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Old 04-25-2016, 07:10 AM   #21
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"A showstopper for us would be lack of a walk-around master berth... and most cats we've looked at don't solve that."

For an offshore cruising boat this creates a big problem.

The bed must be fitted with "bundeling boards" or some method of not rolling out of bed underway.

Most folks do not like straps like a seat belt to sleep with.

A boat large enough to have good sea berths , plus island beds would be large indeed!

It's a point, but it's also why we don't aspire to "offshore cruising" over huge distances. I can't sleep and drive at the same time, anyway...

-Chris
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Old 04-25-2016, 08:09 AM   #22
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"A showstopper for us would be lack of a walk-around master berth... and most cats we've looked at don't solve that."

For an offshore cruising boat this creates a big problem.

The bed must be fitted with "bundeling boards" or some method of not rolling out of bed underway.

Most folks do not like straps like a seat belt to sleep with.

A boat large enough to have good sea berths , plus island beds would be large indeed!
I know a lot of boats very capable of offshore cruising and we've not yet crossed the Atlantic but we've done a good bit of offshore cruising and none of these boats have required what you're describing. We sleep just fine in normal beds with walk around berths. This may be an issue on small sailboats, but it's not an issue on ocean worthy power boats.
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Old 04-25-2016, 08:19 AM   #23
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We sleep just fine in normal beds with walk around berths. This may be an issue on small sailboats, but it's not an issue on ocean worthy power boats.
Nevertheless, having spent some uncomfortable nights constantly being aware of kind of bracing subconsciously against side to side rocking in the odd anchorage where ocean swells sneak in, I have often thought that in a vessel large enough for it, (and many are), a bed athwartships makes the most sense, so one is just rocking in the longitudinal direction, rather than side to side. Anyone have this arrangement..? I seem to remember the Nordy 55 had that option. Makes good sense to me.
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Old 04-25-2016, 09:31 AM   #24
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Nevertheless, having spent some uncomfortable nights constantly being aware of kind of bracing subconsciously against side to side rocking in the odd anchorage where ocean swells sneak in, I have often thought that in a vessel large enough for it, (and many are), a bed athwartships makes the most sense, so one is just rocking in the longitudinal direction, rather than side to side. Anyone have this arrangement..? I seem to remember the Nordy 55 had that option. Makes good sense to me.
In an ocean crossing, you're more likely to be concerned with fore and aft movement than side to side. The boat will be stabilized and you're not likely to take the waves directly to your side. We're not talking anchoring. When those occasions do arise of 15' or 20' waves, then you're not likely to go below to sleep but take very brief naps in the salon or pilothouse if you can sleep at all. But those become pretty much "all hands on deck." Regardless you're not going to take those waves on your side.
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Old 04-25-2016, 10:54 AM   #25
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There is lot to like with a power cat. We looked fairly hard at a Endeavour 44'. It had a nice king size bed in the master stateroom and two queens in the other staterooms. Dockage will be an issue at a lot of marinas. We would have had to sign up for a 60' slip locally due to the 19' beam.

To me, the big power cat turn off is the engine rooms. Real, real tight.

The Defever 44' is a real nice boat with a fairly decent ER and having a sea chest is a big plus. The 4'6" draft can be an issue in the islands.

I would recommend you consider a Great Harbour GH37 or N37. You get a nice roomy boat, a super engine room, twin engines, twin skegs, sea chest in the more recent boats and a draft of under 3'. They were really designed for island cruising. The negative is many of them only have a single head.
I have spent time on both the GH and the F37. The F is my hands down fav. Most comfortable, easy to manage boat for its size I have seen. The GH, as the F draw less than 3 feet, but you pay for that added height in spades when the wind blows (and it does) with such shallow draft. The F with no fly bridge drives real nice from the lower helm, no need for a bridge. With that roof you have room for 1000+ watts of solar, and enough left for a power davit and dinghy cradle. Walk around engines, enough room between for a 4 person poker game. 1 1/2 gallons an hour at 7knots, 54 yanmar X 2. Room for 6 built for 2 but that 6 can be stretched to a lot more. Huge, huge stowage. Almost a garage below the cockpit.

The centrally located bathroom is just fine, we had 5 aboard, both male and female. No problem. If fact, I would not change a thing.

With such a flat bottom w/o stabilizers she will likely beat you in heavy seas. The boat is high quality, tough build and will bring you home but a beating will be administered for getting caught.
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Old 04-25-2016, 11:19 AM   #26
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For those that venture offshore and get in sea conditions they find uncomfortable ,

a hammock can be a great choice as it can be used in deck or in the cockpit on fine days.

IF you thought to have them aboard.
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Old 04-25-2016, 11:33 AM   #27
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I agree with Mule above but about the N-37 vs. the GH-37, but I haven't seen an N at that price range yet, otherwise I'd be looking at it. I've always thought if I ended up with one, I'd ask Ken Fickett to add a center keel to it, and although the hardtop would be the better ocean boat, I'd still prefer the fly bridge. That bottom design would be a real challenge to stabilize further than the design itself contributes.
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Old 04-25-2016, 12:07 PM   #28
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Keep in mind that Great Harbours have been (on their own bottoms) to Cuba, the Caribbean, to Hawaii via the Panama Canal, Florida-Bermuda-Newport, etc. All pretty adventurous passages - if that's your thing. Obviously, I have an axe to grind - having been Great Harbour's sales manager for 10 years. However, I have a LOT of sea miles on these boats and before you dismiss their "flat bottom" and assume that they will "beat you in heavy seas", talk to some folks who have been living and cruising aboard Great Harbour N37s and GH37s for years. I think you will hear that, for their intended purpose - coastal cruising, reasonable offshore passages, island-hopping, and above all, COMFORTABLE living - they are the best in the business.

