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Old 09-12-2016, 08:06 AM   #21
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On my little boat I never go forward to retrieve or launch the anchor. I just sit on the bridge and push a button. The anchor always turns the right way. It's a Delta. I'm hoping the Vulcan anchor I'm switching to will do the same.
Parks

I'm always up front hosing the salt water, mud, kelp and critters off the chain as it comes in. A few nudges with the boat hook to rotate the anchor are routine. Each boat, pulpit, roller anchor size etc are different.

Then once anchor is up it is necessary to secure it in place so it doesn't do the deep six dance as happened to Marty's friend.
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Old 09-12-2016, 09:28 AM   #22
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How do the folks who retrieve from the helm wash down the chain and anchor as it comes up? If I retrieved form the helm I would be placing a ton of crap in the chain locker. Some 'splainin please.
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Old 09-12-2016, 10:10 AM   #23
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"How do the folks who retrieve from the helm wash down the chain and anchor as it comes up?"

The chain is just long enough to wrap on the gypsy with out going below.

The deck stopper catches the chain and anchor with no load on the windlass.

Since no mud is carried below , no washing is required.

Plan B is a hired deck ape.
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Old 09-12-2016, 10:39 AM   #24
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1) Many folks will tell you that a swivel is the weakest link in a ground tackle system. I tend to agree and that's why I don't have one.


2) Putting hands or fingers anywhere near an operating windlass is likely to result in damage or loss of those hands and fingers. Think of a windlass as a power tool without any safety features.


To answer the original question, I have a windlass to deploy and retrieve my anchor. I've only done it by hand when the windlass failed. I replaced the windlass ASAP.
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Old 09-12-2016, 11:44 AM   #25
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Hmmm...

I use the windlass all the way up. Our anchor weighs 80 pounds, so there is no lifting it by hand.

If it's backwards when it comes up (sometimes the case) I use a boat hook to spin it around.

And yes, we have an all chain rode(plenty long enough), and a proper anchor (a SARCA Excel), and a proper windlass. No we do not have a swivel.
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Old 09-12-2016, 12:45 PM   #26
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In my system, the swivel is the strongest link and using multiple shackles and the type of swivel, it cannot be strained in any way but tension, it's strongest engineering loading requirement.

As in any system...it depends on the chosen components to determine the weakest link.

Given flexibility...it is easy to figure out.

Plus anyone that thinks a windlass is an automatic finger grabber....given how slow most are...needs more time with chainsaws.....
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Old 09-12-2016, 01:22 PM   #27
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Perhaps the best way to attach a swivel is to put a short length of chain between it and the anchor. Just 3-4 links will do.

Eliminating the possibility of the swivel binding on the anchor shank.
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Old 09-12-2016, 01:34 PM   #28
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Perhaps the best way to attach a swivel is to put a short length of chain between it and the anchor. Just 3-4 links will do.

Eliminating the possibility of the swivel binding on the anchor shank.
Mine works great with just one shackle between the anchor and the swivel. It also allows me to use the oversized swivel to overcome a weak link theory.

I have twisted it a 100 different ways...can't get it to foul and put cockeyed strain on the swivel.

But that is my anchor, shackle, swivel and chain combo...may not be the same for anyone else with even one different component.
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Old 09-12-2016, 02:33 PM   #29
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How do the folks who retrieve from the helm wash down the chain and anchor as it comes up? If I retrieved form the helm I would be placing a ton of crap in the chain locker. Some 'splainin please.
My windlass is visible from the helm during operation. If I see muddy water being flung on the SS plate on the pulpit, I'll stop the retrieve from the helm and go to the bow where the washdown hose is mounted in a recessed canister. Then I use the wireless remote to retrieve as I spray with the other hand. I have considered mounting a spray nozzle aimed at the rode as it comes up, but haven't had enough of an issue to pursue this idea in earnest.

Often, maybe 60% of the time, my rode and anchor comes up clean so I just let her run into the locker as is. Usually an overnight hookset will require some cleaning upon retrieval, but many of my anchorings are in fishing holes and may only last a couple of hours. The retrieval process shakes most of the water off the rode. It helps that much of my anchoring is in brackish or fresh water.

My anchor locker has no drain, no mud and no smell.
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Old 09-12-2016, 02:43 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt.Bill11 View Post
Perhaps the best way to attach a swivel is to put a short length of chain between it and the anchor. Just 3-4 links will do.

Eliminating the possibility of the swivel binding on the anchor shank.

That's the way I set mine up too.
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Old 09-12-2016, 04:06 PM   #31
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.......... Plus anyone that thinks a windlass is an automatic finger grabber....given how slow most are...needs more time with chainsaws.....
If you are suggesting that people not think safety when using a boat windlass, that's some pretty irresponsible advice. Used carelessly, it can easily amputate a finger.
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Old 09-13-2016, 06:32 AM   #32
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With some modification usually required to create a genuine chain locker , (which has dimensions , not just dumped onto a surface) it could be easy to have the locker self draining .

Then the chain could be washed by flushing the anchor locker , no mud stink, little effort.
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Old 09-13-2016, 06:50 AM   #33
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Quote:
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If you are suggesting that people not think safety when using a boat windlass, that's some pretty irresponsible advice. Used carelessly, it can easily amputate a finger.
Wes, I think he was alluding to the fact, that if we think windlasses are dangerous to fingers, be extra aware of chainsaws, as they are far worse. At least that was my take on it.
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Old 09-13-2016, 08:12 AM   #34
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I have a faucet in a locker on the fore deck. My anchor locker actually drains through a dedicated through hull.
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Old 09-13-2016, 08:35 AM   #35
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I hope I'm not hijacking the thread by asking this (or showing my ignorance), but this is the 2nd time this subject has come up in as many days. A friend with a new to them boat was on board the other day and asked if we use the windlass to pull the anchor all the way up or do we pull it the last few feet by hand. Seems they had to rebuild their windlass a few times doing that.

