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Old 08-21-2016, 04:48 PM   #41
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Saw a product that made sense, but can't find it now.

It was a flexible rubber/plastic disc on a stick...you push it through the hole, then it opens into its round shape and water pressure forces it against the hole.

Ring a bell?
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Old 08-21-2016, 04:54 PM   #42
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Greetings-
Through out Southeast Alaska, on commercial craft, tugs, fishing, this product is often found somewhere in the inventory on board. While it is not advertised as the quick fix the 'Stay afloat' advertises, from experience this product will begin the process of leak stopping even as it remains in its initial flexible status.
This product in many cases is known to become the permanent fix.

Read the detail to gain a level of desire to add this to your emergency repair list.
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Old 08-21-2016, 07:50 PM   #43
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Saw a product that made sense, but can't find it now.

It was a flexible rubber/plastic disc on a stick...you push it through the hole, then it opens into its round shape and water pressure forces it against the hole.

Ring a bell?
Like an IUD?
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Old 08-21-2016, 08:10 PM   #44
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You guys are way over thinking this.

just wrap that hull breach with a blue tarp.
Hah, I have a easer and quicker solution.

I am just going to tell the wife to stick her big arse in it!
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Old 08-21-2016, 08:24 PM   #45
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Before you depend on pulling off an engine intake hose for dewatering, close the seacock and try it at the dock. Now add in that it may be under water in an emergency. A lot harder than you think.
And if you have pre-installed plumbing, don't forget that you will need to close the seacock first which means you will need to shutdown that engine or risk impeller meltdown.
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Old 08-21-2016, 09:22 PM   #46
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Before you depend on pulling off an engine intake hose for dewatering, close the seacock and try it at the dock. Now add in that it may be under water in an emergency. A lot harder than you think.
And if you have pre-installed plumbing, don't forget that you will need to close the seacock first which means you will need to shutdown that engine or risk impeller meltdown.

Yeah, no way I could pull it off under those circumstances, but I do have a sharp knife and a hacksaw. Cue the hose above the seacock.
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Old 08-21-2016, 11:45 PM   #47
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Many sport fishing boats, Cabo's in particular, have a y in the intake so you can switch from the raw water intake to a crash pump with a strainer. It wouldn't take much to retrofit depending on your layout.
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Old 08-22-2016, 01:34 AM   #48
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....
And if you have pre-installed plumbing, don't forget that you will need to close the seacock first which means you will need to shutdown that engine or risk impeller meltdown.
No, I don't think so. If it was pre-plumbed for this function, with a y-valve in the intake, with one hose to the through hull, and one to a strainer in the bilge, it would mean a simple flick over to the bilge side would be quite easy, leaving the normal intake seacock open, so that when the bilge was drained enough there was a danger of sucking air, s simple flick back the other way would again have the engine drawing from the through hull normally.
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Old 08-22-2016, 01:53 AM   #49
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Could one of the "Engine raw water pump' advocates offer what a gpm discharge would be? Asking only as I witness raw water discharge from boats there are dry exhaust boats that piss a steady stream and then with raw water exhaust systems, the discharge appears less in terms of volume.
I am sure the size of the engine size/demand are in play, it is the outcome of all the preplanning. Is it worth it or added to the mix as an available source given the urge to plumb the system? Its there so lets do it project?

Stated as one who would perhaps,add another bilge pump in the system as a back up. (I have four pumps in line now in a 27 foot boat-(Belt and suspenders mentality)


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Old 08-22-2016, 02:16 AM   #50
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Many sport fishing boats, Cabo's in particular, have a y in the intake so you can switch from the raw water intake to a crash pump with a strainer. It wouldn't take much to retrofit depending on your layout.
Yup. I have looked at some systems that allow for a freshwater flush fitting along with an emergency bilge pump. I would like to do it as soon as I feel up to tackling those very stiff raw water hoses.
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Old 08-22-2016, 04:58 AM   #51
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Hah, I have a easer and quicker solution.

