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Old 11-06-2014, 04:34 PM   #1
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It rains in Seattle.

And apparently there are some boaters who did not know that.
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Old 11-06-2014, 05:13 PM   #2
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Hard to imagine. After 17 years up there, I am now happy to winter in Florida and the Bahamas.
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Old 11-06-2014, 06:00 PM   #3
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You left out the part about. . . . . rains sideways and the wind blows. Fortunately . . . I don't have to rake the leaves off my lawn now, after today's "unnamed storm," they're half way to Anchorage by now, which is many many miles away from my lawn!!
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Old 11-06-2014, 06:11 PM   #4
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We recently lived in Thorne Bay (SE) where it rains three times as much as Seattle and it rains more than that in Ketchikan.

Most in Thorne Bay use aluminum skiffs w sufficient flotation so they don't sink filled w rainwater. Even w an engine clamped on but most have bilge pumps ... until the battery goes south.
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Old 11-06-2014, 07:43 PM   #5
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If it rains more than five days in a row in NC, I start going batty and gnaw on furniture. Could not handle PNW rain.
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Old 11-06-2014, 08:31 PM   #6
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If it rains more than five days in a row in NC, I start going batty and gnaw on furniture. Could not hand PNW rain.
In Seattle 5 days in a row are common. 15 to 20 starts getting nervy. The only reason I am on the site is rain and gusts in the high 20-30 range.
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Old 11-06-2014, 08:45 PM   #7
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Having grown up in Hawaii, I've had more than my share of unending, tedious, boring sunny weather. The more it rains here (or preferably snows) the better I like it. The only thing I don't care for is wind as it messes up both boating and float flying.

But during the winter, the photo in the original post is not uncommon in our marina. I have yet to see a skiff or dinghy actually sink, but I've seen them come close.

Most power boaters have their shoreboats on board, and the sailboaters tend to put them in the racks provided by the marina if they're not going to be around to keep them bailed out. But there are always a few that stay in the water, and they can become interesting and picturesque aquariums if the owners are absentee.

I think if a skiff or dinghy was actually in danger of disappearing under the surface the Port would pump it out. They patrol the docks at regular intervals during each 24 hour period so a swamped dinghy would get noticed.

Sometimes boaters who frequent the marina year round, as we do, will bail or partially bail out a swamped dinghy that belongs to someone on their dock. We've done it a couple of times.
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Old 11-06-2014, 08:59 PM   #8
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In Seattle 5 days in a row are common. 15 to 20 starts getting nervy. The only reason I am on the site is rain and gusts in the high 20-30 range.
Ed,

Do you keep Moon River in a boat house or a covered slip?
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Old 11-06-2014, 09:18 PM   #9
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Two things keep me from living on the west side of the state anywhere near Seattle.....
The weather
The traffic

We're on the dry side and actually lie in a desert climate. We get 8" of rain a year to offset the 300 days of sunshine a year.

We don't get earthquakes, tornadoes, hurricanes, floods or any of those fun things they get on the other side.

We do get a volcano every now and then, but we had one about 25 years ago so we shouldn't have to worry for another 5 million years or so.
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Old 11-06-2014, 09:40 PM   #10
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Seattle days with rain average 149 per year. The record for the number of consecutive days with rain is 33. Annual rainfall is 38 inches, placing Seattle 44th among major US cities. This last ranking surprises most people that live somewhere else, since they usually only hear about the first two stats.
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Old 11-06-2014, 09:52 PM   #11
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Seattle days with rain average 149 per year. The record for the number of consecutive days with rain is 33. Annual rainfall is 38 inches, placing Seattle 44th among major US cities. This last ranking surprises most people that live somewhere else, since they usually only hear about the first two stats.
Shhhh, don't tell anybody that....

There are already too many condos going up! A bumper sticker I saw last summer said it all - "Ballard welcomes its new Condo overlords"
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Old 11-06-2014, 10:12 PM   #12
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Seattle days with rain average 149 per year. The record for the number of consecutive days with rain is 33. Annual rainfall is 38 inches, placing Seattle 44th among major US cities. This last ranking surprises most people that live somewhere else, since they usually only hear about the first two stats.
Annual rainfall in south FL is over 60 inches per year.
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Old 11-06-2014, 10:13 PM   #13
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Ed,

