Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-07-2013, 08:44 PM   #1
Member
 
City: Santa Fe, NM
Country: USA
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 20
Questions about buying my first boat

Good afternoon. As you can tell, I'm new on this forum. After spending a glorious 10 days in the San Juan Islands on a friend's 58' steel trawler, I've decided that the boating life is for me. I've decided to re-order some priorities and plans, and to buy a trawler - most likely in the 40-50' size class. The lines that interest me - and that are accessible given my budget - include Ocean Alexander, Sea Ranger / C&L, and Island Gypsy. Although the plan is to moor the boat in the PNW, I have not foreclosed the option of buying in California where my aging parents live with the idea of using it as a floating condo/day cruiser while I "polish" it up and learn the ropes. I'd then move the boat up to the PNW after a year or two. I have some basic questions about the purchase process:

First, is it the general practice for purchasers to be represented by their own brokers, or is the seller's broker the only broker involved? Are there such things as "buyer's brokers," and if so what role do they play in the process?

Second, is it kosher for me to ask for copies of any and all recent surveys which are in the possession of the seller, or are such surveys generally not made available to prospective buyers?

I'm sure I'll have many more questions, and I really appreciate the availability of all your accumulated wisdom. Happy to be here!
__________________
Advertisement

Kawini is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 09:14 PM   #2
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
(Kawini-- Sent you a PM)
__________________

Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 09:37 PM   #3
Guru
 
City: Hotel, CA
Country: Fried
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 8,328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kawini View Post
Are there such things as "buyer's brokers," and if so what role do they play in the process?
Yes, they represent you in the purchase of the vessel as your professional advocate in the transaction not unlike your real estate broker.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Kawini View Post
Second, is it kosher for me to ask for copies of any and all recent surveys which are in the possession of the seller, or are such surveys generally not made available to prospective buyers?
Yes, but... They mean very little to almost nothing IMO. The only survey that matters is the one you commission and pay for yourself. There is a night and day difference between an owner provided copy of an "insurance survey" and a full blown "pre-purchase" survey. You hire and pay for the surveyor, the surveyor is working for you and his report of findings is your property.

Good luck in your quest.
__________________
Craig

It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they've been fooled - Mark Twain
CPseudonym is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 10:12 PM   #4
Member
 
City: Santa Fe, NM
Country: USA
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 20
Thanks so much for your prompt reply. If I engage a buyer's broker, is s/he paid a share of the commission which the seller pays during the transaction as in the real estate context?
Kawini is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 10:33 PM   #5
Guru
 
Conrad's Avatar
 
City: Calgary
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Blue Sky
Vessel Model: Nordic Tugs 42 Hull #001
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,553
I wholeheartedly endorse Craig's comments. The buyer's broker does share the commission with the seller's broker; in fact, my buyer's broker this spring commented that most of his sales are actually shared commissions.

The concept of utilizing a buyer's broker is very valid in my view. As a buyer, you do not pay the commission but your broker can maximize your benefits by ensuring that your requirements are a key part of the process.
__________________
Conrad
Berthed in
Campbell River BC
Conrad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 11:25 PM   #6
Guru
 
bligh's Avatar
 
City: Santa Cruz, CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Frisky
Vessel Model: 99 Nordic Tug
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,096
What everyone said is true. But the best survey will be performed by you going through every system on board yourself before purchase.
bligh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2013, 12:40 AM   #7
GFC
Guru
 
GFC's Avatar
 
City: Tri Cities, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Beachcomber
Vessel Model: Sea Ray 550 Sedan Bridge
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,685
Bligh, I'm not sure that's a practical answer for a guy who has not owned a boat and is looking for one that's going to be as complicated as what he's looking at.

Speaking for myself here, I've been a boater for 50+ years and I would never have attempted to try to do what you suggested on my boat. Much of it was entirely new to me (diesel engines, diesel genset, fuel filter systems, hydraulic steering and shifting, etc.) and I was overwhelmed by the complexity of it all.

