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Old 11-06-2012, 02:25 PM   #101
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most boaters are driving their cars when handling a boat and havent a clue as to the dangers around them
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Old 11-06-2012, 03:47 PM   #102
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most boaters are driving their cars when handling a boat and havent a clue as to the dangers around them

In both cases.
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Old 11-06-2012, 07:33 PM   #103
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In both cases.
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Old 11-07-2012, 07:00 PM   #104
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Here in Seward Alaska almost every time I leave the harbor I'm going to expose my boat to at the very least 3-5' ocean swells. That is a dream day. Much of the time we're in wind blown 5' or larger waves at say 8 seconds, as measured by the noaa bouys. Thats why we look at a boats wake as a non event.
If you're in the open ocean facing 5' waves then of course boat wakes are a non event! If I put your 47' vessel in 9' of water on the AICW and a fat sport fisherman flies by you without slowing down, close enough that he could have handed over some Gray Poupon, and you can't very well maneuver so it doesn't clip you right on the beam without running aground, and your sandwich and drink you were enjoying fly onto the deck... And yes you saw him coming, but figured he would slow down, since 98% of those guys keep the hammer down right until the last second but do slow down (and they expect you to do the same to expedite the pass)... But he doesn't slow down even though you did and now you've lost some steerage...

You'd be PISSED my friend, so don't tell us how good we have it on the East Coast. We love to get out in the ocean when it is nice, but a lot of the AICW is a ditch and we operate with A-Holes in close quarters a lot of the time to get to the good places.

My solution is to let The Admiral call the guy an SOB on VHF-16 so everyone can hear, get chastised by the Coast Guard for chatter on 16, get a new drink from the fridge and let my dog eat the sandwich. And if I'm lucky, catch up to see him run aground an hour later since he didn't want to slow down...
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Old 11-07-2012, 07:54 PM   #105
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If you're in the open ocean facing 5' waves then of course boat wakes are a non event! If I put your 47' vessel in 9' of water on the AICW and a fat sport fisherman flies by you without slowing down, close enough that he could have handed over some Gray Poupon, and you can't very well maneuver so it doesn't clip you right on the beam without running aground, and your sandwich and drink you were enjoying fly onto the deck... And yes you saw him coming, but figured he would slow down, since 98% of those guys keep the hammer down right until the last second but do slow down (and they expect you to do the same to expedite the pass)... But he doesn't slow down even though you did and now you've lost some steerage...

You'd be PISSED my friend, so don't tell us how good we have it on the East Coast. We love to get out in the ocean when it is nice, but a lot of the AICW is a ditch and we operate with A-Holes in close quarters a lot of the time to get to the good places.

My solution is to let The Admiral call the guy an SOB on VHF-16 so everyone can hear, get chastised by the Coast Guard for chatter on 16, get a new drink from the fridge and let my dog eat the sandwich. And if I'm lucky, catch up to see him run aground an hour later since he didn't want to slow down...
Thats ther best response I've heard!

I am laughing my butt off. Well put!
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Old 11-07-2012, 07:58 PM   #106
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Thats ther best response I've heard!

I am laughing my butt off. Well put!
X2 for Egregious. Love the grey poupon comment. EXACTLY.
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Old 11-07-2012, 08:41 PM   #107
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My solution is to let The Admiral call the guy an SOB on VHF-16 so everyone can hear, get chastised by the Coast Guard for chatter on 16, get a new drink from the fridge and let my dog eat the sandwich. And if I'm lucky, catch up to see him run aground an hour later since he didn't want to slow down...
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Good plan, life is too short to stroke out over a bad pass. Better to let your wife do it !!

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Old 11-07-2012, 09:20 PM   #108
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Good plan, life is too short to stroke out over a bad pass. Better to let your wife do it !!

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Ha! You don't know my wife! One time she yelled at a guy using only her voice -- didn't need the VHF. And what she yelled was so astoundingly profane and yet creative that the guy turned around to see what kind of person would say such a thing to another boater.

But seriously, this doesn't happen too often. More often a nice slow pass takes place, and mostly with no radio contact required except when I get thanked for slowing to idle to make it easy for the passer.

I'm glad y'all see the humor in what I said before. Sometimes we call a boat "Rodney Dangerfield" when we spot them coming up from behind since they remind us of of his boat in "Caddyshack" when he causes mayhem driving a large yacht. You remember, "Hey, you scratched my anchor!"
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Old 11-07-2012, 09:46 PM   #109
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Yep, I think Egregyious gave a pretty good picture.

For anyone that has not boated in the ICW, it is difficult to imagine a 1100 mile stretch of water with many narrow channels. While it crosses or runs along some wide stretches of water there are many that go for miles with 50 to 100 yard wide dredged channels. Many of the dredged channels are in wide bodies of water, but go outside the markers if you want big trouble. Some places outside the channel are 3' or less.