Do you keep Moon River in a boat house or a covered slip?
Moon River is in a covered slip at the SYC main station in Portage Bay. Tomorrow it goes out for an 11 O' clock tank top off at Morrison's fuel dock. I tend to run it at least every two weeks going into lake Washington to get engines up to temp. and flush the fresh water through the cooling SX. The covered slip keeps sun(what sun)and water off but not dirt that blows in or spider droppings.
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Old 11-06-2014, 10:30 PM   #14
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The thing people don't understand about PNW rain, and I didn't until I moved here, is that it seldom rains very hard. Certainly not like SE/Fla thundershowers. It is gernerally a misty type rain. The other thing is that everyone in Seattle just ignores it and goes on doing whatever they were doing. The PNW is an outdoors area, everybody is doing something out of doors. Rainsdoesn't even rise to the level of being annoying for most. Only tourists use umbrellas!
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Old 11-06-2014, 10:39 PM   #15
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Rainsdoesn't even rise to the level of being annoying for most.
You got that right. I can't recall ever cancelling an outside activity, be it fly fishing on a river, boating or fishing in saltwater,trail riding (horses), hunting, skiing (when I used to ski a bit), hiking, etc. because of rain.

Wind, yes. That can shut things down some. But not rain. Rain makes the grass grow and the fish happy.
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Old 11-07-2014, 12:15 AM   #16
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We are lookong forward to being back in the Northwest. The rain doesn't bother me at all. Having done hard time in California now I can say that in my experience more people seem to be outside enjoying themselves in the northwest than they are in sunny California.
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Old 11-07-2014, 12:45 AM   #17
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Moon River is in a covered slip at the SYC main station in Portage Bay. Tomorrow it goes out for an 11 O' clock tank top off at Morrison's fuel dock. I tend to run it at least every two weeks going into lake Washington to get engines up to temp. and flush the fresh water through the cooling SX. The covered slip keeps sun(what sun)and water off but not dirt that blows in or spider droppings.
Regular use is good for the boat and good for the soul. Living near fresh and saltwater is a great advantage. I like to move back and forth and find that what likes to grow in the salt dies in fresh water...and vice versa. Flushing the cooling system is another bonus.

My last covered slip in the Delta was in a 10 boat, 3-wall shed and spiders and muddaubbers were an issue. The weather there was much drier. sunnier and warmer than where I am now in Valejo...kind of the cusp of fresh and saltwater as well as the border between the Delta and SF/San Pablo Bay. Now it's marine layer overcast in the AM, often periods of fog and 10-20 degrees cooler than Sacramento or the Delta. Spiders and wasps are no issue here. Our region is filled with micro climates so if you don't like the weather where you are, a short drive can change it for you.

I love keeping the boat under a cover. I sleep better.
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Old 11-07-2014, 01:47 AM   #18
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All of us in the Central Valley (particularly the farmers) would appreciate you praying that some of the PNW rain would come down here. Last year we got a whopping total of about 4 inches.
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Old 11-07-2014, 01:48 AM   #19
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Clarification: that's the Central Valley of California
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Old 11-07-2014, 02:09 AM   #20
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All of us in the Central Valley (particularly the farmers) would appreciate you praying that some of the PNW rain would come down here.
We've done a fair amount of work in the United Arab Emirates over the years, and they get their fresh water mostly from huge desalinization plants. In fact, their desal plants are so strategic to their wealfare that they are tops on the the official list of things in the UAE you can't point a camera at. Serious penalties if you're caught doing it.

I've sometimes wondered why the US does not make use of this technology. I would think that a few desal plants on the scale of what's used in the UAE set up on SFO bay or in the delta area pumping through pipelines to the central valley would be able to provide a major source of water to the farmers and growers out there.

The little island in the San Juans on which we have property used to rely on a pair of wells for water. Every summer, the water levels would get lower and lower to the point where pretty severe restrictions had to be put on the people who had full or part time residences on the island.

Then in the late 1980s (IIRC), the owners association approved the installation of a small reverse osmosis desalinization system. I believe it was the first one in the San Juans, but I could be wrong. That one little plant provided more water than the island needed and the wells were shut down.

More recently, as the number of people using the island has increased somewhat, a second osmosis system was installed next to the first one. And I understand there are similar systems that have been installed on some of the other islands.

I would think a very much scaled up version of the same idea could be applied to the agriculture industry in California.

We actually don't get all that much rain in the PNW in the overall scheme of things. The rain doesn't really contribute all that much to our water supply, anyway. What does is the snow pack and the glaciers in the Cascades.

Unfortunately the glaciers have been receding at an increasing rate, so both the western side of the state and the agricultural region immediatly east of the Cascades (orchards, mainly) depend heavily on the annual snowpack for their water needs.

Some years the snowpack is very deep. Some years not so much. After a pretty good winter last year, they're saying that this winter will be "not so much." Which does not bode well for either side of the mountains.....
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