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Old 03-12-2013, 11:19 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by manyboats View Post
"then up it to 1000 (producing half of the engine's potential 80 HP)". Mark I think half power is probably closer to 2000rpm.
Not according to my JD owner's manual. Two-thousand RPM is 74 horsepower (92.5% of the 80 HP maximum).
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Old 03-13-2013, 12:10 AM   #42
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That's at full throttle.
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Old 03-13-2013, 12:49 AM   #43
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Full throttle is at 2400 RPM. I don't do that; 2200 at 77 HP producing 7.3 knots (hull speed) is the most I'll do.
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Old 03-13-2013, 01:16 AM   #44
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I might be late to this thread/party - but - we try to never be late to leave the berth!

When we get time for a break, Admiral and I usually arrive mid/late eve on a Wed or Thurs to load boat with goodies from SUV and then go to sleep; planning to go out the next morn and come back to dock Sun or Mon eve.

On first morn, while still at dock, I arise early (as always) and begin checking every mechanical, electrical, and other boat portion. Take canvas off the bridge while perking some fine coffee! Then I hose off and brush off the boat while Linda puts all the weekend's interior goodies in their place. Then we go to marina’s dry storage and launch our runabout that gets motored to and close-tied to rear of our Tolly. I start the genset to make sure she's operational, and then warm the twins up... always from the salon pilot station so my ear is real near to the motors as they warm. Then I go onto bridge, restart the warm motors, Linda casts off the last spring lines... and out we go... with our tow behind runabout tagging along!

I start doings on first morning at 5:30 to 6 AM; Linda is at it by 7 to 7:30. We usually get away from dock before 10 AM - - > which means we spend some 3 to 4 hours making sure everything is correct before we ever venture out!

This year I plan to install a high-volume 12V Jabsco Water Puppy wash down system that reaches all the boat and a high flow pressure washer to compliment when/where needed. I have all the parts and pieces ready to install. That should reduce first morning’s dock side wash down by at least 45 minutes... to a simple/easy spray off with no scrubbing... which I could do while on the hook in fresh water!

Ain’t pleasure boating GREAT!!
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Old 03-13-2013, 01:32 AM   #45
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We average more than two outings a month (year-round boating here), with 90% being for just one day. So taking the boat out isn't usually a major undertaking for us. Napa River:

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Old 03-13-2013, 01:36 AM   #46
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That's our target annual average too Mark. 3 if we can fit it in.
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Old 03-13-2013, 06:57 AM   #47
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Quote:
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Never timed it. As Ron says, it's not a race.
Absolutely right. I suggest to my Ex/O the time I'd like to be down at the boat, then I have disciplined myself to just go with the flow so as to be as near to the planned time as we can, but otherwise I say nuss-sing....
The atmosphere is ever so much better that way and we're usually pretty close...but as Alan said, 'it's not a race', the bay won't go away, and we have no bar to cross, or bridge to go under.
Once there, we load any perishables we needed to take, (the frig is always on and ready, so we just transfer frig stuff from a large wheeled cooler bin, (here called an Esky, in NZ Aussies allege we/they say Chullibin), and clothing, books, CDs etc, not already on board, while at the same time I connect the hot water cylinder to the shore power for the one and only time we ever have AC on board other than running the smart chargers. This is enough in the 30-30mins it takes to get underway to bring the water up to quite warm, and the engine running does the rest.

I then go round disconnecting all lines except the last bow and stern line, remove the front window screen, and the flybridge cover if the weather's nice - if not I leave it on for later, then get the engine running, and ER checks done about 5 mins before departure. We then after about 20 mins to 1/2 an hour at the dock all up, disconnect the shore power lead and bring it on board, drop the last tow lines and we are off. The mandatory 4kn no-wake distance being sufficient, by the time we clear the marina and local swing moored boats outside to have her up to temp, and we can ease her up to cruising revs of about 1750-1800rpm.
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Old 03-13-2013, 08:19 AM   #48
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Old 03-13-2013, 11:03 AM   #49
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I like to leave my dock in about 5 to no more then 10 minutes. Fluid levels are on time intervals. I would rather leave the dock and perform routine maintenance at the beach, in a cove or when some else has watch. To may distraction at the dock and if you are to focused at the dock you come across rude.
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Old 03-13-2013, 11:09 AM   #50
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Too many distractions at the dock and if you are too focused at the dock you come across rude.
That happens to me all the time and it really makes my wife mad. When we return, however, without any problems, she marvels at how great a little boat we have.
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Old 03-13-2013, 02:45 PM   #51
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I like to leave my dock in about 5 to no more then 10 minutes. Fluid levels are on time intervals. I would rather leave the dock and perform routine maintenance at the beach, in a cove or when some else has watch. To may distraction at the dock and if you are to focused at the dock you come across rude.
I don't think we're talking about "routine maintenance" here. You don't check the engine oil or coolant levels? You don't look in the bilge for water? You don't check that you can shift into and out of forward and reverse gear? You don't check to see that your steering works? Bow thruster? If it's dark, you don't check your running lights? Your chart plotter? VHF radio?

When I'm doing something important, I don't let people distract me. I've learned to focus. Otherwise, I would never get anything done.
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Old 03-13-2013, 09:42 PM   #52
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How long does it take to prep your boat to take out, away from the dock? Do you have a check-list?

This is for you liveaboard folks too. KJ
After reviewing the checklists that I received in PMs, as well as thinking about how we prep our boat, attached is the checklist that I built last night. My plan is to laminate it and keep it at the lower helm like someone else on this thread suggested.