We are one of the fastest cruising boats that regularly cruise long distances on the ICW. Therefore, we do a lot of passing. We will usually call on the radio for a slow pass. That is usually answered and complied with. We will slow, pass, and pick up speed again. In the spring and fall migration that can happen 50 times a day. When at a popular stopping place, most of the boats will leave within an hour or so of each other. So, sometime in late morning we will usually have most of our passing done.

If they won't answer the radio, pull over a little, and slow down we will slow to a little over their speed as we start getting up beside them. We have air horns, and will use them. If now response we will pick up enough speed to pass them. If it is wide enough, we will swing wide and get by them. That does not happen much.

We have had some stupid situations arise. On one trip South coming out of Adams Creek canal, We came up on the stern of about a 39' tug style that would not answer our calls. They were making about 11 knots. They were closed in the pilot house, and did not hear our horns. We picked up speed to get around. We spent a few days in Morehead City. Later we passed them again below Georgetown as we were in a narrow dredged cut. Same lack of response. I think the name on the boat was Miss Dolly or something similar. Later that day they pulled in behind us on the Mega Dock at Charleston. They were not happy. They walked by the boat, and I told them of the failed attempts to contract them. They cut loose about my radio not working, I didn't call, I must have had it on high power and the signal went over, they would have heard air horns. I told them if they heard an apology from me I was taking it back. It would be a good idea if they left after I did in the morning.

I have had others look at me, and I actually motioned for them to slow. They didn't. I try to give a courteous pass, but if it doesn't work, I will not cruise a 25 knot boat at 7 knots because they don't cooperate in a good pass.

As I tell Lou, we give a courteous pass if for no other reason the one you pass may be your slip mate that night.
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Old 11-07-2012, 10:15 PM   #110
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... They cut loose about my radio not working, I didn't call, I must have had it on high power and the signal went over, ...
I don't get it. How is it that having one's radio on high power reduce a VHF radio's short-range communication? Are you kidding? Do believe having one's radio on low power reduces range, however.
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Old 11-08-2012, 06:36 AM   #111
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Do believe having one's radio on low power reduces range, however. __________________

One big hassle is the ditch runners will frequently have a huge antenna that is laid down to pass under some bridges.

Use low power on a laid flat antenna and the range is really minor.

Our boat is low (under 10ft) so we use a sailboat mast head style SS antenna with a coil on the bottom.

This does work OK at low power to talk to bridges and locks.

Not all that bad at modest distances as it is always vertical.

Sometimes a hand held is the easiest cure for a huge laid down antenna.

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Old 11-08-2012, 07:58 AM   #112
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I don't get it. How is it that having one's radio on high power reduce a VHF radio's short-range communication? Are you kidding?
Many people believe that a radio signal at high power somehow passes over their boat at close range. It's some of the misinformation perpetuated on boating forums. I suppose they are thinking (if they are thinking at all) of trying to make the water from a hose go further by pointing the hose higher.

It is possible to overload a receiver with a very strong signal at very close range, but I'm talking about a very few feet, not the distance moving boats would normally be from each other.
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Old 11-08-2012, 08:04 AM   #113
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A larger, faster boat did throw me a severe wake once northbound on the ICW in Hilton Head, SC. Later that day, we saw the boat and a PWC "playing around" just south of Beaufort, SC.

The entire waterfront in Beaufort is a posted no wake zone and when this guy and his PWC finished playing and headed past Beaufort on "semi-plane", a marina operator called him on the radio and gave him hell about his wake.

Thinking back to the wake he threw me, I joined in and stirred the pot.

Later, I tried to find the owner's name on the Internet, but it wasn't on the documented boat website so it must have been a state registered boat even though it was 40' long or more.
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Old 11-08-2012, 09:02 AM   #114
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Many people believe that a radio signal at high power somehow passes over their boat at close range. It's some of the misinformation perpetuated on boating forums..
And not just boating forums. Were told this almost immediately after buying our boat in 1998. We have always kept our radio on high power (other than the channels that automatically select low power when they are selected). We have never had a problem being heard even by boats that were cruising within a couple of boat lengths of the 24 foot antenna that's connected to our lower radio or when communicating with a boater already on a dock as we moved in to raft to him. Our non-issue with using high power at all times has caused me to wonder from time to time about what we'd heard about high power signals "skipping over" close-by boats. We have never experienced this and in the end I figured it simply isn't true.
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Old 11-08-2012, 12:46 PM   #115
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That is the only complaint that was ever voiced about my radio not working. We passed many other boats on the same days, and it worked for them high or low power. My guess is they were cruising on a working channel, and did not select dual watch. Whatever it was, that tirade was not called for. I was just trying to find out why our communication did not work.
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Old 11-08-2012, 04:25 PM   #116
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That is the only complaint that was ever voiced about my radio not working. We passed many other boats on the same days, and it worked for them high or low power. My guess is they were cruising on a working channel, and did not select dual watch. Whatever it was, that tirade was not called for. I was just trying to find out why our communication did not work.
Sometimes folks at my marina set out on a cruise and somebody will select a channel to communicate on, usually 68 or 69. I don't bother to suggest contacting on 16 and then switching, I figure they should know that but I'm not going to upset the cart. If I hail them on 16 and don't get an answer, I switch to whatever they selected.

