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Old 07-17-2015, 10:22 AM   #21
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Welcome to the forum! Hope the survey goes well!

Would just buy a couple sets of earplugs to get the boat home. The refrigerator draws very modest power compared to many other 110ac items such as an air conditioner. The lower the load, the quieter the Honda runs. Very surprised the boat doesn't have an inverter to run the refrigerator off the engine batteries or a house bank when the boat is moving.

Ted
This I think is your best option for now.
A mistake I made was changing things before I really j understood my priorities.

Clearly the inverter will be needed, but you do need to determine battery bank size etc.
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Old 07-17-2015, 12:50 PM   #22
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Just installed a Nova Kool RFU9000 in Old Shiny and so far it looks great. Succumbed to the stainless look to complement the brushed stove and sink, so off to the store to get some stainless cleaner. It's quiet, large, not perfect. I realized that there is a large seam along the bottom that should have been on the top...I will caulk it lest it become grunged with food detritus. The trim and door mechanism is better than the Norcold I deep-sixed and it's very quiet, making as much as a PC might with its fan, which is all you can hear. No compressor noise at all. The crispers are cheesy, Chinese-crappy and will likely be tossed out as soon as I can find something better. It came with ice trays, a concept foreign to me as a Norcold alumnus. It is also supposed to use about 1/3rd of the power the old one did. I haven't clamped it yet to check.

All things considered, including price, it seems like a good score and should improve boating.
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Old 07-17-2015, 01:01 PM   #23
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As to keeping the essentials chilled on your homeward trip, how about a couple of zero-volt, analog ice chests? Depending on the length of your trip and crew size, it should be possible to travel in civilized comfort, stopping every few days to re-ice.
As a supplemental box for frequently accessed drinks etc. that's what I did..Fits nicely in the cockpit and doubles as a cocktail table..Once iced down it'll go 5 day+ keeping drinks frosty cold. MUCH cheaper than a Yeti, nicer hardware, latches, handles etc, with equivalent performance..



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Old 07-17-2015, 05:11 PM   #24
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I've sailed from San Francisco to Los Angeles to Hawaii, Vanuatu and eventually Australia without refrigeration.. How far from home is the boat you're buying?
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Old 07-17-2015, 06:06 PM   #25
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If you use one of them analog icechests (analog LOL), go buy some blocks of dry ice (dont unwrap them from their paper wrappers) and put them in the bottom then what ever youwant to keep cold and some regular ice. The stuff will keep for a week easy.

Anyone seen the yeti beer coozie? $40 for a coozie. boy did they see the boating world coming. LOL
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Old 07-17-2015, 09:18 PM   #26
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How far is this delivery? The ice chest you likely have in the garage should handle at least two weeks with occasional stops for ice. If you don't have one in your garage check your neighbors as I'm sure one of them has one you can borrow.
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Old 07-22-2015, 06:41 AM   #27
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I brought my boat back home from Florida to La. (400 mile trip) without a working refrigerator. Just used 3 Ice chest. Drinks in one. Food in one. and the last one was full of ice. Kept in shade and topped of the food and drinks with ice from 3rd box. If you can keep from opening the boxes often, ice will keep a long time. These where the regular igloo coolers.
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Old 07-23-2015, 01:25 PM   #28
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I'll cast my vote with the inverter crowd. Living out of a cooler is too much like camping.

You can pick up a cheap (disposable) 1000W inverter for under $150, figure another $75-100 for the cables, fuse and terminal ends. Connect it to your existing house bank and keep charging that bank while underway. Like others have said, turn it off at night if you need to conserve the battery charge.

But adding an inverter is the start of something big. It's like the story "If you give a mouse a cookie."

An inverter needs a large battery bank. Upgraded battery banks often need new cables and switches. The bank needs adequate charging and monitoring, so expect to need a large alternator and shore charger. Adding the state of charge (SOC) monitor is essential for healthy batts. Don't want to run the generator too long to charge the batts? You can always add solar or wind charging.

When it's all said and done and paid for, you'll enjoy hanging on the hook for several days in near silence (unless you installed a wind generator!).

Best of luck with the survey, purchase and journey home.
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Old 07-23-2015, 06:40 PM   #29
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I'll cast my vote with the inverter crowd. Living out of a cooler is too much like camping.


For the delivery trip home?















Really?
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Old 07-23-2015, 07:50 PM   #30
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For the delivery trip home?















Really?

