not mooring ropes or anchor ropes.
Stowed on a boat rope is just rope.

But I don’t know if it’s proper to call rope in the store line. I’d guess not but ?
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Old 04-12-2019, 10:24 AM   #15
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Tradition: Rope is called Line when taken aboard a vessel. Dock Lines, Anchor Lines, Fender Lines, etc. Sailing vessel give rope a name, main halyard, sheets, etc.
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Old 04-12-2019, 11:00 AM   #16
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Thanks HiDHo,
It’s kinda like engines and motors.
Few really care so it’s basically fly sh#t.
So I added the FYI to the post.
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Old 04-12-2019, 12:24 PM   #17
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Quote:
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Tradition: Rope is called Line when taken aboard a vessel. Dock Lines, Anchor Lines, Fender Lines, etc. Sailing vessel give rope a name, main halyard, sheets, etc.

Well, tradition like beauty is in the eye of the beholder.


I was taught by my Dad that rope is rope until it is assigned a purpose, I e. rode, dock line, Halyard, etc. His experience was all in "power". Mostly destroyers and one Essex class carrier.
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Old 04-12-2019, 12:41 PM   #18
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I have always held with the definition of when a rope goes aboard a vessel it becomes a line.
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Old 04-12-2019, 12:48 PM   #19
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I have always held with the definition of when a rope goes aboard a vessel it becomes a line.
Not if it's a rode, sheet, or a halyard...
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Old 04-12-2019, 01:24 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Nomad Willy View Post
FYI,
Once rope is purchased and put on a boat and assigned or put to a job like being a mooring line it becomes a line. Mooring lines, anchor lines ect. Not mooring ropes or anchor ropes.
Stowed on a boat rope is just rope.

But I donít know if itís proper to call rope in the store line. Iíd guess not but ?
Does it really matter? Maybe we should we rename this thread "Lines for Swines"?
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