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Old 08-03-2016, 10:41 PM   #1
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Portable Workshops

I have recently purchased a Lindmark 41 Trawler. The vessel is a Great Loop veteran and is basically ready to go again, with the exception of a few cosmetic items. However, I know that a 6,000+ trip is going to have some surprises in store for me. Plus, I'm a DIY'er and love to do woodworking. I'considering purchasing a Power8 Pro 8-in-1 system to keep on board. In the past, on other boats, I've had a variety of AC powered saws, drills, routers, etc. on board, which take up a lot of space, and, they can kill you in a wet environment. Curious to know if any of you have experience with the Power 8 Pro system; or, do you know of something that competes with it? I've read their reviews; as usual, there are some who love 'em and some who hate 'em. I'm hoping that some boat owners can share their experience with them. Thanks!
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Old 08-03-2016, 11:11 PM   #2
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Can hardly wait for the feedback on this one. We're planning to do the loop next year, and I've simply got too many tools.
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Old 08-04-2016, 12:06 AM   #3
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Googling power 8 pro 8...


Nope. I don't think so. Sneaky suspicion about the quality. I imagine some of those items might get float tested in anger.

I'd say a DeWalt or Makita or similar 20v combo set with an oscillating tool thrown in would work well. The drill press would be nice. Not much need for a table saw imho, but that one looks pretty weak.
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Old 08-04-2016, 07:52 AM   #4
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A drill-press and a 4" bench-vise make possible a wide selection of quality repairs and makes without injury to self or the work piece.

And yes, Makita or DeWalt.
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Old 08-04-2016, 09:08 AM   #5
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As always, read these reviews with a grain of salt but...
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Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: POWER8 Workshop WS1 Full Workshop-in-One with Armored Case
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Old 08-04-2016, 09:47 AM   #6
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If it's a set of cordless power tools you are after, I bought a Makita set including storage bag and they have been first rate. Circular saw, reciprocating (sawsal), grinder/cutoff, drill, light, charger and two batteries. It cost around $500 through home depot who was the cheapest selling it at the time. I have since added a fein-tool like device that uses the same batteries. I've used every single tool over the past 2 years and am very please with the purchase.
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Old 08-04-2016, 09:59 AM   #7
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Don't think you'll have much need or time for woodworking projects while underway on the loop. Boat problems are most likely to be mechanical - both routine maintenance and repair/replacement of broken parts. With sightseeing, social activities and scheduled maintenance; there is not a lot of time left over for non-essential projects.
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Old 08-04-2016, 10:01 AM   #8
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Beat me to it Thomas....

So far after say.... 30,000 miles of ICW travel along the Atlantic coast...

Not sure I ever needed a power tool to keep going.

Plenty of mechanics hand tools, and even the hacksaw might have fashioned a wedge or backing block.

I carry an assortment of shop power tools to include a portable work/visearch table, circular saw, recipe tool with 90 degree drill head and jig saw, battery drill and screw gun, one handed recip saw, drill bits and kits up to 3 inches, palm sander, 4 inch grinder and just bought a 6 gallon air compressor so I can carry some small air tools if I need to use them underwater.

All but the air compressor fits under the master bed along the water tanks.

Use them all for my summer rebuild schedule when in NJ, but most of the kinds of projects that they all are commonly used for, I probably would not under the when I was constantly on the move during my snowbird runs.

My 4 inch grinder with sand, wire brush, sand flapper and cutting wheels probably is the tool that would assist the most with my mechanical stuff. The air compressor with die grinder and cutting tool will either replace or take the lions share of engine and drive related job assists.
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Old 08-04-2016, 10:20 AM   #9
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It took us 3 plus years to do the loop. We did woodworking projects during extended stops. Purchased a nice Kobalt 10" contractors saw for less than $200 and a $70 folding work bench. Store the saw, workbench and a compressor in the car when cruising. Have them available when the car is repositioned to the new marina. We also carry a skilsaw, jig saw and router while cruising (don't know that I ever used them while underway).
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Old 08-04-2016, 11:08 AM   #10
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I also found in our years of full time cruising and living aboard that wood working tools were largely unnecessary as a "take with" item. Got by great with just a Japanese style handsaw and a drill-driver. Borrowed a Fein a few times. Beyond that I found it was impossible IMO to have too many tools. i had the room to store them and was glad i did. Remember the definition of cruising is "maintaining and fixing your boat in exotic places".

