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Old 03-12-2013, 12:17 AM   #1
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Prep Time

How long does it take to prep your boat to take out, away from the dock? Do you have a check-list?

This is for you liveaboard folks too. KJ
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Old 03-12-2013, 12:28 AM   #2
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Depends on what kind of "going out" we're doing. If it's just an overnight trip to an anchorage in the San Juan Islands it takes us about half an hour from arriving at the boat to leaving the slip. The boat is always stocked with food--refrigerated, canned, and dry-- as well as clothes and whatnot.

And yes, we have a short checklist for both getting the boat ready to go and setting it up for us to leave it at the end of a trip. Sort of a pre-flight/post-flight thing.

If we're going out on a longer cruise--- several days to two or three weeks--- then it takes longer because we have stuff to stow, the groundpower cord to disconnect and stow on board, and so on. So it usually takes about an hour from first arrival to backing out.

And if we have guests accompanying us it can take even longer because they have to stow their stuff in their stateroom, we might need to explain some things to them, and so on.
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Old 03-12-2013, 12:30 AM   #3
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Took twenty minutes Saturday. Inspect the bilge, systems check, oil check, open sea cocks, fire engine, turn on electronics, unplug shore power, raise door(enclosed berth), throw lines and go.
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Old 03-12-2013, 12:33 AM   #4
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Not counting the possibility of loading the boat up with lots of supplies or waiting for crew/guests to arrive ... about 15 minutes.

Turn on the electrical circuits, turn on radar, gps, autopilot, radio; check fluid levels, charge fuel, hoist bow burgee and stern ensign, disconnect electrical line to dock, start engine, and cast off lines.

Builders' photo follows. When docked and off the boat, only the shore circuit, inverter charger, and fridge circuit are left on.

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Old 03-12-2013, 02:35 AM   #5
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We have a 15 minute rule- anytime we get the urge to go, we have to able to slip lines and be underway in 15 min or less. Helps us to keep the gear adrift to a minimum.
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Old 03-12-2013, 06:39 AM   #6
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5 minutes....and that includes lines, hose, shore power.

This is my 3rd, often used liveaboard.

My rule is it doesn't stay aboard unless it has a pemanent home that is secure for normal underway operations.

Obviously when the boat is undergoing some sort of repairs the rule is slackened..
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Old 03-12-2013, 08:18 AM   #7
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My boat is ready to go with just a few mechanical checks. Food, ice, and drinks are another story, it depends on where we are going and how long we will be gone.

It's never a race, if it's going to take longer, we just leave home earlier.
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Old 03-12-2013, 09:01 AM   #8
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Never timed it. As Ron says, it's not a race.
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Old 03-12-2013, 09:10 AM   #9
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Can be a race if you want to make a bridge/lock or beat weather (or escape the ABYC standards police ) ..then again a liveaboard or actively cruising is usually a different story...
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Old 03-12-2013, 09:13 AM   #10
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I have a complete checklist specific to my boat. I find I really do need to be disciplined about checking it off though I know it by heart, plus, I enter things on there like fluid levels and what if anything was added, notes on how dirty the strainers are, etc both for record keeping and follow up. Being live-aboards / cruisers, many of the items are done the night before especially if we have an early start scheduled.

I've never really timed the whole process end-to end, there are some variables, such as if we are towing the Whaler or have it up top (also a factor when at anchor), or if we have the Sea Stairs mounted vs the ladder, are we on dock water, and of course if anchored how hard the anchor is to bring up and how muddy it and the chain are, etc etc.
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Old 03-12-2013, 10:40 AM   #11
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We treat our boat almost (but not quite) like car.

Last Sunday afternoon we went out for a cocktail cruise. Arrived at boat with a pitcher of cocktails and snacks. I made a quick check of the bilge, checked the oil and noticed a bit of water in the Racor. Took about 5 minutes to find a container and drain it.

Then fired up the engine, let it idle 2-3 minutes until air heater went off, cast off the lines and pulled out of the slip. Maybe 10 minutes tops.

Pulling back in the slip is even shorter. Tie the lines (3 minutes) shut down the engine. Hook up shorepower and check panel for AC (2 minutes). Grab the remnants of the snacks and cocktails (none ;-) and walk off the boat.

David
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Old 03-12-2013, 11:15 AM   #12
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I could probably do it in less than 15 minutes, but I like to let the engine warm up for 5 to 10 minutes (depending on outside air temperature) before getting under way.

Sadly as I get older a check list has become a necessity (can't remember why). As a charter boat, there are lots of things to be done in the 30 minutes before departure. Customer briefing, system checks, paper work, power cord, dock lines, etc are what come to mind. It's the little things that don't come to mind that are the problem.

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Old 03-12-2013, 11:33 AM   #13
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The Eagle is our home, if required less than 15 minutes as I try to keep the Eagle ready at all times. However, to go out more like a 2 to 4 hours. First have to wash the bird poop off the boat, roll up/take down canvas, take down/stow misc interior items, check things out, start the engine/electronics, double check, greet/infform guests of the rules, and throw off the lines. Then once back at the dock about 1 to 2 hours to put things back. Now if we take the run about/dink less than a minute which we use on a daily bases.
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Old 03-12-2013, 11:51 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by O C Diver View Post
I could probably do it in less than 15 minutes, but I like to let the engine warm up for 5 to 10 minutes (depending on outside air temperature) before getting under way.
Ted
I always "warm up" my engine underway so I move off at no wake speed as soon as it is started. No idling without a load for me, it's bad for the engine.
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Old 03-12-2013, 12:05 PM   #15
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First off, no checklist, although we have discussed putting one together (more for the return/leaving the boat than going out). If everything is loaded and weather is nice, it doesn't take more than ten minutes or so to put up the flag, open the seacocks, check oil, unhook power, and head out. If it is really cold, we may plug in the block heater for about an hour so that we have heat the moment we leave the dock. If we need to load a bunch of provisions and have friends along, then however long it takes to run to the store again to get the things we forgot (i.e., we have a case of beer, but did someone remember to bring a just in case . . . )
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Old 03-12-2013, 12:15 PM   #16
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We do have a checklist and it takes 15 - 30 minutes depending on things like whether we need to fill up the water tanks and if we are taking the dinghy. We usually drive from the fly bridge and the list helps make sure we have everything we need up there. We also have a "leaving anchorage" list with slightly different things on it like turning on the windlass breaker and wash down pump.
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Old 03-12-2013, 12:23 PM   #17
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Quote:
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We usually drive from the fly bridge and the list helps make sure we have everything we need up there.
That is a good point. Since we only drive from the pilot house, everything is already there the moment we step on the boat. When we take out the sailboat, it takes longer to get ready becuase we need to bring out the horn, flares, binoc, chartplotter, handheld vhf, etc.
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Old 03-12-2013, 01:18 PM   #18
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By myself, 5 to 10 minutes. With my wife and daughter, 45 minutes to 6 months.
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Old 03-12-2013, 01:49 PM   #19
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Those that have checklists (Pineapple Girl, O C Diver, caltexflac, etc), would you be willing to share them? I know they are probably specific to your boat, but as an engineer, I love checklists... I just haven't created my own for departure/arrival/leaving yet.
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Old 03-12-2013, 01:49 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brooksie View Post
I always "warm up" my engine underway so I move off at no wake speed as soon as it is started. No idling without a load for me, it's bad for the engine.
Agree that long periods of idling isn't good. 5 to 10 minutes of idle followed by hours of cruising in a day has no effect. Can't think of a commercial fisherman or charter boat captain that doesn't let there engine warm up before they leave the dock.

Ted
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