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Old 04-12-2017, 01:15 PM   #1
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Piling Restoration

Has anyone had experience with this?

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Old 04-12-2017, 02:27 PM   #2
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I'm not familiar with those but the prices don't look bad. I've seen socks that go around rotten piles that they pump concrete into. I like the idea of these better. They would have a finished look. You thinking of them for your dock?
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Old 04-12-2017, 02:32 PM   #3
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I'm not familiar with those but the price don't look bad. I've seen socks that go around rotten piles that they pump concrete into. I like the idea of these better. They would have a finished look. You thinking of them for your dock?
Yes, if they offer it on the west coast. I have 3 pilings that need to be replaced and to replace them with steel (wood is no longer acceptable here in Washington State) at a cost of 5K per piling. The permit process takes over a year and pilings can only be driven in a 3-monyh period (Oct-Dec) and only if there is not an early fish run.

This would appear to solve all those issues.....

I contacted them for more information.
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Old 04-12-2017, 04:24 PM   #4
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I would be interested to know how this works out.
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Old 04-12-2017, 05:19 PM   #5
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I saw them on Shipshape TV last Saturday. Look at the current episode to see how they work. Looks like a nice way to fix pilings.
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Old 04-12-2017, 11:10 PM   #6
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Yes, if they offer it on the west coast. I have 3 pilings that need to be replaced and to replace them with steel (wood is no longer acceptable here in Washington State) at a cost of 5K per piling.
Tom, why did I think that your dock was on the south side of the river in OR? Is it in St. Helens?
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Old 04-12-2017, 11:28 PM   #7
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No, on the northside (eastside) down river from Longview....
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Old 04-13-2017, 05:28 AM   #8
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Has anyone had experience with this?

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Overall, looks like a good product. However, in Googling the price I see ~$500 per pole and throw in the labor to install and add the concrete, that gets AWFUL expensive.

Here in St. Pete I can get a piling installed for $300, material and labor.

I use the black "plastic" wrap, called piling wrap. My guy cleaned the pole, applied the wrap, labor and materials for $30 a piling, primarily for bug protection. They still get barnacles, but a bit easier to knock off.

Would suspect the SnapJackets would get barnacles, too. However for the price of a Snapjacket, I could replace 2 or 3 pilings.

And FWIW, I just replaced 9 of my pilings and the decking that was approaching 30 years old. WAY better cost effectiveness just replace the piling, using treated 2x6s and the wrap. Total bill for that, including the wood decking, and new supports for a 12 x 18 deck was $1800.
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Old 04-13-2017, 06:40 AM   #9
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In South La, we use PVC or plastic corrigated drainage pipe about 4 inches larger than the diameter of the piling. Cut pipe long enough to cover beaver like cut in piling about 24" above rot from mud line up. Split pipe lengthwise and tie wrap the split pipe around piling. Pipe must sit on bottom of ocean floor. Than just fill with bags of cement. Don't even have to mix the cement. Cheap and will last until your grandchildren have to deal with it.
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Old 04-13-2017, 08:40 AM   #10
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Tom,

Take a look at this product:

https://www.strongtie.com/products/rps/fx70

I have some experience with it. I believe it would suit your needs and should be readily available on the West Coast.
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Old 04-13-2017, 09:14 AM   #11
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Interesting... thanks you for share.. On my marina we have 6 pile on need of replacement.. we ask for metal sleeves or replacement and nothing come below 5K...
I gonna investigate a little more about this system...
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Old 04-13-2017, 10:16 AM   #12
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Overall, looks like a good product. However, in Googling the price I see ~$500 per pole and throw in the labor to install and add the concrete, that gets AWFUL expensive.

Here in St. Pete I can get a piling installed for $300, material and labor.

I use the black "plastic" wrap, called piling wrap. My guy cleaned the pole, applied the wrap, labor and materials for $30 a piling, primarily for bug protection. They still get barnacles, but a bit easier to knock off.

Would suspect the SnapJackets would get barnacles, too. However for the price of a Snapjacket, I could replace 2 or 3 pilings.

And FWIW, I just replaced 9 of my pilings and the decking that was approaching 30 years old. WAY better cost effectiveness just replace the piling, using treated 2x6s and the wrap. Total bill for that, including the wood decking, and new supports for a 12 x 18 deck was $1800.
Pilings here in the PNW and specifically the Washington side of the Columbia River are about $5,000 per steel piling.