LOL! No! Just an inverter to get home. The rest will have to wait until he recovers from the trip.
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Old 07-23-2015, 08:46 PM   #31
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You guys are forgetting the lowly styrofoam coolers that you see as you walk out of a Walmart. I had one that lasted 3 years carrying food to the boat and the mountains. I formed a bond with that cooler. When the corner cracked, I put tape on it. It finally split all the way down, and I had to chuck it. It was a sad day. Liberty Mutual didn't even call.
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Old 07-24-2015, 07:06 AM   #32
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For the adventurous folks , this was lifted from another board,

Free deck fridge that requires no electricity
All sailors should be aware that you can make a free off grid fridge that works well with no electricity. I'm sure anyone could make this for free if they desired.

The science behind these fridges has been cooling food and drinks for over 3000 years, and they are ideal for sailors because the wind, water, and sand required to operate it are easily at hand.

All you need is a couple of plastic bags, some sand, and some water.

It is called a "Zeer Pot Fridge", and I've linked several Youtube videos describing them below. You could build one in 10 minutes and cool your food by 40° (rough) without electrical power.

Typically it is built using pots instead of bags, but I wanted to emphasize the simplicity. I could make one with a few empty boxes and some sand.

If you want a secondary fridge on deck for your beer then a Zeer Pot maybe your answer. They would work great in wind on deck, but not so much in a cabin or galley.

Yet the cost is free for the electricity, and is free to build depending on what you want.. This is assuming you scrounged the necessary bags or boxes, but I'd advise a small investment.

There is probably a hundred Youtube videos on how to construct a Zeer Pot, but this is how Ice was kept frozen back in ancient Rome/Egypt/Mesopotamia. (kinda).

PLEASE SHARE THIS INFO SO OTHERS DO NOT NEED TO FUSS WITH ICEBOXES AS MUCH.

Okay... This is in Boat Design Section. This is because a) I see no refrigerator/galley section to the forum & b) an enterprising designer could build one or more into their ship once they understand the simple mechanics.

They normally require wind for evaporation, and water must be added from time to time. Oddly enough a lot of sailors have an unlimited supply of wind, water, and sand.

This is how the ancient Romans/Egyptians would refrigerate on their ships. It is simply a forgotten technology that keeps getting reinvented (long story).

I will link to a video on youtube, but find your own.. there are many.



This pot seems to use dirt instead of sand... Anything similar would work. Charcoal, sponge, etc. A person could put a few tiny flowers in the dirt section possibly. I wonder if that would aid evaporation? I mean the plant would suck away some of the water.

It works the same way your body cools itself. These clay pots are porous so help the liquids evaporate.


and also



Even rich sailors might wish for a secondary deck fridge. Not exactly an Isotherm or your preference, but it's perfect for sailors and can cost less than a dollar if you want to be frugal.

NOTE: Fresh water evaporates quicker than salt water and is more effective, but ocean water would work in a pinch, but your beer would be a tad warmer. ALSO.. A round zeer pot fridge will cause the wind to circulate around the fridge easier, and this would also aid in the evaporation process that is required.

There are misconceptions about Zeer Fridges so make sure you understand the mechanics fully before building one. i.e. They won't work in your kitchen because they need wind/sun for evaporation. Some have also tried using other liquids such as alcohol which does evaporate quicker, but is more costly and loses some heat transfer values. Water is best. Porous containers (especially outer) is also advantageous. Bags would work in a pinch, but not advised for best results.

Clay pots are porous and allow evaporation. You may notice that the "Sudan Video" (first link) had the fridge suspended in the air. This allows water to evaporate through the bottom of these pots also. The interior pot is also clay and allows water to evaporate from the exposed fridge interior. If you could keep the interior walls clear a tad it would also aid them, but not necessary.

I've heard of people using screening to hold the outer sand. That certainly would be more porous and keep things cooler, but I've not tried that one yet.


This evaporation process is just a simplified process of what occurs in your fridge at home. Evaporated water takes a lot of heat with it.

If you are moved by this information.. please spread the word...

p.s. unrefrigerated eggs last up to 4 times as long if you coat them lightly with vaseline. An old time sailing trick. Eggs have pores that let in air and water. This is why Hard Boiled eggs weigh more.

Save some bilge-sucking scallywag from scurvy.
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Old 07-24-2015, 09:07 AM   #33
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I've noticed there is not much talk of eutectic refrigeration. I had a eutectic freezer in a game fishing boat I owned at one stage driven from a belt driven compressor on one of the engines. It was very efficient and after the initial couple of hours running to cool it down only needed about an hour a day running to keep it frozen. Are they not used much any more?
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Old 07-26-2015, 07:19 AM   #34
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Eutetic is as wonderful and efficient as always.

The hassle is it mist be installed (lots of parts) very well to operate.

Simply throwing a house style box in place is easier for the boat assembler.

As batteries get better (someday we hope) and DC sealed cans grow in size , perhaps there will be a return for Eutetic.