I am just going to tell the wife to stick her big arse in it!
Then death will come faster than drowning?
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Old 08-22-2016, 06:07 AM   #52
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No, I don't think so. If it was pre-plumbed for this function, with a y-valve in the intake, with one hose to the through hull, and one to a strainer in the bilge, it would mean a simple flick over to the bilge side would be quite easy, leaving the normal intake seacock open, so that when the bilge was drained enough there was a danger of sucking air, s simple flick back the other way would again have the engine drawing from the through hull normally.
Agree if you have a Y valve. They only factory install I've seen used a seacock, tee , strainer, and a gate valve
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Old 08-22-2016, 07:36 AM   #53
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And if you have pre-installed plumbing, don't forget that you will need to close the seacock first which means you will need to shutdown that engine or risk impeller meltdown.
I've been thinking on a way to have the alternative supply line -- with its own shut-off valve -- already installed into our flush fittings. If solved, then the system would work more like crash valves: (partially?) closing the real sea cock to enable the alternative feed.

I'm not sure it's possible to pull the blocking port and insert the flushing adapter (ideally already made up with supply hose and bilge strainer, etc.) while the engine is running, though. I suspect at the very least, big mess... although if this were to actually be necessary there's likely already a big mess anyway.


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Many sport fishing boats, Cabo's in particular, have a y in the intake so you can switch from the raw water intake to a crash pump with a strainer. It wouldn't take much to retrofit depending on your layout.
That's likely what our Groco SSC fittings are. Not as elegant as real crash valves, but potentially usable.


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No, I don't think so. If it was pre-plumbed for this function, with a y-valve in the intake, with one hose to the through hull, and one to a strainer in the bilge, it would mean a simple flick over to the bilge side would be quite easy, leaving the normal intake seacock open, so that when the bilge was drained enough there was a danger of sucking air, s simple flick back the other way would again have the engine drawing from the through hull normally.
Yes, I think it could be that simple. An issue in our case is the throughput; our flush fitting adapters reduce the "emergency" (or flushing) inlet to garden hose size... so not the same flow rate as the main inlet. I have spoken with Groco about an alternative to the standard flush adapter and to be used more as a crash valve wannabee rather than just for flushing, that would allow more flow and also be able to be fitted with shut-off, supply hose, strainer, etc -- and then connected to the main flush fittings in advance.


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Could one of the "Engine raw water pump' advocates offer what a gpm discharge would be?
I'm sorry I have no clue. As it is now, the flow through the garden hose adapter fitting will be less than what the raw water pump pulls through the 2" ports. I suspect pull could run the risk of collapsing the emergency supply hose unless some sturdy stuff is used. And then a strainer at the bilge end is likely critical, assuming all sorts of stuff could wreak havoc on the supply.


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Yup. I have looked at some systems that allow for a freshwater flush fitting along with an emergency bilge pump. I would like to do it as soon as I feel up to tackling those very stiff raw water hoses.
In theory, I think it makes sense and it wasn't expensive to just add the flush adapters. Remains to be seen whether theory would pan out...

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Old 08-22-2016, 09:01 AM   #54
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I read an account some time ago where a guy's pumps were not keeping up. He closed the raw water intakes for his engines, disconnected the hoses and ran the engines to the yard near WOT with someone watching the water level so he didn't run the engines dry.

Don't know if that was an urban myth or not!
A safer bet is a fast flow bilge pump on the prop shaft, if you have space.

It runs constantly, and won't burn up if run dry. It is an open frame centrifugal pump that you can mount without pulling the shaft. Even their smallest pump will work (in either rotation direction) with several hundred gallons per minute. If you have a bigger water leak than that, you're probably not saving it, except by running it aground.

Fast Flow Pumps - Bilge Pump Design

I think insurance companies should discount insurance on boats equipped with these pumps. I'm not affiliated in any way to fast flow... just a believer.
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