Compactness is important though, due to the nature of access in boats, even my big Hatteras. The small Bosch or medium size Panasonics are many times more useable than full size counterparts. Perhaps the most used were a set of stubby gear wrenches. The big set of ratchets and hand wrenches the least.
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Old 08-04-2016, 11:52 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Spy;
I imagine some of those items might get float tested in anger.
I love this place for harvesting quotes and that's a keeper.

There was another thread on this very topic a few months ago but I'm derned if I can find it. The Search function is incredibly dysfunctional.
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Old 08-04-2016, 12:00 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawgwash View Post
I love this place for harvesting quotes and that's a keeper.

There was another thread on this very topic a few months ago but I'm derned if I can find it. The Search function is incredibly dysfunctional.
Try the Google search...

Not sure how it is recommended...but have had luck with Google and just typing trawler forum first
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Old 08-04-2016, 12:16 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Try the Google search...

Not sure how it is recommended...but have had luck with Google and just typing trawler forum first
Seems bass ackwards to me.
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Old 08-04-2016, 12:18 PM   #14
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The two summers we travelled the most I used was a battery powered drill, a hacksaw and a dremel.
The dremel came in handy when I had to take my windlass completely apart while cruising up thru Lake Champlain. I could have use a file to clean up the main shaft (after the shear pin sheared) but the dremel allowed me to actually have a little time to look at the scenery.
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Old 08-04-2016, 12:25 PM   #15
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I have not been satisfied with multi purpose tools. they seem to do nothing really well and changing the set up for the next step is a pain.

Most everything can be done with hand tools plus a decent drill motor and a good vice. As above a hacksaw is a great tool. One of those hacksaw blade holders is good for tight spots.

For wood work a palm sander and a good small saw with some chisels works unless you are rebuilding a boat.
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Old 08-04-2016, 08:35 PM   #16
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Thanks to all of you for your advice and opinions. Much appreciated! Although I'm new to this trawler, I've been cruising for about 30 years, most recently on a 52' sloop. At age 72 I've decided to give up cruising on a sailboat and do the Loop. I admire the fact that so many of you haven't had significant repairs. My experience has been different. I have repaired cracked dinghy hulls; outboard mounts, galley cabinetry, shower grates, bunk components, etc., etc. I have sailed in Europe, crossed the Atlantic, cruised the Caribbean and Alaska. One thing was common no matter where I've been. It is bloody difficult to get things repaired at all, much less quickly and accurately. Along the way I have amassed enough tools to build a boat on board. And, I'm tired of trying to stow all of this stuff. I don't need construction quality equipment, but I do like to be self sufficient at all times.

I saw an add for the Power8 and Power8 Pro, but haven't been able to find one to look at in person. My hope was that someone on this Forum had tried one, or at least seen one. I would trust your opinions, as boat owners, far more than those from people who have no idea what it's like to live aboard for an extended period of time.

I don't use a chase car. If I need to go home I either rent a car or fly, depending on where I am. For crew changes I have the new crew rent a car and drive to meet us; and the old crew drives the rental car to their home. And of course, we use the car to re-provision while we have the use of it. So, using the car to store tools won't work using our model. But, if you use your personal car as a chase car, it's a great idea.

I'll probably go ahead and order one. If it's decent for my needs I'll let you know. If it's junk, I'll send it back and let you know that as well.

Thanks again!
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Old 08-04-2016, 09:01 PM   #17
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You may be better off taking two checkbooks....
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Old 08-04-2016, 09:36 PM   #18
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Interesting, but I think you can do better. FWIW I'm also a "creeker" (as in SawMillCreek) and a thread on there didn't conclude it was horrid, so that's a start.

I carry a compressor, a Hitachi chopsaw, and a variety of corded and cordless tools. Dremel, Fein, Bosch. I'm a "best of breed" kind of person.


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Old 08-05-2016, 12:20 AM   #19
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You have a space limitation when looping. There are so many tools, spares, parts I can imagine giving priority over woodworking equipment. We've never done woodworking on a boat. As to things breaking that might need it, I don't think of critical things. We don't have wood on a dinghy. don't anticipate issues with cabinet doors, and, if we had them, a cabinet door can be easily enough removed and taken to a woodshop. If one had a lot of extra space, I guess it would be fine, but most loopers don't.
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Old 08-05-2016, 06:07 AM   #20
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A fairly good assortment of battery construction tools will fit in a single milk crate .

Beer is available almost everywhere on the loop, so fewer cases need be stored , leaving room for a milk crate.

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