The biggest issue is, as was mentioned, there aren't many N37s out there (or ANY Great Harbours for that matter), so the ones that come up for sale are generally a little above your stated price range. If you are interested in talking to any couples who live aboard and cruise their Great Harbours extensively, PM me and I will put you in touch with several.

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Old 04-25-2016, 12:14 PM   #29
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Hey Larry,

I was never able to discern any meaningful difference in handling or even windage between the flybridge and non-flybridge N37s. The only real disadvantage to the flybridge is in terms of air draft (and price.) And as far as asking Ken to add a keel? Ever met Ken?
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Old 04-25-2016, 12:16 PM   #30
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For those that venture offshore and get in sea conditions they find uncomfortable ,

a hammock can be a great choice as it can be used in deck or in the cockpit on fine days.

IF you thought to have them aboard.
Wifey B: And if you get it swinging enough, it can just toss you on over the side. Sorry, but I had a picture of myself flying through the air from the hammock. Now I want to try one though as I've never been in a hammock on a boat.
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Old 04-25-2016, 12:20 PM   #31
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Keep in mind that Great Harbours have been (on their own bottoms) to Cuba, the Caribbean, to Hawaii via the Panama Canal, Florida-Bermuda-Newport, etc. All pretty adventurous passages - if that's your thing.
We see a lot of them in the Bahamas. One day we saw three anchored together off a small island. We left them with their island and went on to the next.
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Old 04-25-2016, 12:31 PM   #32
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In an ocean crossing, you're more likely to be concerned with fore and aft movement than side to side. The boat will be stabilized and you're not likely to take the waves directly to your side. We're not talking anchoring. When those occasions do arise of 15' or 20' waves, then you're not likely to go below to sleep but take very brief naps in the salon or pilothouse if you can sleep at all. But those become pretty much "all hands on deck." Regardless you're not going to take those waves on your side.
Our trip from the Turks and Caicos to Trinidad had almost always beam seas. On the northern coast of the the Dominican you had the Atlantic swell coming from the north as we cruised east. This continued through the Virgins. Once south of St. Martin we had the Trade winds from the east as we were traveling south.

When I slept underway I found the athwartship bunk more comfortable than the fore and aft master berth.

On a power boat I have never experienced seas in which I could sleep but would be thrown out of my berth.
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Old 04-25-2016, 01:44 PM   #33
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Hey Larry,

I was never able to discern any meaningful difference in handling or even windage between the flybridge and non-flybridge N37s. The only real disadvantage to the flybridge is in terms of air draft (and price.) And as far as asking Ken to add a keel? Ever met Ken?
You know, Eric....that is very reassuring information about the flybridge N37, especially coming from you who probably has as many N37 sea miles as anyone out there. Yeah, you've got a point about asking Ken about adding a keel. No I have not met Ken, but I've heard enough stories to know that even if I did feel passionate enough to try it, it might not be safe to ask him.
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Old 04-25-2016, 02:08 PM   #34
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I've always thought if I ended up with one, I'd ask Ken Fickett to add a center keel to it
Wouldn't that defeat the purpose of a boat designed for shoal draft?
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Old 04-25-2016, 02:11 PM   #35
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I think the N37's already have twin skegs...

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com...9da6b6c7df.jpg

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=...61694228488155

Wonder if these skegs will hold the weight of the boat so you could work on the hull at low tide?
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Old 04-25-2016, 02:24 PM   #36
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Absolutely, the twin skegs will hold the boat up quite evenly if you can find a nice sand bottom with at least a three-foot tide.

In fact, one of the GH37s was DROPPED onto her bow and keels at a Florida marina about 10 years ago. They had set her up really high on the boat stands without chaining the stands together. Bow slipped off - followed by the stern. From several feet up. No damage to the skegs - but the insane G-forces sprung the pilothouse doors and splintered the master stateroom wood furniture.
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Old 04-25-2016, 05:32 PM   #37
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The flybridge model of the N 37 does not (I would guess) add siginificant windage. The GH37, that is a different matter altogether. I pass on the bridge because I would far rather have a huge solar array, minimize generator wear out, while being almost completely energy independent.


There are 2keels, one for each shaft, I do not see how another keel would help anything. They track straight as an arrow stock. A gyro stabilizing system however?? But what do I know. These are heavy boats, with a massive amount of tankage on the very bottom, so they are, in reasonable seas very stable. Short of leaving this hemisphere I would not hesitate, using some common sense, to go about anywhere. AND in comfort.
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Old 04-26-2016, 07:40 PM   #38
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We "planned" on getting another (larger) powercat for extended cruising as our 30x10' powercat has been great over the past 12 years. Trailerable, off-shore capable (a number of cruises to the Abacos), and very lean on fuel (1.5gph at 8 knots, 8gph at 17 knots). But a 36' trawler (twin diesel) somewhat fell into our laps and that will be the extended cruising boat. Note that we have no plans to get rid of my cat as we love that boat too much!
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