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Old 10-10-2015, 12:17 PM   #21
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" Since the price of the boat is so low, it might be worth the cost, to tear out some of the cabinets to see the hull condition. There are long flexible cameras that would allow one to see into tight and dark spaces. The hull plating can be surveyed to check for thickness. Sounds like the boat might be a good buy."

No need to tear out anything. An experienced audioguager can not only tell the thickness of the steel from the outside, but can also tell the thickness of the interior paint coating from outside readings.
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Old 10-10-2015, 12:24 PM   #22
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...
Steel coating technology and proper preparation has been a well known science for a long time, so says Feadship and DuPont.
T. Colvin's books from 1986 discuss proper hull preparation and G. C. Klingel does the same in 1973. Klingel mention's vinyl paints being introduced in 1947 and he used them for over 20 years with success.

It really is a question of was the boat built correctly.

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Old 10-10-2015, 01:13 PM   #23
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The steel Coot can be hoisted by her "ears" and not with slings. Dare you to do that with a plastic boat.



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Old 10-10-2015, 03:29 PM   #24
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The steel Coot can be hoisted by her "ears" and not with slings. Dare you to do that with a plastic boat.
Maybe when new. On a routine peek at the engine the other day I noticed one of the lifting eyes had broken off. Must have sustained some sort of 'ding' in the past which caused a hairline crack that migrated over time. Wouldn't want to see how far the 'ol Coot can bounce!!
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Old 10-10-2015, 06:49 PM   #25
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I had a steel boat. Loved it. And now I have a ferro-cement boat that I also love. But if I were looking for a next vessel, I'd start with fiberglass.


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Old 10-10-2015, 08:06 PM   #26
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My steel hulled boat turned 52 years old this year. All boats require maintenance and proper care. There are distinct advantages and disadvantages to any construction material. Find a material you are comfortable with maintaining and confident in operating and it will go easier on you. If I was in a boat collision derby, I would pick the steel but then I am comfortable with a welding machine as necessary.
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Old 06-01-2016, 06:52 AM   #27
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"Since the price of the boat is so low, it might be worth the cost, to tear out some of the cabinets to see the hull condition."

A properly made steel boat will have the interior assembled so it can be easily removed for the required painting.

If you have to smash the woodwork to get to the hull, the builder had no concept of how to build a steel hulled boat. BEWARE!!
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Old 06-02-2016, 09:05 PM   #28
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"Since the price of the boat is so low, it might be worth the cost, to tear out some of the cabinets to see the hull condition."

A properly made steel boat will have the interior assembled so it can be easily removed for the required painting.

If you have to smash the woodwork to get to the hull, the builder had no concept of how to build a steel hulled boat. BEWARE!!
That would be my thought. If I couldn't at least craw around and look at all the interior, I would be worried. I am not sure what maintenance would be needed. My simple mind would think regular inspection and wire brush and paint where needed?
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Old 06-02-2016, 10:50 PM   #29
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I have a confession I have a massive reluctance to purchase a steel trawler
I don't know why I cant bring myself to purchase steel even when I can get a beautiful big volume trawler that is younger than most fiberglass trawlers for less than 1/2 the price.

Is there a cure will I get over it ? is that little inner voice preventing me from making a big mistake ?
Yes, there's a cure. Stop analyzing it. If you have a reluctance to purchase a steel trawler then don't purchase one and don't try to talk yourself into one. If you were to succeed in doing so, you might very well regret it.
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Old 06-02-2016, 10:50 PM   #30
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The color of orange bleaching out on white paint doesn't mean she's rusting away. 1/4" 5/16" 3/8" steel plate take decades to degrade. Steel can delaminate as well and how fast is determined by recipe just like resin. It's the most common material in the world for construction of just about everything. There is no way I would not consider a steal boat. If you want to get a boat at a fraction of the cost of a plastic one... then sale it for a loss later so what. Who doesn't sale their boat for a loss later. You were looking for economical cruising boat you saved a crap load enough to chase stains for a long time. there's no where you can't find someone to work on it. I've never heard of people making money on wood plastic steel except the brokers after selling. It's not they are inferior it's mostly ignorance (not stupidity) that propagates the fears. One is lack of knowledge other lack of I.Q. If I found a boat passed a survey one that was specifically for a steel boat, which I have done. It passes no problem I would have no problem with buying. All the money you save do the math is equal to what you loose when selling it's a wash. Don't be scared of them find the right expertise to get a good one.
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Old 06-03-2016, 06:47 AM   #31
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My simple mind would think regular inspection and wire brush and paint where needed?
The wire brush or the chipping hammer or needle gun is for repairs to the paint.