I keep my VHF on scan unless a pair of Bubbas decide to spend 20 minutes on one of the scanned channels talking about fishing or where the're going tonight. Then I just switch to 16 until we're out of range or they run out of things to talk about.

And then there was the time when someone, obviously docked at the City Marina, was using the VHF to communicate back and forth with passengers who were touring the city (on land) and using a handheld VHF.
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Old 11-08-2012, 05:04 PM   #117
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Yep, I think Egregyious gave a pretty good picture.

We have had some stupid situations arise. On one trip South coming out of Adams Creek canal, We came up on the stern of about a 39' tug style that would not answer our calls. They were making about 11 knots.
And here is an example of someone who makes their own life miserable because they don't understand the Slow Pass. Somewhere north of Charleston we were behind a large sailboat. I was making 8 knots and he was making maybe 7.7 knots and I slowly caught up. I attempted over and over to make radio contact but never received an answer. Finally I gave two blasts on the horn and began to pass on his port side, although slowly. I swear he sped up! I had already committed to pass and it was a nice wide area so I thought I would just keep going. Well, I had to pour on all the steam I had to get around...

Just a little while later a 47' Coast Guard lifeboat came along. He tried the same as me to make radio contact. After no contact could be made he steamed around, and as you might know, these boats throw a HUGE wake going anything more than 8 knots, and since the sailboat wouldn't slow down he passed at maybe 10-11 knots and rocked the crap out of the sailboat. Well, he finally broke radio silence and actually yelled at the Coast Guard saying "that was the rudest pass we've had in a week!"

When he came up behind me I slowed to idle and he passed with barely a bump.
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Old 11-08-2012, 05:25 PM   #118
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I don't get it. How is it that having one's radio on high power reduce a VHF radio's short-range communication? Are you kidding? Do believe having one's radio on low power reduces range, however.
-----------------------------------------------
You are right, it doesn't happen. Wives tales!!

People are confusing an atmospheric phenomenon called "skip" or "Skywave", which occurs in low frequency radio signals. At low frequencies, there may be times when two stations 10 miles apart can't talk to each other, yet these same two stations can talk to other stations that are a thousand miles away. This is caused by atmospheric conditions when the ionosphere reflects low frequency radio waves back toward Earth at a great distance from their source. Since it is not limited by the earths curvature the signal may be strongly heard hundreds and maybe even thousands of miles away. Yet someone 10 or 20 miles away from the transmitter hears nothing but static. This is the basis of low power AM amateur (Ham) communications. It mostly occurs in the shortwave frequency bands.

Two "properly functioning" VHF marine radios, on the same frequency, volume level turned up, and within close proximity, line of sight of each other, will hear each other at either low or high power settings.

p.s. If you want to experience "Skip" conditions, turn your CB radio on, open the squelch up and at certain times of the day, earlier morning or in the evening, you will hear other stations talking many many miles away. Here in the PNW we routinely hear CB'ers from Texas and Alabama chatting and their signals fading in and out as the skip conditions change.

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Old 11-08-2012, 05:56 PM   #119
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So, refresh my memory. When and why should one select low or high power on one's VHF.
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Old 11-08-2012, 07:00 PM   #120
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So, refresh my memory. When and why should one select low or high power on one's VHF.
-----------------------------------
There are some marine channels that have low power restrictions. If you have a newer VHF marine radio, it should automatically select the low power setting on these channels.

On channel 16, I usually use high power as I'm hailing vessels or the Coast Guard who are at an unknown or considerable distance away and you want to be heard first time.

When traveling with another boat, we will often use our handhelds on low power to talk back and forth at short ranges. The portable antennae closer to the water or inside the cabin limits the propagation range even further.

When communicating with another boat, a Harbor Master, bridge tender, marina, repair yard, at close range line of sight of about one mile or less, use low power setting. Lower transmitter power will reduce the propagation distances, allowing more users to use the channel without interfering with each other. With the advent of cellular phones, it's probably less of a big deal. But the idea of the high and low power setting is about being a good boater and sharing a limited resource.

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