Please feel free to use, ignore, criticize or contribute.
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File Type: pdf Departure and Arrival Checklist.pdf (267.9 KB, 66 views)
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Old 03-13-2013, 09:51 PM   #53
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Ron wrote;

"And yet truckers often idle their diesel engines for hours at a time."

Yes many idle their engines all night long. Go to any big truck stop and the're will be trucks all around you idling away hour after hour.

But that dosn't mean it's right. Not at all. Fishermen do all kinds of things that aren't all that good of a practice either and they get away w it too because it's not THAT bad of a practice and it's supported w endless old wife's tales and similar nonsense. Most truckers run their engines for hours because they have no Espar or Wabasto so they run the engines to keep warm. And perhaps well over half don't own the truck. Now they have electronic instruments that tell minute by minute the engine rpm, time, speed of the truck and through gps exactly where they are so the practice of idling engines is now probably much less that it was when I was a truck driver
Again, no they are not at pure idle, they put a load on them. For instance, many of those you used to see "idling" have refrigerated trailers. But go around a big truck stop some night, talk to the guys. You'll be brought up to date. In a prior life I had a distribution company that served this market, went to the trade shows, got to know some fleets, learned what's up.
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Old 03-13-2013, 10:05 PM   #54
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Checklist :
- Water topped off.
- Blower on
- Wind direction to see what lines come off first
- Engine start and warm at high idle
- Instrument and horn breakers on
- Fridge DC breaker on
- Hoods off the instruments.
- AC Power down, disconnect and secure cord
- First lines off (leeward side)
- Second lines off (windward side)
- Pull out.
- Pull up fenders and secure.
- Gather lines and secure.
- Set autopilot and get coffee to the bridge.
- Radio check
- Play with GPS, pet dog, adjust autopilot, check depth about 400 times. (It is the Neuse River after all).

I'm sure I forgot something.
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Old 03-13-2013, 10:07 PM   #55
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I keep my boat ready to leave at a moments notice. The boat leaves the dock at least three time a week during normal boating season. We may not go far but try to use it often. I could see using an extensive check list if you are leaving for extended trip or don't use the boat often. When I read this thread if I had to do these check list I would hardly ever leave the dock. I do lift the hatch to check the bilge and a quick peak at the motor then cast the line off and enjoy.
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Old 03-13-2013, 10:09 PM   #56
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After reviewing the checklists that I received in PMs, as well as thinking about how we prep our boat, attached is the checklist that I built last night. My plan is to laminate it and keep it at the lower helm like someone else on this thread suggested.

Please feel free to use, ignore, criticize or contribute.
I personally think you have too much stuff on it, but I have no idea of what level of detail you need or are willing to use.

We started out with a checklist similar to yours but with even more items on it. We soon realized we weren't using it because it took too much time to wade through it all.

So I revised it way down to include only the items we deemed essential to the boat's safety and proper operation. Things like flags, all the various pieces of electronics, life vests, etc. came off. We have no trouble remembering those things anyway.

So it's in essence critical valve, switch, and breaker positions, fluid checks, control functions (steering), and lines. Plus a few items specific to the boat like the zinc we hang down some six or eight feet into the water on a heavy wire off the stern quarter.

That's it, and we find we are much more willing to use the lists before leaving and after arriving, and they have now become habit before starting engines and before leaving the boat to go home.

We do not use the lists as one does in a plane--- read this, do this, then read the next thing, do the next thing, and so on. Instead we do all of it by memory and then check the list just prior to engine start or prior to closing and locking the cabin door after a cruise.

So the lists take less than a minute to use. And they have helped us catch something we forgot to do. If we see something on the list that we can't remember if we did or not, we'll go check it. But so far we've held dementia far enough at bay that if we did something we will remember doing it as we run through the list.
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Old 03-13-2013, 10:18 PM   #57
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I think the leaving the boat check list is more important then the departure. You will notice you did not turn on the ac power on when out on the water. I know I have turned around and gone back to the boat to verify I turn something off or on. Coming back to a boat that lost is it freezer power because you did not flip the breaker is not a happy monument.
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Old 03-13-2013, 10:30 PM   #58
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Before you start taking short cuts, I will relay another one of my favorite quotes. This from the professional captain of a lovely high end sport fisher boat. Everyone was hanging out at the end of the day enjoying beverages in the cockpits and aft decks, and a guy came along and asked this fellow, "gee that's quite a boat, what does it take to maintain one of these?":

"Let me put it this way son, even as we sit here, things are breaking".

I suppose if all you are doing is day tripping on protected waters, you could "get away" with shortcuts. But to what real end??
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Old 03-13-2013, 10:34 PM   #59
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Our fridge is AC/DC and I have glut of batteries thanks to the prior owner. Plus solar panels. I might run the generator while on the hook from time to time. Panel check and line check is part of the shut down routine. I have a photo of all the correct switch positions and lock-ups in case leave the boat to my in-laws to stay on.
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Old 03-13-2013, 11:02 PM   #60
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I didn't put all the start-up details in my post # 44. Reason I don't need a check list is because ALL items needing checking are indelibly ingrained into my mind's eye. When young, I was responsible to be the start-up and shut-down person for well over a decade on our family boats. The reason Linda and I take our time to exit dock is due to usually a month or more between our long boating weekends and that I feel obligated to check all items out and get everything well ready before leaving.

Better safe than sorry... for many reasons on a boat! At least that is how I was trained and still see it to this day. Now, if we lived closer to our berth and used the boat more often (like a couple times per week for short stints as some have posted) the start-up and shut-down schedule may become shorter.
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