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Old 03-23-2018, 09:12 AM   #1
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Pullman Berths

I'm wondering... Is it just me, or do a lot of folks dislike Pullman berths?

For those unfamiliar with the terminology, a Pullman berth is one of those doubles that is built up against a wall. This forces the person on the inside, if they want to get out of bed without forcing their mate to get out first, to try to climb over the other person.

Now, maybe it's just because my wife and I are of the age where we both tend to get up more than once during the night, but this arrangement -- for us -- is an absolute deal killer. Nonetheless, it seems like a whole lot of trawlers have this arrangement for the master stateroom.

I understand that this is an easy way for a boat's designer to arrange things, and it probably tends to make the stateroom look bigger and roomier. But to me it is the worst possible arrangement for sleeping. Even when I was younger, and didn't have to get up in the middle of the night, I did not like this arrangement.

I know that there are boats out there with center-line doubles, or twin beds, in the master stateroom --thank God. It just seems that there are an awful lot of the Pullman arrangements also. I guess I'm just wondering if there are a correspondingly large number of boat owners who actually PREFER the Pullman arrangement. Thoughts?
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Old 03-23-2018, 09:40 AM   #2
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I donít think what you are describing is called a Pullman berth but I agree with you. A bed designed for two should be accessible from both sides.

A Pullman bed is one that is hinged along one side and folds against a wall or bulkhead. Iíve never seen a double Pullman. Of course that doesnít mean they donít exist.
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Old 03-23-2018, 10:10 AM   #3
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I'm with you on easy in /easy out. What I wanted was an Island King. Settled for an Island Queen.

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Old 03-23-2018, 10:55 AM   #4
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Yes, island berths are more convenient but its sure not a deal killer for me. I slept in a v berth for years, that was more like those old submarine movies where the sailors go shooting through hatches feet-first. Getting in and out of the v was a pain but I slept like a baby. Both of the beds in my current boat are against a wall but then I have a 30 foot boat in a 50 foot hull and I still sleep like a baby. When my lovely partner climbs over me, there are certain opportunities presented that should not be ignored...8^)
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Old 03-23-2018, 11:14 AM   #5
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A Pullman bed is one that is hinged along one side and folds against a wall or bulkhead.
Okay, you're right. I think I once heard the kind of berth I described called a Pullman, and that's just what I've called it ever since.

So, if what I'm describing -- a double berth that is built up against one wall -- is not a Pullman, then is there a more proper terms for it?
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Old 03-23-2018, 11:30 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by denverd0n View Post
Okay, you're right. I think I once heard the kind of berth I described called a Pullman, and that's just what I've called it ever since.

So, if what I'm describing -- a double berth that is built up against one wall -- is not a Pullman, then is there a more proper terms for it?
That is the term I would use, and yes, I don't like them.

Well, I shouldn't say I don't like them. I've never had a boat with one so I really don't know but I wouldn't buy a boat with one as long as my wife still wants to sleep in the same bunk with me.

I have a prostate the size of a grapefruit, so I get up a LOT during the night. I just figure it is a good opportunity to check the anchor.
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Old 03-23-2018, 01:15 PM   #7
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Our 90/90 has "Concordia Bunks" which are fine sea going bunks with many advantages


Here is an origonal, the bunk is seen to the right stowed.
.https://www.google.com/search?q=conc...RqhNwEEjRfpPM:
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Old 03-23-2018, 01:36 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverd0n View Post
Okay, you're right. I think I once heard the kind of berth I described called a Pullman, and that's just what I've called it ever since.

So, if what I'm describing -- a double berth that is built up against one wall -- is not a Pullman, then is there a more proper terms for it?
I believe that to be a true Pullman, there needs to also be a wall at the foot of the bed too. In other words, the mattress needs to be enclosed by three walls with only one side open. In a worst case scenario, the open side will also be partially enclosed by a built-in nightstand.
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Old 03-23-2018, 02:48 PM   #9
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Our 90/90 has "Concordia Bunks" which are fine sea going bunks with many advantages
Could you describe some? Can't really tell just from the pics...
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Old 03-23-2018, 04:07 PM   #10
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So, if what I'm describing -- a double berth that is built up against one wall -- is not a Pullman, then is there a more proper terms for it?[/QUOTE]

Iíd call it a PITA Berth.
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Old 03-23-2018, 04:40 PM   #11
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I slept in a v berth for years, that was more like those old submarine movies where the sailors go shooting through hatches feet-first.
The image of me or my wife doing this almost made me spit out my wine.

Great line!
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Old 03-23-2018, 04:50 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by denverd0n View Post
I'm wondering... Is it just me, or do a lot of folks dislike Pullman berths?

For those unfamiliar with the terminology, a Pullman berth is one of those doubles that is built up against a wall. This forces the person on the inside, if they want to get out of bed without forcing their mate to get out first, to try to climb over the other person.

Now, maybe it's just because my wife and I are of the age where we both tend to get up more than once during the night, but this arrangement -- for us -- is an absolute deal killer. Nonetheless, it seems like a whole lot of trawlers have this arrangement for the master stateroom.