Kawini, if I were to make a couple of suggestions to you, the most important (IMHO) would be to not be in a hurry. Take your time, visit lots of boat shows and brokerages looking at the types of boats you're interested in. Check out the spaciousness as well as how things are laid out. Look for storage space, how much fuel and water capacity is there, etc.

My second suggestion would be to buy your second boat first. Many people don't spend the time necessary to do proper due diligence and end up with a boat that either doesn't fit their needs or isn't what they thought they were getting into.

If it takes a year or more for you to find the right type of boat, that's great. Then take the time to find the right one for you. Don't let the enthusiasm that came from having a great trip to the San Juans let you rush into buying the wrong boat.
__________________
Mike and Tina
Beachcomber 1995 Sea Ray 550 Sedan Bridge
GFC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2013, 09:16 AM   #8
Member
 
jbuck's Avatar
 
City: Split croatia
Country: France
Vessel Name: Lilja
Vessel Model: Defever 44
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 23
Hello,
Rather than start a new thread with exactly the same question can I add to this one?
I recently visited a defever 44 in the South of France; great looking boat but as an ex sail boat man the engine room scared me. Such a lot of equipment. Where can I learn more about all the equipment, and makes up a trawler, the essential and the optional so I can start asking the right questions. It is a 1986 model and i'd like to know if a part breaks or needs servicing what the potential costs are. Forgive me for butting in.
jbuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2013, 10:48 AM   #9
Member
 
City: Santa Fe, NM
Country: USA
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 20
Bligh - I wish I had the wherewithal to make productive use of your advice, because my gut tells me that you are correct. However, as the subsequent poster surmises I am simply not in the position do make any sort of educated evaluation of a boat's systems. I've had alot of interesting experiences in my life - career and hobbies that I've enjoyed - but boats, electronics, mechanics, plumbing, engines are simply not part of my skill set. At least for now.

I've got to say, my visits to the forum can be a bit intimidating at times. Reading this forum, one gets the idea that all of you guys could take apart AND put back together your diesel engines with your eyes closed and one hand tied behind your back. But, truth be told, that's just not me. I have no doubt in the world that being self-sufficient insofar as systems are concerned is optimal. But is it necessary? In all sincerity, I've thought about disqualifying myself from boat ownership because of my limited mechanical ability. But it's hard to believe that all these people I see enjoying themselves in the San Juan Islands have these skills. I'm certainly interested in developing this knowledge and these skills - and I understand that I'll probably ending up shelling out many $$$ to "professionals" until I develop these skills - but in the meanwhile I have to "take myself as I am."

GFC - Your advice is good and well taken. I have checked myself many times and considered the fact that I'm moving too fast here, but a couple of things come into play: (1) I love being on the water and always have. (2) I have an extreme desire to have a toe hold on the West Coast (born and raised in the SF Bay Area), but simply cannot afford the real estate there. (3) I have lived - and happily - for long periods of time with my partner in extremely close quarters, so that's not a problem. (4) There's more, but you get the drfit.

Nonetheless, your advice about "second boat first" seems compelling In line with this advice, I'm doing some basic due diligence (insofar as I am able) on a smaller (34 foot) boat that I've found in SoCal. The idea is that the entry cost would be far less, the maintenance would be less, and if I realize that I made a mistake in my choice of boat (or in pursuing this interest, more generally) the monetary loss would be less when I sell the boat. But, then I wonder whether having a significantly smaller boat (i.e., smaller than the larger boat with separate pilot house that I lust after) would alter (in an adverse) way my experience.

Also, insofar as timing is concerned, I have this idea that boat prices -- at least in the older models that I'm looking at -- are about as low as they'll go now. Of course, I have to admit that this is idle speculation on my part as I honestly cannot claim any knowledge about this market. What do you think? Do you think that there's a possibility that prices on older (1980-1985) fiberglass trawlers in my preferred size class (honestly mid-40s to 50) will begin to rise? Or, alternatively, are these boats going to become cheaper as time passes? It seems like there are some great deals to be had out there, and I attribute that to the economy and to the fact that some owners simply cannot afford to maintain their boats. Could that change. Will I always be able to find a 45-50 trawler in reasonably good condition for <$100k. Obviously, I'm asking you to look into a crystal ball which is absurd, but you get the idea.

