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Old 03-12-2013, 02:08 PM   #21
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Those that have checklists (Pineapple Girl, O C Diver, caltexflac, etc), would you be willing to share them? I know they are probably specific to your boat, but as an engineer, I love checklists... I just haven't created my own for departure/arrival/leaving yet.
Matt, if you PM me an e-mail address I will send you one. It is on a spreadsheet.
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Old 03-12-2013, 02:25 PM   #22
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"By myself, 5 to 10 minutes. With my wife and daughter, 45 minutes to 6 months. "

My routine doesn't change much except from winter to summer. In winter and summer the first thing I do is fire up the diesels. If it's hot enough to need A/C or cold enough to need heat the next thing I do is fire up the genset. After it's warmed up a couple of minutes I switch power over then unhook the shore power cables.

After the engines have warmed up (15 minutes in winter, 10 minutes in summer) I undo the dock lines and we're heading out.

That usually takes only about 20 minutes, most of which is waiting for the engines to warm up a bit.

In summer I usually will also hose down and scrub the boat if its dusty. That's about 15 minutes and is done while the engines are warming up.
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Old 03-12-2013, 02:51 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mattkab View Post
Those that have checklists (Pineapple Girl, O C Diver, caltexflac, etc), would you be willing to share them? I know they are probably specific to your boat, but as an engineer, I love checklists... I just haven't created my own for departure/arrival/leaving yet.
Ours are laid out similar to the checklists we use in the plane. It's important not to load them up with too many items. Otherwise it will discourage you to use them.

Ours are on one sheet of paper, heavily laminated. One side has our pre-departure checklist, the other has our post-arrival list. The lists are laid out in categories like the plane's. Only the most important things are on them, things that are important to the safety or proper operation of the boat. So items pertaining to the motors and drivelines, propane, electricity (AC and DC), seacocks, lines, and a few items very specific to our boat.

We keep the laminated sheet in the window beside the helm with one of those suction cup clips.
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Old 03-12-2013, 02:52 PM   #24
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We treat our boat almost (but not quite) like car.

Last Sunday afternoon we went out for a cocktail cruise. Arrived at boat with a pitcher of cocktails and snacks. I made a quick check of the bilge, checked the oil and noticed a bit of water in the Racor. Took about 5 minutes to find a container and drain it.

Then fired up the engine, let it idle 2-3 minutes until air heater went off, cast off the lines and pulled out of the slip. Maybe 10 minutes tops.

Pulling back in the slip is even shorter. Tie the lines (3 minutes) shut down the engine. Hook up shorepower and check panel for AC (2 minutes). Grab the remnants of the snacks and cocktails (none ;-) and walk off the boat.
Takes me longer. Besides turning off electrics and plugging into shore, I take down the flags and give the Coot a freshwater shower.
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Old 03-12-2013, 03:28 PM   #25
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I said it's not a race but I never answered the OP's question.

I haven't timed it, but we usually leave in the early morning around dawn, as near as possible to slack tide. We allow about 1/2 hour from the time we get to the boat to the time we are underway. I check the mechanicals while my wife puts the food and any extra clothing away. If it's a longer trip we will probably do a lot of preparation a day or two ahead of time.

It doesn't really matter if we take longer than planned, nobody is timing us or waiting for us.
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Old 03-12-2013, 04:43 PM   #26
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I think most of you are not telling the truth! You take the boat out dirty, bird poop and all. How gross! You may as well run dirty with your fender down! Not cool!

There have been previous discussions that 2 to 3 hours is spent maintaining/preping the boat for 1 hour away from the dock. In my cases it's a couple of hundred hour for each hour.

Most commercial/charter warm the engine up and check/double check before they leave the dock.



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Old 03-12-2013, 05:05 PM   #27
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Reading the last few posts I must clarify. I'm just talking about how long it takes to go through the checklist. We usually get to the boat Friday night but don't leave our slip until Saturday morning, so we've lots if time for boat washing, etc. we rarely jump on the boat and leave in 30 mins though we can if we "need" to for some reason.
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Old 03-12-2013, 05:10 PM   #28
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How long does it take to prep your boat to take out, away from the dock? Do you have a check-list?
5-10 minutes. Shades up, drapes open, engine started, external check for exhaust water, engine gages checked, electronics on and checked, horn checked, thruster checked, power & TV cord removed. Strbd stern line untied, strbd spring line untied, strbd bow line untied, port bow line, port spring, port stern and step on the swim step, close & lock the transom door and back out. I do this all myself with the exception of the fenders, shades & drapes, which my wife does. Note: I work around my boat counter clockwise as a habit which is why I don't want guests helping with getting underway or docking. (You ought to see some of the knots that have been tied to cleats, not to mention lines that haven't been untied! They mean well but are a PITA.) Also notice that I didn't mention checking the fluids as I'm on the boat 5 times a week and those things are checked very often. I do not have a check list but am being pressured (my wife) to make one.