When replacing or a new piling it must be steel. This seems to be a little more cost effective.
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Old 04-13-2017, 10:49 AM   #13
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Hi guys. Just noticed this thread. I'm with SnapJacket Piling Restoration Systems.
Would be happy to answer any questions about piling repair techniques and of course any questions of our product.
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Old 04-13-2017, 01:12 PM   #14
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What ddalme said. Sure seems to work down here, judging from the numbers of these repairs I see. I understand that the areas of maximum wood piling deterioration are 1) in the splash zone; and 2) at the mud line. Getting a good "seal" at the "mud line" (pushing the jacket into and below the water line) may be problematic in areas where the bottom isn't mud, but gravel or other hard pan. I'm guessing somebody in the business has figured this out or maybe, in reality, its a non-issue.
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Old 04-13-2017, 01:19 PM   #15
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Hi guys. Just noticed this thread. I'm with SnapJacket Piling Restoration Systems.
Would be happy to answer any questions about piling repair techniques and of course any questions of our product.
PM sent
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Old 04-13-2017, 01:21 PM   #16
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What ddalme said. Sure seems to work down here, judging from the numbers of these repairs I see. I understand that the areas of maximum wood piling deterioration are 1) in the splash zone; and 2) at the mud line. Getting a good "seal" at the "mud line" (pushing the jacket into and below the water line) may be problematic in areas where the bottom isn't mud, but gravel or other hard pan. I'm guessing somebody in the business has figured this out or maybe, in reality, its a non-issue.
Every area of the country has piling deterioration problems, but the issues are accelerated in warm climate areas. This is because instead of just a few cold water tolerant marine organisms, all of the nasty wood destroying organisms live in warmer waters. We see pilings deteriorate worst along the high and low tide mark. This gives the piling the distinctive hourglass shape.
Below the mud line the piling will look nearly new. The lack of oxygen means the WDO cannot survive.
We recommend excavating 4-6 inches of sand/mud from the bottom of the piling. (with a standard powerwasher) Go as far as it takes to get to "good piling. Once the PVC jacket is attached, the sand will naturally fill in around it.

This is usually all it takes to get a good seal at the bottom before you start pouring concrete.
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Old 04-13-2017, 02:57 PM   #17
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Yes, if they offer it on the west coast. I have 3 pilings that need to be replaced and to replace them with steel (wood is no longer acceptable here in Washington State) at a cost of 5K per piling. The permit process takes over a year and pilings can only be driven in a 3-monyh period (Oct-Dec) and only if there is not an early fish run.................
It seems to me that Washington State is becoming more and more anti-pleasure boating.

What reasons do thy give for these restrictions?
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Old 04-13-2017, 03:04 PM   #18
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They are very anti boating. The reason given it protects the environment and fish.
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Old 04-13-2017, 03:38 PM   #19
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It seems to me that Washington State is becoming more and more anti-pleasure boating.

What reasons do thy give for these restrictions?
Restricting wood use is not uncommon due to environmental pressures. You will likely see more of this in the future because its part of an evolution that's been happening for a long time.
In the old days, marine pilings were double treated with Creosote and a cocktail of chromium, copper and arsenic (CCA). This double layer was very effective against wood boring organisms because it was very toxic to all living things. There are pilings in use today that look brand new yet they are 50 years old.
However, we later learned that Creosote was a carcinogen and therefore banned. So we were only left with the CCA. This leaves the piling vulnerable to some wood destroying organisms as it has little affect on some species. With this change pilings were now lasting just half the amount of time.

Today, do to increasing environmental pressure modern pilings manufactures don't put the same level of CCA in the wood they used to, further reducing the life expectancy. As a result we have seen some pilings in Florida and Louisiana last less than 10 years.
Keep in mind that from the very first day the piling goes in the water, it starts leaching these toxic chemicals. Permanently encasing the piling in concrete immediately stops this and is better for the environment.
It gets way more technical than that, but hopefully that explains things a bit.
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Old 04-13-2017, 03:57 PM   #20
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Washington DNR's pricipals regarding the prohibition of treated wood in water:

• From an engineering standpoint, structures require fewer metal pilings than wood, which means less impact to the nearshore environment.(May or may not be true depending on design criteria; these people clearly know nothing about marine structures)
• Metal pilings have a longer life span than wood pilings, reducing the need to disturb habitat with more frequent replacements.(Once again - depends)
• Alternative materials eliminate potential impacts to water and sediment quality that would otherwise result from the use of treated wood.(Ever heard of BPA & dioxin? EPA's Reregistration Eligibility Decision for Creosote (Case 0139) had great difficulty making the case against creosote in the marine environment - but they still just don't like it)
• Safer for herring spawn. (OK - I assume Washington DNR knows something about herring spawning)
• Eliminates related impacts from the use of treated wood, such as environmental damage and cost of disposal at the end of its life cycle. (Not that EPA could find, try as they might)
• All state and federal agencies consistently recommend avoiding the use of treated wood. (Here's the clincher! In the environmental regulators' echo chamber, this gets applause!)
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