On our 90/90 we run 2 hours and have frozen (+5F) food and a good sized fridge (34F) for 4 days between running.

The price is a huge volume of boat reduced to a modest reefer system.

6 inches of freon blown insulation on top 4 on the sides . plus 22x22 3 inch thick eutetic plates in the reefer reduces the volume a great deal.

Fine on a custom build where its planned for , difficult in a production boat.

For most production boats the option of an interior that could accept a 12v DC Sunfrost unit would be a big help for the non dockside.
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Old 07-26-2015, 12:26 PM   #35
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We keep it pretty simple...

Using inexpensive apartment sized AC Refrigerator in galley area:

When arriving at boat to load-up for couple to several days out and about - utilizing dock AC, we turn frige dial to # 7 (its coldest) and put in pre-cold food from big cooler. Ice from home freezer is then placed into a container and put inside small freezer that is on top in the boat refrigerator.

We open frige door seldom and close quickly. Our gen set usually runs .75 to 1.5 hours in morning and evening for charging batts, cooling frige, charging computer/phone, coffee/cooking... etc. Even in hottest times we usually only need to refresh the ice container inside frige once in two days. Although we do not keep frozen food and keep most drinks in small cooler that is iced we spend fairly little $$$ to consistantly keep cold food/drink aboard.

Happy Food-Cool Daze! - Art


PS: We keep a tall Igloo cooler, in the shade and wrapped in thermal blanket, for replenishment ice only.
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Old 07-26-2015, 12:48 PM   #36
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"USCG forbids their use in boats."

CHARTER BOATS,, not recreational vessels.

The GC has less control over the dangerous activities of pleasure boaters
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Old 07-26-2015, 09:05 PM   #37
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A 150 qt Igloo is about $60 at Costco or Sams. Line the bottom with 8# block ice and go. That will last at least 5 days. Refill when stopped in a marina or dinghy in. Once you get home you can set up a permanent solution. We have a very expensive Frigid Rigid power cooler on board and we still use ice blocks. Running the gen for an hour in the morning and night keeps the blocks whole for weeks. Frozen food sitting on the ice blocks stays frozen and the stuff on top stays 35-40F.
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Old 07-27-2015, 12:22 AM   #38
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Years ago it was common here for cars to carry a canvas water bag hanging from the front bumper bar(they were made of chromed steel then, not painted plastic). There was a cap on top of the bag for water in and out. In an hour or so of driving the water was so cold you got an "ice cream headache" drinking it. Tasted odd, but very cold.
Can`t see why it wouldn`t work on a boat (except for glacial trawler speeds with no breeze), I still like my eutectics and Danfoss powered 12v fridges.
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Old 07-27-2015, 03:21 AM   #39
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Years ago it was common here for cars to carry a canvas water bag hanging from the front bumper bar(they were made of chromed steel then, not painted plastic). There was a cap on top of the bag for water in and out. In an hour or so of driving the water was so cold you got an "ice cream headache" drinking it. Tasted odd, but very cold.
Can`t see why it wouldn`t work on a boat (except for glacial trawler speeds with no breeze), I still like my eutectics and Danfoss powered 12v fridges.
I remember the old canvas water bags. We used to hang them on the bull bars of our trucks and cars and they were very effective. On the cattle stations we had meat safes that worked the same way with a canvas covering that you use to pour water over. They are very effective in drier environments because the evaporation is the source of cooling. I don't know how they would go in a marine environment with high humidity.
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Old 11-01-2016, 04:34 PM   #40
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Older thread... but I was searching "Propane Refrigeration" and this thread came up. When we bought our 1981 38ft Cheer Men Europa sedan, she came equipped with a Norcold ~7cuft RV fridge [115ac/12dc & LPG]. 1993 vintage & still works.
Now, if anyone had ever asked me about a propane fridge on a boat I probably would have told them its a bad idea and when we first took ownership of SAN-BAR a new DC fridge was on the top of the list.
However, once we cleaned the flu-stack to get out the spiders and dust bunnies [boat had been in storage for 18 months] and replaced a smelly hose at the tank, it has worked brilliantly. Yes they produce a lot of heat, but the prior owner had sealed off the vents into the cabin and put large vents top and bottom behind the fridge in the side of the cabin and on a hot day we can run two 'muffin fans' to help the airflow as well. Fuel consumption is very low as noted elsewhere in this thread.
Since it works we'll keep it, but honestly when [if?] it croaks I'm not sure why we would not install another similar unit. We do not have nor want a generator, and the propane vs. compressor aspect allows us to operate modest house battery banks topped up by 100w of solar.

•Marine Surveyor blessed it.
•Insurance company knows it is there.
•Also have a propane oven/stove so we would have tanks anyways.
••What's the down side?
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