Finally, I do have a pretty good idea of what I want. I have zeroed in on a Europa style boat, galley up is a requirement, separate pilot house is ideal, as much deck space (cockpit and flybridge deck) as possible, 2 cabins OK but preferably 3, walk-around with actually useable side decks, etc. As I said in my original post, it seems that Ocean Alexander, Island Gypsy, and C&L/Sea Ranger have some interesting options that match those specifications at a price point that I can manage.

But then there's always the question of the condition of the boat, and there's the rub! As nice as I am, I just don't have the skills to evaluate boat condition at this point in time.

Thanks all for your comments!
Kawini is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2013, 12:06 PM   #10
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Country: Bumpkin?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 9,995
Greetings,
Mr./Ms. Kawini. Welcome aboard. Don't sell yourself short regarding your "qualifications" (mechanical, electrical etc.) I certainly can't assemble a diesel engine or repair any electronic items, short of changing a fuse BUT, like you, I love the water.
As has been suggested, take your time. Take LOTS of time. Go to boat shows, walk the docks and ask LOTS of questions. Keep a file of boats you "like" and try to visit similar models. DON'T get emotional at all about ANY vessel.
Prices? You're gonna pay what you're gonna pay regardless of the market providing you make an INFORMED and EDUCATED choice.
Regarding condition? That's what surveys are for.
Good hunting.
__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2013, 12:17 PM   #11
Guru
 
bligh's Avatar
 
City: Santa Cruz, CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Frisky
Vessel Model: 99 Nordic Tug
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,096
Everyone here is correct.
Sorry, my last post was made from my telephone and was too short. My point is that a surveyor is not necessarily going to give you all the information you need to make a qualified decision on a purchase. When I say," go through every system", I do not mean take the heads off the diesels, I mean try out the plumbing, the showers, auto pilot , the windlass, the refrigerator, everything that has a switch. Look at the electical panel, especially teh inside of it. Is is neat and organized or is it a rats nest? Google the manufacturer and model of every major appliance/piece of equipment on the vessel (especially the engine!). Familiarize your self with the boat and its equipment. I would do this before hiring a surveyor, so that when the surveyor arrives, I would have a list of questions for him as well. Make sure you or the surveyor inspects the inside of the fuel tanks. A boat survey does not necessarily include an engine survey, so get the engines surveyed as well. Whatever boat you are buying, someone here already probably has one and can tell you the problems you can expect, costs related to fix, and what to look for in regards to pre-purchasing that a surveyor may overlook (and they do overlook things!)

PS. I am in the same 'boat' as you per say in that I am looking for a boat to use in the PNW, but live here in CA
bligh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2013, 12:21 PM   #12
GFC
Guru
 
GFC's Avatar
 
City: Tri Cities, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Beachcomber
Vessel Model: Sea Ray 550 Sedan Bridge
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,685
Kawini, Like I said above, when I bought my boat I was totally overwhelmed. I talked several times with my surveyor and told him that and asked him to take his time and do a very thorough job of evaluating the boat and all its systems. I made sure he knew I was relying on him to keep my dumb butt out of trouble on that boat.

So here I am three plus years later and only now am getting pretty comfy with doing all the stuff that goes along with maintenance of a boat. I still don't do the engine room checks every time and don't check batteries as often as I should, and don't open/close the thru hulls as often as I should, but I'm getting better and I'm getting to know the boat.

I ain't no mekanyik by any stretch of one's imagination but I do as much as I can so I learn the boat's systems. But I like doing it and consider it a labor of love.

As to your question about boat values....boats depreciate down to a point where there isn't much left to depreciate unless the condition deteriorates. A good boat of the type you mentioned won't go up or down much from where it is right now. Yeah, prices have risen over the past ~5 years but I don't expect that to continue too much over the next few years.

