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Old 10-02-2012, 01:38 PM   #21
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I agree when it comes time to work.
Work has more meaning. Others are depending on production.

Working on a boat is really play time.
Like I said. Did you buy it to work on it or use it.

You will find time sooner or later for both.
They really are the same thing.
You can't have one without the other.

Sd
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If you can't repair it maybe it shouldn't be on the boat
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Old 10-02-2012, 07:18 PM   #22
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When I was working, we often said "If you don't have time to do it right in the first place, how are you going to find time to do it over?"
Buy an older boat sometime and you'll find out...as SD points out..,.
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Old 10-02-2012, 08:14 PM   #23
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It doesn't sound like it has worked perfectly if you had to replace them ...

Maybe if they were isolated they wouldn't have pitted ... pitting is usually a different type of corrosion anyway and may not have had anything to do with bonding or not.
You missed my point. The seacocks were pitted when I bought the boat. I replaced the seacocks, installed a proper bonding system, and haven't had a problem in the subsequent 12 years.

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Old 10-03-2012, 07:02 AM   #24
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Well, rightly or wrongly, I suspect the previous owners tradesmen who already replaced this port side cabin wall 12 odd years ago, MAYBE didn't seal the window sill well enough, and last summer an area of rot developed below the window, which with some trepidation I decided to attack myself. Especially when the yard team quoted ~ $Aus2,500 to do the job, and that did not include lift-out and hard stand time, which they insisted they needed to do it. Emboldened by my son's friend, a cabinetmaker, we attacked the job three weeks ago, and doing as much as possible each weekend since, I finished it today. So....as promised at the top of this thread, here are the before and after pics. I think any subsequent owner would accept the result is acceptable, as I'll freely admit its not perfect. My jobs never are...but they are always STRONG.
Top 2 before - obviously... the rest followed as we progressed...by the end I think it looks ok..?

PS. The cabinetmaker only helped me make the hole - that's all the time he could spare, but that was the bit I was anxious about. Once the gaping hole was made, the rest was pretty straightforward as to what had to be done.
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Old 10-03-2012, 07:24 AM   #25
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I think it looks ok..?
I think it looks great. Have you much experience doing fiberglass work?
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Old 10-03-2012, 07:37 AM   #26
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I think it looks great. Have you much experience doing fiberglass work?
Minor yacht repairs only Darrell. However, I have to admit as the previous repairs to the cabin on Lotus were not fibreglassed over, just Marine ply and paint, that's all I used here as well. We toyed with the fibreglass outer covering, then realised it would not merge well when the rest of it was not similarly covered. At least it simplified the whole process.
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Old 10-03-2012, 07:47 AM   #27
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Minor yacht repairs only Darrell. However, I have to admit as the previous repairs to the cabin on Lotus were not fibreglassed over, just Marine ply and paint, that's all I used here as well. We toyed with the fibreglass outer covering, then realised it would not merge well when the rest of it was not similarly covered. At least it simplified the whole process.
Really?! Is the exterior of the entire house, or even large areas, fiberglass free? Just painted marine plywood? I have to admit, the idea never occurred to me. A great solution, elegant in it's simplicity. And, within my skill set.
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Old 10-03-2012, 07:18 PM   #28
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A great solution, elegant in it's simplicity. And, within my skill set.
LOL That is a line my boat's P.O. should have as the quote on his tombstone!

As far as the painted plywood goes, think about the cabins on most wooden hulled real trawlers (commercial variety). Simple, durable, cheap, easy to R/R when repairs are needed
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Old 10-03-2012, 08:43 PM   #29
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Peter, it looks good. If the end product is and looks better than before you started, you have succeeded, whether or not perfection was achieved.
What did you use for paint?
My understanding is many early "Taiwanese Trawlers" had ply cabin construction,and that occasionally it occurs in boats normally of all f/g construction. More than one yard built the same boat, construction varied yard to yard, boat to boat. BruceK
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Old 10-04-2012, 05:23 AM   #30
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Yes, it looks like almost the entire superstructure is painted marine ply. The paint I used was International (Interlux), Snow White colour Toplac. Matches the two pack International Perfection Snow White of the hull.
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Old 10-04-2012, 05:28 AM   #31
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"More than one yard built the same boat, construction varied yard to yard, boat to boat."

Any yard might pop out hulls for locals to finish.

A bare hull was considered a great wedding present for a relative .

Perhaps the start of a new business.
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Old 10-04-2012, 05:53 AM   #32
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Certainly makes repairs easier if not covered in fibreglass - 'course, if it was, then maybe repairs would not be needed. On the other hand, if water gets into timber core...
Heard the other day an example of a new model like mine got a rotted out ceiling which had to be replaced when only 4 yrs old....sobering thought isn't it. They cost $450k.
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