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Old 01-18-2018, 06:17 PM   #1
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personal favorites (tips n tricks)

home grown or strait outta "cruising for dummies"

im more partial to the home grown tips n tricks myself....... could be anything from tool storage to cooking tips, lets hear 'em all
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Old 01-18-2018, 07:48 PM   #2
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Two lookouts. Active captain, Garmin and Navionics on board. But nothing takes the place of a first mate saying "what is that?"
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Old 01-18-2018, 07:52 PM   #3
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Here is mine:

When looking for an anchoring spot in a crowded anchorage, drop your anchor 50' or even 20' behind the boat with the most room around him. When you pay out your rode, you will be plenty far enough away from him and when you head up to pull up your anchor he won't be in your way.

But only use this strategy with enough wind to keep the boats aligned with their anchors. Light wind combined with current will make them lay squirrely.

David
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Old 01-18-2018, 08:28 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djmarchand View Post
Here is mine:

When looking for an anchoring spot in a crowded anchorage, drop your anchor 50' or even 20' behind the boat with the most room around him. When you pay out your rode, you will be plenty far enough away from him and when you head up to pull up your anchor he won't be in your way.

But only use this strategy with enough wind to keep the boats aligned with their anchors. Light wind combined with current will make them lay squirrely.

David
Here's my tip, when anchoring, do it away from everyone else. Now if we could just get others to do that.

Ted
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Old 01-18-2018, 09:11 PM   #5
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Here's my tip, when anchoring, do it away from everyone else. Now if we could just get others to do that.

Ted
Or if there are too many people just cook some greasy sausage in the bbq, the smoke will do the rest lol

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Old 01-18-2018, 09:14 PM   #6
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It’s always a good idea to enter a new to you marina at slack tide.
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Old 01-18-2018, 09:18 PM   #7
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Prior to entering a marina, home base or new, we have all the lines & fenders in place. Always amazes me the number of folks that have to frantically grab & throw on arrival
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Old 01-18-2018, 09:35 PM   #8
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Greetings,
Mr. TY. Good topic. I've got a couple that I've mentioned before but it's been a while so...

Put a few cedar shingles on board. Easy to split into narrow pieces and/or carve and rot resistant. Good for filling stripped screw holes, shims, small stir sticks/mixers, fishing floats etc. Easy to store as well in the bottom of a drawer or cabinet (smell nice).

If using a shop vac for large jobs (vacuuming water from bilges) buy a sump pump hose from one of the big box stores and either put your vacuum outside on deck or on the dock while using the sump hose as a nozzle extension. Makes handling a full vac' easier and less messy.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Flotec-S...U-P2/100645330
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Old 01-18-2018, 09:54 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djmarchand View Post
Here is mine:

When looking for an anchoring spot in a crowded anchorage, drop your anchor 50' or even 20' behind the boat with the most room around him. When you pay out your rode, you will be plenty far enough away from him and when you head up to pull up your anchor he won't be in your way.

But only use this strategy with enough wind to keep the boats aligned with their anchors. Light wind combined with current will make them lay squirrely.

David
And as long as the wind or current don't clock entirely with you having a bunch more scope than he has... then it gets really squirrelly...
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Old 01-19-2018, 06:11 PM   #10
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ok, heres my first...... learned this one from the rv'ing world

fresh water hose in winter

ok, lets say you have a 50 foot fresh water hose and it is dipping into the single digits at night still below freezing during the day, here is how to keep it from freezing

go to your fav big box store and buy 10 five foot sections of pre formed foam pipe insulation, the good closed cell stuff, not the cheaper open cell light duty stuff..... in a nut shell the smoother and more void free stuff
and get a roll of that crazy over priced gorilla brand duct tape, the wet weather outdoor kind
now get the appropriate length heat tape for your needs
a 1/2 inch hose would use 5/8 inch pipe foam.... 5/8 inch hose 3/4 inch
on your way home stop and get a roll of heavy duty aluminum foil
lay out the hose, lay out the heat tape along side
snugly wrap up in the aluminum foil and place heat tape side down into the pipe foam, peel the sticky wrap off and seal the pipe foam around the hose/tape/foil assembly

a good wrap of the gorilla tape every 6 inches or so will keep the assembly together (that pipe foam sticky aint the best at staying stuck.... especially when bent around corners)
they make several different corners, elbows, tees, etc.... so configuring something around spigots and valves is just a matter of trying different pieces in different ways

keeping the seam up helps to keep tape on bottom of hose (heat rises), and the theory is the aluminum foil helps blanket the entire hose in heat that it soaks off the tape

i have used this 2 winters now and going strong, i know of people up north been doing this same thing for a decade or more with great results
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Old 01-19-2018, 08:20 PM   #11
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Here's my tip, when anchoring, do it away from everyone else. Now if we could just get others to do that.

Ted
Yep.
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Old 01-20-2018, 01:21 AM   #12
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We normally have anchorages to ourselves, but we went to Pruth Bay on BC's central coast this summer. We dropped our anchor (with 30' of chain and rope rode) so we wouldn't go past the small buoys which marked a line the research institute had put out to keep boats from anchoring too close to their docks.