There will be a shortage of boat in years 2007-2010 because of manufacturing cutbacks during the great recession, and there will be somewhat of a shortage of used boats due to hurricane damaged boats, but that's mainly an east coast thing.

So throw out your anchor and slow your butt down in your buying 'frenzy'. The boats will still be there when you've taken your time and are capable of making the right decision on the right boat in the right size.

FOOLS RUSH IN!
__________________
Mike and Tina
Beachcomber 1995 Sea Ray 550 Sedan Bridge
GFC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2013, 12:23 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
yachtbrokerguy's Avatar


 
City: Fort Lauderdale, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Model: I have keys to lots of boats...
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 469
I often suggest to a potential buyer to investigate obtaining insurance as one of the first things to do. Many insurers are reluctant to insure a larger boat being purchased by an inexperienced boater.
I also suggest finding some local classes often held by the US Power Squadron or the US Coast Guard Auxiliary. Search on the BoatUS website for local classes. Having completed some of these classes helps in getting insurance and adds a lot to the fun of learning.
__________________
Tucker Fallon CPYB
www.yachtbrokerguy.com
yachtbrokerguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2013, 12:30 PM   #14
Guru
 
skipperdude's Avatar
 
City: Whittier AK
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Apache II
Vessel Model: 1974 Donald Jones
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,147
Kawaini, Don't let the mechanical part of a boat be that great a cause for concern Diesel engines are really not that complicated.
You will be surprised at how fast a skill set will develop.
Diesels don't seem to breakdown that often most problems are with fuel.

The rest of the systems usually break in intervals.
you will get a glitch in an electrical component or the toilet will break down.
my point is you don't have to know everything at once.

When you look at a boat just be sure to turn everything on and know that it works when you buy it.
If things don't work you dicker with the seller on what is to be fixed before during and after the sale.

A good survey is important. Shop around for a good surveyor with a solid reputation.
Even hire a captain with knowledge of the type of boat you have.

If something breaks you can fix or hire it fixed.

The most important things are a sound hull and a good motor everything else is just fluff.

If you are sure you can get home that is all that really matters.

SD
__________________
If you can't repair it maybe it shouldn't be on the boat
skipperdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2013, 01:35 PM   #15
TF Site Team
 
Pau Hana's Avatar


 
City: Seattle, WA
Country: Good Ol' US of A!
Vessel Name: Pau Hana
Vessel Model: 1989 PT52 Overseas Yachtfisher
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 1,647
Quote:
Originally Posted by yachtbrokerguy View Post
I often suggest to a potential buyer to investigate obtaining insurance as one of the first things to do. Many insurers are reluctant to insure a larger boat being purchased by an inexperienced boater.
I also suggest finding some local classes often held by the US Power Squadron or the US Coast Guard Auxiliary. Search on the BoatUS website for local classes. Having completed some of these classes helps in getting insurance and adds a lot to the fun of learning.
Tucker makes a great point- one that is too often overlooked until the last minute.

Insuring a vessel is like baking a cake; combine the ingredients in the right proportion (including heat), and you have a fin dessert. Neglect an ingredient or two, and you have something worthy of the trash heap.

For vessels, the ingredients include:
  • The vessel itself (year, model, length, propulsion type, horsepower, speed potential, construction materials, etc)
  • The waters navigated
  • The owner's experience (or lack thereof)- both ownership of a vessel and operations of vessels
  • For older vessels, the survey report
  • Whether the vessel is a liveaboard or not
  • and more

Miss one, and the desired result is lost.

Underwriters are generally comfortable with a vessel owner jumping in size 8-10'. Some markets are OK with a jump of 15'. If you have limited experience or experience on smaller boats only, all markets will require some type of USCG skippered training on larger vessels before any solo operations are permitted. Some may go as far as require a skipper onboard for the first year- but that's a rare requirement.