I understand that this is an easy way for a boat's designer to arrange things, and it probably tends to make the stateroom look bigger and roomier. But to me it is the worst possible arrangement for sleeping. Even when I was younger, and didn't have to get up in the middle of the night, I did not like this arrangement.

I know that there are boats out there with center-line doubles, or twin beds, in the master stateroom --thank God. It just seems that there are an awful lot of the Pullman arrangements also. I guess I'm just wondering if there are a correspondingly large number of boat owners who actually PREFER the Pullman arrangement. Thoughts?
When we were looking at boats before buying our current boat, I found that some were available with 2 different styles of master BR. 2 separate beds, one on each wall, or a center queen. The center queen configuration commanded a higher price. We certainly prefer (and have) a center queen.

Ken
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Old 03-23-2018, 05:07 PM   #13
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Most boats we are currently considering have center queens in the master, but full/dbl beds in forward cabin, against the wall. Would prefer V type or bunks on one side, up front, as we will have a mix of guests joining us on the loop - couples, two guys, two gals ..... I've told a few couples/close friends about the 'pullman' bed against the wall and apologized - but they all said 'hey, it's a boat, and you are paying - we'll live with it". We keep looking
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Old 03-24-2018, 02:05 AM   #14
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Pullman berths refers to pull down/out beds that were found in Pullman railroad cars, starting the mid 1800's. Usually the berths were singles and a compartment would usually have 4 berths.

The upper berth usually folded against the wall for more space in the compartment during the day. The lower berth pulled out to convert from sitting to sleeping.

Some cruise ships now offer "pullman" cabins, which work along these lines.
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Old 03-24-2018, 02:50 AM   #15
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We've got a one-side-access berth. I sleep on the outside, needing toilet access. Otherwise, partner climbing over me is a joy. The to-the-side berth provides more footroom and better access to drawers.
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Old 03-24-2018, 03:02 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverd0n View Post
I'm wondering... Is it just me, or do a lot of folks dislike Pullman berths?

For those unfamiliar with the terminology, a Pullman berth is one of those doubles that is built up against a wall. This forces the person on the inside, if they want to get out of bed without forcing their mate to get out first, to try to climb over the other person.

Now, maybe it's just because my wife and I are of the age where we both tend to get up more than once during the night, but this arrangement -- for us -- is an absolute deal killer. Nonetheless, it seems like a whole lot of trawlers have this arrangement for the master stateroom.

I understand that this is an easy way for a boat's designer to arrange things, and it probably tends to make the stateroom look bigger and roomier. But to me it is the worst possible arrangement for sleeping. Even when I was younger, and didn't have to get up in the middle of the night, I did not like this arrangement.

I know that there are boats out there with center-line doubles, or twin beds, in the master stateroom --thank God. It just seems that there are an awful lot of the Pullman arrangements also. I guess I'm just wondering if there are a correspondingly large number of boat owners who actually PREFER the Pullman arrangement. Thoughts?
Earlier model Krogen 42's had master berths such as you describe. Later models had an option for a centerline queen. Other than Krogens, I do not recall seeing other trawler makes with side-entry master berths although there are probably some. Defevers all have centerline queens.
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Old 03-24-2018, 07:48 AM   #17
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"Could you describe some? Can't really tell just from the pics..."

I can try,

The Concordia uses 3 ,curved cast aluminum, frames to hold 2 pipes the berth is fixed to and a number of ash boards that serve as back rests. These can be seen in the photo.

When in the cabin used as seat backs the ash flexes more than say a park bench so is more comfortable to lean on.
Because the ash can be seen thru to the hull, the cabin feels larger.

Also when sitting the space behind holds all the bedding, pillows and blankets for the bunk, out of sight with enough room for a duffel bag if needed.

The pipes hinge to lower the bunk and its instantly ready.

One small advantage is the inner pipe parallel to the hull never touches the hull, so a port or deck leak does not get the bunk wet.

Open the bunk rests on the seat and any spacer like a cushion will raise the inner edge causing the bunk to sag , so much better for heavy seas.

We actually installed canvass lee cloths and never felt a need to use them in blue water trips.

Also nice is the use of Sears "piano bench cushions.
These come with tie ons so stay in place easily.

At the time they were $25. each so all 8 in the great cabin could be renewed for low bucks.

Wish I had a drawing of the bunks up and down,
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Old 03-24-2018, 08:04 AM   #18
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For the money we spend on trawlers, better damn weíll have great sleeping accommodations. My first big boat, 40í Shucker, had twin queens and a shower worthy of a house.
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Old 03-24-2018, 08:05 AM   #19
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After chartering a boat we thought we loved that had (for lack of a better term) a pullman berth, I learned it was one of the two things on a boat my wife would absolutely NOT tolerate. The other is a smelly head. Buying a Defever with centerline queen solved the first (crappy photo). Iím almost finished solving the second.
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Old 03-24-2018, 09:14 AM   #20
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I am of the age, but not of the problem so our one-side access queen works well for us. Would I rather have access from both sides? Sure. But not for the trade off of what that other space is being used for.
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