Hull protection , inside and out require sandblasting to "water white" as the first step .
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Old 06-03-2016, 06:14 PM   #32
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I wouldn't hesitate to buy a steel boat if it was the right one, and if a bevy of experts gave it the thumbs up. Here's one I wouldn't bother to even look at;

2001 Seahorse Diesel Duck Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com
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Old 06-03-2016, 07:17 PM   #33
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I wouldn't hesitate to buy a steel boat if it was the right one, and if a bevy of experts gave it the thumbs up. Here's one I wouldn't bother to even look at;

2001 Seahorse Diesel Duck Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

Nice staging on the pictures. Lol.

The broker sent me some hull pics on this boat. It's seriously rusted up. Terrible.
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Old 06-03-2016, 07:22 PM   #34
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Nice staging on the pictures. Lol.

The broker sent me some hull pics on this boat. It's seriously rusted up. Terrible.
A wee bit of water damage inside as well...hard to believe it's only 15 years old
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Old 06-03-2016, 07:38 PM   #35
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Nice staging on the pictures. Lol.

The broker sent me some hull pics on this boat. It's seriously rusted up. Terrible.


The rubbish in the washing machine alone tell me to run away from a boat like that .How do people live in conditions like that . Imagine what one would find on a close inspection

And yes 15 years old steel hull that's the sort of thing that confirms my doubts
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Old 06-03-2016, 07:42 PM   #36
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The rubbish in the washing machine alone tell me to run away from a boat like that .How do people live in conditions like that . Imagine what one would find on a close inspection

And yes 15 years old steel hull that's the sort of think that confirms my doubts
By the condition of the prop and zincs, me-thinks there was more than mere neglect going on...
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Old 06-03-2016, 11:30 PM   #37
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From my perspective there is certainly some bedding to be done on the pilot house windows, the overhead in the galley/salon is getting wet from some where. The coating has not been maintained properly, if at all. The engine room hatch has some interesting blistering on the lower left hand side, and some the interior decks look as though they may have been wet at some point. Top side has an interesting crack on the port aft side of the pilot house which may correlate with the crack/scratch on the port (edit Stbd) side of the steps inside forward of the fridge.

So, perhaps grounded hard? Took some water limited to accommodations by the water tight engine room?

MurryM,
Just for my edification, what do you think may be the cause of the damage to the zincs and props?

Cardude01,
Where was the hull rust and how extensive was it? 3/8 in plate is not particularly expensive these days.

Might be saveable by a hearty sole. Probably been worse revived.....
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Old 06-04-2016, 07:33 PM   #38
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Just a guess (regarding the zincs) but it looked to my untrained eye that the boat was either in a marina with a stray electrical current problem, or the zincs hadn't been changed for a long time.

Could also be that it was owner built in the backyard for a decade or more, giving it substantially more time to develop interior water damage and/or rusting issues than the 2001 splash date suggests.
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Old 06-04-2016, 11:16 PM   #39
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Just a guess (regarding the zincs) but it looked to my untrained eye that the boat was either in a marina with a stray electrical current problem, or the zincs hadn't been changed for a long time.

Could also be that it was owner built in the backyard for a decade or more, giving it substantially more time to develop interior water damage and/or rusting issues than the 2001 splash date suggests.

I thought this was a Seahorse build. Maybe I'm mistaken.
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Old 06-05-2016, 07:10 AM   #40
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"It's seriously rusted up. Terrible."

Sand is cheap, paint is cheap, Labor is cheap in many countries.

Plan "B" build a new hull , move everything that is worth saving.

Costs no more to build a steel hull that can be refinished inside and out .
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