Good hunting in your search, and brush up on your duct tape skills; all good trawler owners can fix anything with a pipe wrench, a screwdriver, a buck knife, and duct tape
__________________
Peter- Marine Insurance Guru & tuna fishing addict!

1989 52' PT Overseas yachtfisher
Pau Hana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2013, 04:01 PM   #16
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,707
The first thing I would probably suggest you objectively evaluate is you voiced need for such a big boat.

And most people buy on the basis of what turns them on. Frequently a big mistake.
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2013, 05:13 PM   #17
Guru
 
brian eiland's Avatar
 
City: St Augustine, FL
Country: USA & Thailand
Vessel Name: RunningTide
Vessel Model: 37 Louisiane catamaran
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 890
Dutch Stella Maris

Here is a vessel that's in your price range.
Don't know if this comes anywhere near what you have in mind at the moment, but you might take a look at this QUALITY built Dutch vessel that is owned by a good friend of mine. He spent a good year redoing many things on this already fine example of a vessel in preparation for his two year trip up to Alaska. I posted some pics over here:
Trawler Forum - View Single Post - Hull Shapes----Show us your girl's bottom

If this vessel were already on the east coast I likely might be buying it myself. He is asking what I consider to be a very fair price for a real quality built boat that should hold its value very well considering what it would cost to replace it now, or in the future.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Kawini
Also, insofar as timing is concerned, I have this idea that boat prices -- at least in the older models that I'm looking at -- are about as low as they'll go now. Of course, I have to admit that this is idle speculation on my part as I honestly cannot claim any knowledge about this market. What do you think? Do you think that there's a possibility that prices on older (1980-1985) fiberglass trawlers in my preferred size class (honestly mid-40s to 50) will begin to rise? Or, alternatively, are these boats going to become cheaper as time passes? It seems like there are some great deals to be had out there, and I attribute that to the economy and to the fact that some owners simply cannot afford to maintain their boats. Could that change. Will I always be able to find a 45-50 trawler in reasonably good condition for <$100k. Obviously, I'm asking you to look into a crystal ball which is absurd, but you get the idea.
First off let me say I make no pretense at being very knowledgeable about the trawler market. In fact I am researching it to determine if its worthwhile to even consider introducing another produce.

It appears to me that 'Trawlers' got a big jumpstart back around 15-20 years ago (after another of our big fuel crisis) , and lots of manufacturers jumped in. The boating market was also pretty good at these early times, particularly powerboats. now we have come to a time when many of those owners have decided that owning a vessel is an expense they can no longer afford, particularly the older owner who may have had to lend a helping hand to their siblings after the market crash of 2008. Don't know for sure, but I suspect this may have something to do with some of the pricing on used vessels.

On the other hand there are any number of boat manufacturers that have had to go out of business over these past 5 years, so when a certain demand for certain types of vessels comes back, there are going to be fewer suppliers, and certain building cost have risen dramatically. The price of a new boat will make some of the used ones look even more like a bargain, particularly if you have chosen wisely and kept it in good condition.


Quote:
Finally, I do have a pretty good idea of what I want. I have zeroed in on a Europa style boat, galley up is a requirement, separate pilot house is ideal, as much deck space (cockpit and flybridge deck) as possible, 2 cabins OK but preferably 3, walk-around with actually useable side decks, etc.
I would suggest that you NOT get trapped into the idea of how many staterooms and bathrooms you can cram into a 40-50 vessel. Too many production boat folks let themselves get trapped into this 'marketing idea' as well,...to the detriment of the finished product.
brian eiland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2013, 06:54 PM   #18
Guru
 
bligh's Avatar
 
City: Santa Cruz, CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Frisky
Vessel Model: 99 Nordic Tug
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,096
Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by brian eiland View Post
Here is a vessel that's in your price range.
Don't know if this comes anywhere near what you have in mind at the moment, but you might take a look at this QUALITY built Dutch vessel that is owned by a good friend of mine. He spent a good year redoing many things on this already fine example of a vessel in preparation for his two year trip up to Alaska. I posted some pics over here:
Trawler Forum - View Single Post - Hull Shapes----Show us your girl's bottom
Brian that is a sharp vessel. What do you know about the engine brand/model?
I also noticed what looks like an outside helm, but there are no pictures. Can you tell me if this is is just an outside bridge or does it also have a second helm station?