Late in the evening a sailboat came and dropped its anchor (all chain rode) on the wrong side of the floats and pretty close to us. If we had an all chain rode it probably would have worked, but at about 2:00am we woke up to a knocking on our hull.

Sailboat Dude said something like, "You guys are wandering all over the place and are going to hit us."

I said something like, "Well, you're more affected by currents and we're more affected by the wind."

He said, "Do you want to pull your anchor and side tie to us?"

Instinctively my nose was put out of joint, and not knowing what he had as an anchor and in what state his rode was I said, "No thanks, we'll just shorten up our rode a bit." He shortened his as well.

Not able to sleep for a while, I got out our copy of The Complete Book of Anchoring and Mooring by Karl Hinz and leafed through it to find out what the standard practice in such situations would be.

Turns out it was the sailboaters duty to note that we had a rope rode, what the depth was, what the tides were going to do, estimate how wind and current were going to affect the both of us, then anchor a safe distance away.

Which brings us to the Hinz tip for crowded anchorages; The last one in is the first one out if boats are getting too close and are in danger of colliding.
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Old 01-20-2018, 07:25 AM   #13
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If you have a Mainship 34 and you're docking alone(or any boat really) try it from the lower helm. I find it much easier and have better visibility/sense of speed and movement.

I'll try to think of some more later.
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Old 01-20-2018, 07:41 AM   #14
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When we're cruising and the cabinets are already chocked full of groceries, the microwave is an unused, vacant space where we store perishables like bread, chips & pretzels. The stuff is in bags so they can be pulled out in a hurry to warm something while underway & then restowed easily.
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Old 01-20-2018, 08:21 AM   #15
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A roku stick and an unlimited plan ona cell phone is well worth the price for sanity when underway with two kids.

“Solar” window screen material secured with blue painters tape can be purchased at a large box store for less than $20 and it makes a great additional shade in the front windows on those days when the sun is just cooking everything.

You can never have enough flashlights.
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Old 01-20-2018, 08:36 AM   #16
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Prior to entering a marina, home base or new, we have all the lines & fenders in place. Always amazes me the number of folks that have to frantically grab & throw on arrival
Thats probably because they dont want to be considered newbies for driving with their fenders out. Theres lots of critical people out there who are quick to make fun of someone else.

I usually put out my fenders and lines well in advance. I could care less what others think of me.
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Old 01-20-2018, 08:45 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by MurrayM View Post
We normally have anchorages to ourselves, but we went to Pruth Bay on BC's central coast this summer. We dropped our anchor (with 30' of chain and rope rode) so we wouldn't go past the small buoys which marked a line the research institute had put out to keep boats from anchoring too close to their docks.

Late in the evening a sailboat came and dropped its anchor (all chain rode) on the wrong side of the floats and pretty close to us. If we had an all chain rode it probably would have worked, but at about 2:00am we woke up to a knocking on our hull.

Sailboat Dude said something like, "You guys are wandering all over the place and are going to hit us."

I said something like, "Well, you're more affected by currents and we're more affected by the wind."

He said, "Do you want to pull your anchor and side tie to us?"

Instinctively my nose was put out of joint, and not knowing what he had as an anchor and in what state his rode was I said, "No thanks, we'll just shorten up our rode a bit." He shortened his as well.

Not able to sleep for a while, I got out our copy of The Complete Book of Anchoring and Mooring by Karl Hinz and leafed through it to find out what the standard practice in such situations would be.

Turns out it was the sailboaters duty to note that we had a rope rode, what the depth was, what the tides were going to do, estimate how wind and current were going to affect the both of us, then anchor a safe distance away.

Which brings us to the Hinz tip for crowded anchorages; The last one in is the first one out if boats are getting too close and are in danger of colliding.
Really? 30'. Never have been able to anchor anywhere in NW or Alaska with less than 100' of all chain. Haven't been to Pruth in years but remember having 300' out in windstorm.
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Old 01-20-2018, 08:46 AM   #18
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Here's my tip, when anchoring, do it away from everyone else. Now if we could just get others to do that.

Ted
And never anchor anywhere near where the charts have an anchor symbol.
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Old 01-20-2018, 10:42 AM   #19
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Really? 30'. Never have been able to anchor anywhere in NW or Alaska with less than 100' of all chain. Haven't been to Pruth in years but remember having 300' out in windstorm.
Rode is 30' of chain and three strand nylon, as opposed to all chain...didn't mention what scope was or how much rode in total was out. Get it now?
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Old 01-20-2018, 11:07 AM   #20
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Thats probably because they dont want to be considered newbies for driving with their fenders out. Theres lots of critical people out there who are quick to make fun of someone else.

I usually put out my fenders and lines well in advance. I could care less what others think of me.
Before entering a lock, have both sides prepared with fenders and lines. The first time you don't is the time you'll be moved.
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