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Old 07-29-2017, 09:34 AM   #1
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Respect the water.

This happen yesterday late afternoon.


That morning they issued a small craft warning. However, this nitwit decide to take his children sailing.


He has no clue what respect the water means!


Some people are as dumb as a box of rocks!


http://fox8.com/2017/07/28/live-video-five-people-rescued-during-rough-water-on-lake-erie/


Cheers.
H
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Old 07-29-2017, 11:31 AM   #2
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The article said this.....

"Waves between 3 and 7 feet are expected, but meteorologists at FOX 8 said some waves could reach 9 feet.*"

Yet like the videos from the Cape Cod incident, the waves were barely the bottom estimate.

I dont know of a long time, experienced boater who hasn't wound up in a situation or two they wished they hadn't. Some luckily just have minor damage, others wind up on the rocks.

The difference doesn't have to be major, it could be a crab pot line at the last second in the wrong place.....

Sure, lots of stupid things donevout there...but can we honestly paint every incident with that broad stroke and limited info?
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Old 07-29-2017, 11:55 AM   #3
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Worst conditions I ever encountered were in Long Island Sound after a blow went through the 2 previous days. I made the mistake (one time only) of listening to and actually believing the NOAA forecast before setting off in a 50ft trawler from Branford for Narragansett. We were about 5 miles out of Branford when the wind built up to about 50kt and soon we were in 10-12ft seas, water coming over the pilot house, but fortunately wind on the nose. Was not safe to turn back, so had to keep going. Finally was able to run into Niantic and catch a breather. No boat damage, just a few minor leaks!! And after the storm, a very gentle evening anchored in the Niantic River.
By comparison, worst conditions encountered in a smaller vessel (23ft Cruisers cuddy cabin) were in the Cape Cod Canal. Similar story in that when we left the pier the water was calm. But as we approached the canal entrance to Buzzards Bay it got worse and worse. Again it seemed the prudent thing was to keep heading out rather than try to turn about. Finally a few miles out the sea state improved. But it was pretty hairy for those few miles. Needless to say on both occasions, all aboard were wearing life vests, and there were no children involved.
Things do change pretty fast out there!!
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Old 07-29-2017, 12:11 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Chrisjs View Post
Worst conditions I ever encountered were in Long Island Sound after a blow went through the 2 previous days.
Probably most dangerous I ever encountered was a July 4 on Lake Norman. They cancelled the scheduled sailing regatta because too rough to sail. Still some boats had gone in that direction and were attempting to return home. The winds were around 40 knots, gusting much higher. The lake was probably about 4' and as to period, I didn't know anything about period at that point in my life but whatever it was it was extremely short, perhaps 2 seconds but no more than 3. And this was a lake of small boats. I saw to hobie cats flipped that day. One had three people on board and they were able to right it. The other had one person and he was trying to the point of total exhaustion. He'd get on one side, pull and as it pulled up the wind would catch and take it on over the other way. As i was about to approach, a game warden did and got a line and held it for him as he righted it, then followed him to shore. I saw people who looked horrified as they returned home in a small fishing boat, no life jackets worn, and kept an eye on them until they were to safety. The game wardens said the next day that they had 5 total boats to flip or sink and no serious injuries. Once we observed the boat we were watching get to safety, we headed home. The day before had been a nice summer day like any other.

I've been in 15' seas and many other challenging conditions, but the danger of that day was the lack of experience and expectation.
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Old 07-29-2017, 12:49 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
The article said this.....

"Waves between 3 and 7 feet are expected, but meteorologists at FOX 8 said some waves could reach 9 feet.*"

Yet like the videos from the Cape Cod incident, the waves were barely the bottom estimate.

I dont know of a long time, experienced boater who hasn't wound up in a situation or two they wished they hadn't. Some luckily just have minor damage, others wind up on the rocks.

The difference doesn't have to be major, it could be a crab pot line at the last second in the wrong place.....

Sure, lots of stupid things donevout there...but can we honestly paint every incident with that broad stroke and limited info?
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In this case I can paint this Nitwit with a broad brush.

The forecast called for 15 to 20 mph winds out of the Northeast and gust up to 30 to 40 mph. With the winds coming out of the Northeast they are going against the flow of the Lake. (Flows west to east.) When this happens on the Lake, normal waves will run anywhere between 3 to 10 feet. The higher waves are what we call sister waves, which means 3 waves coming from 3 different directions than come together making one big wave.

Lake Eire is shallow so the waves get mighty big really fast and you do not even see them coming. I’ve seen these waves as high as 30 feet in 20 mph winds coming out of the Northeast or East.

The Lake was rough all day long starting about 6am and did ease up until and 1:30am this morning. I was thinking about going to Kelly’s Island yesterday.


When this Nitwit decides to go sailing with his children with waves crashing over the breakwalls and in rough water around 4:00pm or so in a small sailboat with no motor on it, I would call him a Nitwit!


Anyone who cruises the Lake knows do not go out on the Lake when the winds are coming from the Northeast or East.


Even the Fella in the video stated: “We were surprised he even when out!” Why do you think he said that? Because everyone was staying in the marina!


Cheers.
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