When I was flying, I always used a check list during pre-flight but only GUMP checked the plane before landing. (Prop planes.)
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Old 03-12-2013, 05:33 PM   #29
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I think most of you are not telling the truth! You take the boat out dirty, bird poop and all. How gross! You may as well run dirty with your fender down! Not cool!

There have been previous discussions that 2 to 3 hours is spent maintaining/preping the boat for 1 hour away from the dock. In my cases it's a couple of hundred hour for each hour.

Most commercial/charter warm the engine up and check/double check before they leave the dock.


As I posted above, we usually leave around dawn so washing the boat beforehand (in the dark) is not practical. We just keep it relatively clean at the dock regardless of cruising plans.
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Old 03-12-2013, 05:38 PM   #30
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Agree that long periods of idling isn't good. 5 to 10 minutes of idle followed by hours of cruising in a day has no effect. Can't think of a commercial fisherman or charter boat captain that doesn't let there engine warm up before they leave the dock.
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Maybe not. I'm not on a dock so it seems silly to warm the engine with no load when I have 10 minutes of no wake zone to go through. If I were on a dock, I would be even less inclined to idle MY engine and disturb my dockmates with the fumes. But then my old engine doesn't really warm up without a load anyway.
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Old 03-12-2013, 05:53 PM   #31
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Less than 5 min.

I've have never had a list and didn't know anybody else did either!

I check the sea cock, bilges, turn batt selector to #1 (start batt), adjust throttle to a bit above idle, shift to neutral gear, turn on the glow plugs for 8 seconds an crank. Adjust for 1050rpm and lean over the stern checking seawater flow out the exhaust. Unplug the shore power chord and secure on deck. Untie the bow lines, stern line and then the midship line, step back aboard pushing the stern out about 18" by the time I get to the helm. Shift into reverse and back out at about 1500 rpm. Change to full stbd rudder, shift into fwd gear and apply 1500rpm untill parallel to the fairway then throttle down to 1000rpm. Then I gradually increase load in steps that bring the engine to cruise load in over 10 minutes and less than about 15. I keep my engine idle adjusted a bit high so when I shift gears backing out (or?) my engine positively won't stop.

Brooksie wrote;
"I always "warm up" my engine underway so I move off at no wake speed as soon as it is started. No idling without a load for me, it's bad for the engine."

As you can see I warm up immediately also but I see no harm in idling. What specifically goes on inside an engine at idle that's bad?
A mechanic told me having a load on takes up some sort of slack in the rod bearings and piston to rod clearances that's bad. I think the "slack" was in his head and typical of what a lot of mechanics will say. Well I'm not picking on my fellow Willard friend but I think idling for 5 minutes is just fine. 15 minutes no.
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Old 03-12-2013, 06:09 PM   #32
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As you can see I warm up immediately also but I see no harm in idling. What specifically goes on inside an engine at idle that's bad?
A mechanic told me having a load on takes up some sort of slack in the rod bearings and piston to rod clearances that's bad. I think the "slack" was in his head and typical of what a lot of mechanics will say. Well I'm not picking on my fellow Willard friend but I think idling for 5 minutes is just fine. 15 minutes no.
John Deere says I shouldn't run the engine at idle (presumably without load) for more than five minutes at a time.
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Old 03-12-2013, 06:16 PM   #33
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Experienced pilots and professional sea captains use a structured list for a reason. My reason as a recreational pleasure boater is that I personally need one even though I can recite it by heart, and it provides a record which can then transfer to the log. Also, I have a relatively complex boat; every time I don't break out the check list, I seem to have missed something.. turning off the block heaters, making sure the stabilizers are centered (and then turning them to "on" once underway), switching over the fresh water pumps, whatever.