Why wouldn't you pull it all the way up with the windlass? I certainly don't over tighten it. I sort of pull it up a foot or do at a time at the end. I don't see how you could do the last few feet by hand. Feeding loose chain onto the gear teeth? Am I misreading something? I always rinse the all-chain rode as it comes up 5-10 feet at a time so chain is not just flying into the windlass/locker.

Should I be doing something different?
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Old 09-13-2016, 08:43 AM   #36
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I hope I'm not hijacking the thread by asking this (or showing my ignorance), but this is the 2nd time this subject has come up in as many days. A friend with a new to them boat was on board the other day and asked if we use the windlass to pull the anchor all the way up or do we pull it the last few feet by hand. Seems they had to rebuild their windlass a few times doing that.

Why wouldn't you pull it all the way up with the windlass? I certainly don't over tighten it. I sort of pull it up a foot or do at a time at the end. I don't see how you could do the last few feet by hand. Feeding loose chain onto the gear teeth? Am I misreading something? I always rinse the all-chain rode as it comes up 5-10 feet at a time so chain is not just flying into the windlass/locker.

Should I be doing something different?
I don't understand how you would do the last few feet by hand either unless the windlass was broken and you disengaged the chain from the gypsy.

I had to pull the anchor up by hand a few times when my windlass failed but I reached out in front of the roller, pulled the chain up by hand and laid it on the deck (the first time). I removed the broken windlass which made it easier to pull the anchor up by hand and feed it into the locker until I was able to replace the windlass.
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Old 09-13-2016, 08:47 AM   #37
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Why wouldn't you pull it all the way up with the windlass? I certainly don't over tighten it. I sort of pull it up a foot or do at a time at the end. I don't see how you could do the last few feet by hand. Feeding loose chain onto the gear teeth? Am I misreading something? I always rinse the all-chain rode as it comes up 5-10 feet at a time so chain is not just flying into the windlass/locker.

Should I be doing something different?
No. Of course pull it all the way up with the windlass. Just take care those last few feet to not slam it home, and that it has come up and over ok, and right way round. What kills the windlass is trying to rip a stuck anchor out of the bottom with the windlass power only, instead of snubbing off and using the boat wave lift, or forward motion to break it free, or backing down too hard on it to set the anchor.
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Old 09-13-2016, 08:52 AM   #38
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I hope I'm not hijacking the thread by asking this (or showing my ignorance), but this is the 2nd time this subject has come up in as many days. A friend with a new to them boat was on board the other day and asked if we use the windlass to pull the anchor all the way up or do we pull it the last few feet by hand. Seems they had to rebuild their windlass a few times doing that.

Why wouldn't you pull it all the way up with the windlass? I certainly don't over tighten it. I sort of pull it up a foot or do at a time at the end. I don't see how you could do the last few feet by hand. Feeding loose chain onto the gear teeth? Am I misreading something? I always rinse the all-chain rode as it comes up 5-10 feet at a time so chain is not just flying into the windlass/locker.

Should I be doing something different?

May depend on what your friend wasn't saying. If he meant they routinely pull the boat all the way up to the anchor, or that they only use the windlass to break the anchor out of a solid set, then that could explain having to rebuild the windlass a few times.

Otherwise, I can't think of much reason to not lift the anchor all the way onboard with the windlass... unless there's something about the set-up (combination of pulpit design/size, anchor design/size/weight, windlass power/location and final rode vector) that would suggest doing otherwise.

In our case, all that stuff conspires against us so I have to bring our anchor up the last few feet manually... but it's not about the windlass itself. Wouldn't hurt the windlass to do those last three feet or so, but it'd slam the flukes into the underside of the pulpit as the shank breaks over the roller if I did it that way. I haven't go a slow-enough speed to do that last bit with the windlass, and haven't ever found a useful clutch adjustment to enable that. And then our anchor sometimes (often) doesn't present itself correct-side-up, anyway, so I have to be up there...

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Old 09-13-2016, 09:04 AM   #39
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Two points from me.

The first is around bringing it up 5-10 feet at a time. Check your windlass manual (on-line if you don't have one at hand). some motors fair better when used continuously rather than stopping and starting like that. Many davit motors for example.

Secondly, regarding "slamming it home." The admiral is the one who carries out anchor duties. One of the first times we anchored out (maybe even THE first time) she slammed the anchor home, right up to the anchor shackle. Then put on the pawl.

The next time we went to anchor the shackle was so far up against the deck hardware that she could not release the chain the inch or so it takes to get the pawl off. I had to quickly run up there and get it sorted. It was a nice on-the-job lesson though and now she makes sure that when the anchor shank is about to hit the roller she is careful to bring it in up to a link or two from the deck hardware.
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Old 09-13-2016, 09:06 AM   #40
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Many windlasses have a manual overide. I have used mine on occasion just to practice, but have heard that some people do it because it is more controlled than some windlasses that retrieve pretty quick.

The other reason is how the anchor nestles on the bow, the windlass can really slap it in there and some may think that's bad.

If the friends had to rebuild their windlass just from raising it out of the water and into the roller, the something else is going on..one possibility is how they use it in general and just THINK the last few feet was doing the damage. Or the windlass is wayyyyy undersized....or.....well lots of possibilities but most people I know don't bring it in the last few feet manually.
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