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Old 06-05-2015, 03:37 PM   #21
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I just looked at all the pics from your fliker link. Wow! what an incredible build. You should be very proud. You are definitely a more patient than me.
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Old 06-05-2015, 03:53 PM   #22
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if this is the boat you just launched then you probably have a new common rail engine. Filter advice from guys running 40 YO slow diesels doesn't apply. Your engine maker will have very specific advice regarding bio fuel and filtration. These are critical issues on common rail engines.
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Old 06-05-2015, 06:16 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by bayview View Post
if this is the boat you just launched then you probably have a new common rail engine. Filter advice from guys running 40 YO slow diesels doesn't apply. Your engine maker will have very specific advice regarding bio fuel and filtration. These are critical issues on common rail engines.
That's true to a point. But what has changed is the viscosity and make up of Biodiesel. It has random amounts of coagulants in it. It is a blend of vegetable, used cooking oil and diesel. They sometimes do not get the blend just right. The only way to get it to thin out is to keep it heated. A boat that is using biodiesel and keep running (with the return heating up the tank) sees almost no issues. But a boat with a tank full, and just sitting there will be crudded up in no time, and get filled with a 'gelatin' coating. Almost like wax or paraffin. The mentioned 'pre filter' of a centrifuge type filter is most often seen installed to combat this. BUT, the best way to avoid it is to not buy biodiesel.

What the manual says is often trumped with what is seen in the field. I frequently haul biodiesel in 4.2 million gallon lots. More often than not our tanks are a complete mess. The bio additive part is literally hanging off the frames and ladders in the tanks like strands of goo. The stuff is tenacious. It takes several hours of hot water washing to clean the tanks for the next load. Customers have to pay extra for cleaning to get rid of the stuff so it doesn't contaminate the next cargo. This was a huge issue several years ago when it was introduced, since no one knew about these qualities. The operators were left holding the financial bag since there had never been anything like this residue before, to deal with when switching cargoes. Now it is routinely put into the contracts that tanks with bio blends are subject to being professionally cleaned after haulage.
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Old 06-05-2015, 06:28 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bayview View Post
if this is the boat you just launched then you probably have a new common rail engine. Filter advice from guys running 40 YO slow diesels doesn't apply. Your engine maker will have very specific advice regarding bio fuel and filtration. These are critical issues on common rail engines.
+1

I don't know what kind of motor is in the boat. If it is a Cummins, they provide instructions on how to use biodiesel in their motors and how to properly filter the fuel.

Cummins Engines
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Old 06-05-2015, 06:58 PM   #25
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That's true to a point. But what has changed is the viscosity and make up of Biodiesel. It has random amounts of coagulants in it. It is a blend of vegetable, used cooking oil and diesel. They sometimes do not get the blend just right. The only way to get it to thin out is to keep it heated. A boat that is using biodiesel and keep running (with the return heating up the tank) sees almost no issues. But a boat with a tank full, and just sitting there will be crudded up in no time, and get filled with a 'gelatin' coating. Almost like wax or paraffin. The mentioned 'pre filter' of a centrifuge type filter is most often seen installed to combat this. BUT, the best way to avoid it is to not buy biodiesel.

What the manual says is often trumped with what is seen in the field. I frequently haul biodiesel in 4.2 million gallon lots. More often than not our tanks are a complete mess. The bio additive part is literally hanging off the frames and ladders in the tanks like strands of goo. The stuff is tenacious. It takes several hours of hot water washing to clean the tanks for the next load. Customers have to pay extra for cleaning to get rid of the stuff so it doesn't contaminate the next cargo. This was a huge issue several years ago when it was introduced, since no one knew about these qualities. The operators were left holding the financial bag since there had never been anything like this residue before, to deal with when switching cargoes. Now it is routinely put into the contracts that tanks with bio blends are subject to being professionally cleaned after haulage.


It's always nice to get some low inference data for a change.
THANKS.
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Old 06-05-2015, 07:56 PM   #26
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It's always nice to get some low inference data for a change.
THANKS.
The nice thing about low inference data is, the receptor has to be cognizant of how to receive it, and how to use it! (or even if they can understand the data!)
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Old 06-05-2015, 10:48 PM   #27
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The original question was about biodiesel and filters. The manufacturers make filter specs to run their engines. Bio diesel is an 'emerging' product. In the U.S. The specs have been under just about constant review, morphing into different (usually lesser quality) standards. I can only imagine what the QC is like in Brazil. It is just about impossible to state with certainty what anyone should do concerning filters or biodiesel (except to find straight diesel) when the base product has so many different viscosities, ingredients and need for filtering.

Just because someone isn't aware of the differences in fuel quality does not mean it isn't giving people 'fits' around the globe.

A true centrifugal fuel purifier is very labor intensive to clean. Sort of takes away any benefit to using bio fuel as a lure to reduce carbon.
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