My engines (Detroit 8v92tti) are particularly averse to long idling with no load; some kind of load, even idle speed is good for them. In the cool months say when temps get consistently below 50, I turn on the block heaters which serves many good ends. In that case, they are at 100 degrees before I press the start button. So starting the engines is one of the last things we do before casting off the lines or raising the anchor.
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Old 03-12-2013, 06:41 PM   #34
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John Deere says I shouldn't run the engine at idle (presumably without load) for more than five minutes at a time.
And yet truckers often idle their diesel engines for hours at a time.
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Old 03-12-2013, 07:30 PM   #35
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And yet truckers often idle their diesel engines for hours at a time.
Really, when was the last time you saw them truly idle their engine without as load created by a small generator, heater, air con etc? Not to mention most states don't allow it and truck stops set up "shore" pods to provide that stuff.
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Old 03-12-2013, 08:26 PM   #36
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Unhook shore power. Back the van up to the trailer. Drop the trailer tongue on the ball and we're off. It's often overnight before we get to the water so there's plenty of time to get organized/provisioned while Wallydocking.
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Old 03-12-2013, 08:58 PM   #37
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When we bought our boat we asked a good friend in the marine diesel and generator manufacturing industry to describe what he felt were the best ways to treat our engines (FL120s). Type of oil coolant, and additives, frequency of oil and coolant changes, best cruise rpm, etc., etc., etc. Here's what he told us regarding warm ups (I'm paraphrasing as it was 14+ years ago).

He said to start the engines one at a time, checking the exhaust waterflow and appearance from the first engine before starting the second one (my wife does this on the aft deck), and then let them idle as long as it takes to remove the groundpower cord and mooring lines. So perhaps three to five minutes. Then leave the slip and idle on out of the marina.

By the time we're clear of the breakwater the engines will have warmed up sufficiently to take more power.

I bring our engines up in stages just because I like to do it that way. So we idle out of the marina at about 600 rpm. Once clear of the breakwater we bring them up to 1200 rpm for five minutes. Then we take them to 1500 for five minutes. And finally we take them up to 1650.

I have no mechanical reason for doing this. I just prefer doing it this way over going right to cruise power from idle.

While the NA FL120s probably don't need much of a cool down period, if any at all, we bring the engines back to 1200 rpm (a figure I have ingrained into me from flying the Beaver so I use it here, too) when we're about a quarter mile from the breakwater entrance. One of us goes out and gets the fenders over and preps the lines. Then we go to idle when we enter the marina. The time it takes to idle to our slip provides a sufficient cool-down period assuming one is even needed for these engines.
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Old 03-12-2013, 09:49 PM   #38
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I always check fluids regularly so there is no need to check them when taking the boat out. The first thing i do is a quick look at the bilge for water, oil or anti freeze. I always start and stop the engine from the lower station; that way I don't need to worry about the switches from each station being out of wack. Once started i make sure there is water coming out the exhaust. Those three checks can be done in just a couple of minutes then i can disconnect power, lines and go.
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Old 03-12-2013, 10:43 PM   #39
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... and then let them idle as long as it takes to remove the groundpower cord and mooring lines. So perhaps three to five minutes. Then leave the slip and idle on out of the marina.

By the time we're clear of the breakwater the engines will have warmed up sufficiently to take more power.

I bring our engines up in stages just because I like to do it that way. So we idle out of the marina at about 600 rpm. Once clear of the breakwater we bring them up to 1200 rpm for five minutes. Then we take them to 1500 for five minutes. And finally we take them up to 1650.

I have no mechanical reason for doing this. I just prefer doing it this way over going right to cruise power from idle.

While the NA FL120s probably don't need much of a cool down period, if any at all, we bring the engines back to 1200 rpm (a figure I have ingrained into me from flying the Beaver so I use it here, too) when we're about a quarter mile from the breakwater entrance. One of us goes out and gets the fenders over and preps the lines. Then we go to idle when we enter the marina. The time it takes to idle to our slip provides a sufficient cool-down period assuming one is even needed for these engines.
Almost exactly as I do except my idle speed is about 800 RPM, so when backing out of the berth I use that, then up it to 1000 (producing half of the engine's potential 80 HP) maneuvering out of the marina, and eventually working it up to 1800 (68 HP) for 6.3 knots. But then we do have different engines.
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Old 03-12-2013, 11:15 PM   #40
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Ron wrote;

"And yet truckers often idle their diesel engines for hours at a time."

Yes many idle their engines all night long. Go to any big truck stop and the're will be trucks all around you idling away hour after hour.

But that dosn't mean it's right. Not at all. Fishermen do all kinds of things that aren't all that good of a practice either and they get away w it too because it's not THAT bad of a practice and it's supported w endless old wife's tales and similar nonsense. Most truckers run their engines for hours because they have no Espar or Wabasto so they run the engines to keep warm. And perhaps well over half don't own the truck. Now they have electronic instruments that tell minute by minute the engine rpm, time, speed of the truck and through gps exactly where they are so the practice of idling engines is now probably much less that it was when I was a truck driver.

Mark wrote;
"then up it to 1000 (producing half of the engine's potential 80 HP)". Mark I think half power is probably closer to 2000rpm.
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