Quote:
Originally Posted by brian eiland View Post
First off let me say I make no pretense at being very knowledgeable about the trawler market. In fact I am researching it to determine if its worthwhile to even consider introducing another produce.

It appears to me that 'Trawlers' got a big jumpstart back around 15-20 years ago (after another of our big fuel crisis) , and lots of manufacturers jumped in. The boating market was also pretty good at these early times, particularly powerboats. now we have come to a time when many of those owners have decided that owning a vessel is an expense they can no longer afford, particularly the older owner who may have had to lend a helping hand to their siblings after the market crash of 2008. Don't know for sure, but I suspect this may have something to do with some of the pricing on used vessels.

On the other hand there are any number of boat manufacturers that have had to go out of business over these past 5 years, so when a certain demand for certain types of vessels comes back, there are going to be fewer suppliers, and certain building cost have risen dramatically. The price of a new boat will make some of the used ones look even more like a bargain, particularly if you have chosen wisely and kept it in good condition.
Brian , you make some good points.
I am no economist or boat builder and I have no real knowledge of the boat manufacturing industry. But i suspect there are a lot of baby boomers out there that currently have boats that were build in the last 30 years. As this generation gets older, they will begin to sell them off. My parents fall into this category and are 67 years old. At what point do they sell there boat? (they dont have a boat, but lets assume they did for the sake of discussion) Do they sell it when they are 70? 75? 80? Anyhow, when this generation does decide to unload their toys, there will be a lot of used boats on the market. Hopefully that surplus will keep the used boat prices down for a while. On the other hand , a lot of baby boomers may have already sold their boat during the last recession to try and save their retirement.. We will see what happens over the next decade or so


Quote:
Originally Posted by brian eiland View Post
I would suggest that you NOT get trapped into the idea of how many staterooms and bathrooms you can cram into a 40-50 vessel. Too many production boat folks let themselves get trapped into this 'marketing idea' as well,...to the detriment of the finished product.
What sucks for me about my boat search is that most powerboats dont have enough sleeping accommodations for our family (6). I cruised with my dad during my youth on a 24 ft sailboat. It slept 4 people, 2 in the fo'c'sle and 2 at the dinette. It seems like as powerboats get bigger, they just get bigger. I'm sure I know why, but its not easy finding a 40 ft powerboat that sleeps 8. I'm finding that in general, about half the 40ft trawlers will sleep 6 with a converted dinette, but no more.
Often I find myself looking at sailboats that seem to sleep more people as the size goes up- but then I think about all the years I spent standing at the helm getting soaked in my rain gear.
Sorry, I'm not trying to hijack the thread, just venting.
bligh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2013, 01:03 PM   #19
Guru
 
brian eiland's Avatar
 
City: St Augustine, FL
Country: USA & Thailand
Vessel Name: RunningTide
Vessel Model: 37 Louisiane catamaran
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 890
Quote:
Originally Posted by bligh View Post
Brian that is a sharp vessel. What do you know about the engine brand/model?
I also noticed what looks like an outside helm, but there are no pictures. Can you tell me if this is is just an outside bridge or does it also have a second helm station?
I think the DAF engines are pretty well know in Dutch boat building circles. I believe they have a lot of industrial use as well. I heard the engine run on several occasions prior to his trip north, and all sounded excellent.

Yes it does have an outside helm. I think I may have a pic somewhere. He wanted to cover that helm for the trip north to Alaska. (photo must be on my computer in USA)
brian eiland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2013, 06:04 PM   #20
Member
 
City: Santa Fe, NM
Country: USA
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 20
Brian -

Fabulous looking boat, but not really what I'm looking for. Thanks for the heads up, and for your input. I really appreciate it.

- Steve
__________________

Kawini is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012