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Old 04-18-2017, 09:14 AM   #1
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Passagemakers under 46'

You don't need a big expensive boat and sumptuous interiors to cross oceans as proven by the many solo sea kayaking ocean crossings done to date.

Do you know of any diesel powered boats under 46' designed to be passagemakers?

Here's a start to the list that I scratched up this morning;

Tad Roberts Passagemaker Lite 39 - Tad Roberts' fast, seaworthy, fuel-efficient long-range passagemaker

LOA: 39' 5"
LWL: 38' 4"
Beam: 11' 0"
Draft: 3' 0"

1,100 gallons fuel, twin 75hp engines

Michael Kasten 30' Buster - Kasten Marine Design

29' 9" LOA
10 '6" Beam
4' 6" Loaded Draft.

4,000 nm at 5.5 knots
3,000 nm at 6 knots
2,400 nm at 6.5 knots
600 gallons fuel, 55hp engine

Michael Kasten 36' Greatheart - Kasten Marine Design

DWL: 29' - 5"
Beam: 10' - 3"
Draft: 4' - 3"
Loaded Displacement: 22,000 lb.

...the intent of the Greatheart 36 design shown here has been to create an aluminum trawler yacht as simply as possible for economy, and as rugged and seaworthy as possible for long range ocean passages.

Michael Kasten 43' Roberta - Kasten Marine Design

43' - 0" Length on Deck
12' - 6" Moulded Beam
5' - 1" Draft - Half Load

Roberta should achieve around 3,000 NM at 7 knots on a fuel capacity of 800 USG with 12% held out as reserve.

800 gallons, 85hp engine

Branson Boat Design Passagemaker 40/44 Trawler yacht | Branson Boat Design Dutch Barges
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Old 04-18-2017, 09:23 AM   #2
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Kasten Marine has some of the coolest designs IMO. I love their motorsailers.
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Old 04-18-2017, 09:40 AM   #3
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Seems to me that a 40 Willard, especially the pilothouse model would be a great passagemaker.
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Old 04-18-2017, 11:01 AM   #4
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Richard could testimony that a Kadey Krogen 42 is a passage maker.
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Old 04-18-2017, 11:09 AM   #5
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For a passage maker in the mentioned size bracket I'd most definitely go for a sailboat, but that wasn't the question... forced to choose a motor boat, I'd go for something like this or this with suitable modifications.

As for actually contributing to the thread, many of Bruce Roberts' designs are supposed to be intended as passage makers, although they appear breakable to my eye and have gathered a reputation for mediocre performance.
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Old 04-19-2017, 10:56 PM   #6
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Bob Warman, designer/builder of the Camano Trolls also designed/built a 36 ft vessel which was intended for the trip to Hawaii. There were only a few built so no real stock of them and it was specialized enough that there was not a lot of demand I guess. My wife and I took a look but a custom like that was way out of our price range.

So a passagemaker it would be.

It was written up in the early 90's. I did see one which was for sale many years ago.
I did a bit of searching but can find nothing about it.

And no, it was not the 41 which has now become the Bracewell 41.
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Old 04-19-2017, 11:47 PM   #7
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C lectric.
Was it an aft pilot house with a low and long trunk cabin forward? I saw a boat years ago from the same builders as the Camano. Aluminum and VERY nice. An older gentleman was living on it and had named her Uijeongbu (we Jong boo) after the Korean city. He invited my wife and I aboard, i was impressed. I have frequently thought of her over the years. Never saw another like her.
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Old 04-19-2017, 11:59 PM   #8
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Post Ocean crossers

The big thing when crossing an ocean is a hull design that can take what ever weather & seas that you get.
When your doing a 2 week or 3 week ocean crossing the weather changes & is usually different than forecast.
So you need a full displacement hull with Ballast down in the keel not unlike a sailboat.
This gives you the low center of gravity you need to take what ever the sea dished out to you.
Next you need strength, reliability, capacity to carry 3 weeks of food & water & of course fuel range.
Nordhavn, Kadey-Krogen & Selene come to mind as does Willard & several others.
Having the equipment on board set up for reliability is very important when you 2 K + miles from home.
Good luck with your search.
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Old 04-20-2017, 12:20 AM   #9
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The big thing when crossing an ocean is a hull design that can take what ever weather & seas that you get.
When your doing a 2 week or 3 week ocean crossing the weather changes & is usually different than forecast.
So you need a full displacement hull with Ballast down in the keel not unlike a sailboat.
This gives you the low center of gravity you need to take what ever the sea dished out to you.
Next you need strength, reliability, capacity to carry 3 weeks of food & water & of course fuel range.
Nordhavn, Kadey-Krogen & Selene come to mind as does Willard & several others.
Having the equipment on board set up for reliability is very important when you 2 K + miles from home.
Good luck with your search.
Alfa Mike
You should read Tad Roberts rational for his Passagemaker Lite series. There's logic behind his go long, go thin, go lite, and go shallow draft when the trade off is much faster passages. Small and plump boats would have to go pretty slow to conserve fuel and would either have stabilizers or paravanes for comfort, just like Tad recommends for his Lite boats. Just a thought...
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Old 04-20-2017, 01:04 AM   #10
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I'll Add to AlfaMike's list, livability for a few months, not just three weeks and the ability to fix things in the engine room.

Much of the Tad Robert's designs strike me as boats for a person who wants to transition from sail to motor would like. They then buy the plans and before it ever gets built, they realize why build a motor boat with all the disadvantages of a sailboat?

Did you read Robert's own comments on the roll period for his 39?
You would dive overboard half way across figuring you would be better off swimming.
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Old 04-20-2017, 03:05 PM   #11
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In addition to those already mentioned, the Nordhavn 40. That and the Krogen 42 are two of my favorite small passagemakers.
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Old 04-20-2017, 03:53 PM   #12
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As alfamike notes above, a blue water passage requires that you and your boat be able to take anything that mother nature throws at you long after the last weather forecast you got before leaving is meaningless.

As he notes there are several criterion to meet for a boat to be considered a blue water passagemaker:

Scantlings- basically built in hull, superstructure and window strength.
Stability- hull shape, ballast and well designed engine vents
Robust systems- engine fuel system, electrics, navigation electronics
Engine reliablility, spare parts and skipper smarts to be able to fix stuff at sea.

These things don't come cheap. You will spend 2-3 times more for a real blue water passagemaker as an equivalent aged coastal trawler. And the skipper is a big part of the equation.

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Old 04-20-2017, 05:06 PM   #13
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You may want to consider going up 2 more feet and consider the Hatteras 48 LRC. Has range, full displacement hull, and comfort.
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Old 04-20-2017, 08:08 PM   #14
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You may want to consider going up 2 more feet and consider the Hatteras 48 LRC. Has range, full displacement hull, and comfort.
Thanks for the tip.

I'm not looking for a smaller passagemaker at this time...just started this thread as an alternative to the other passagemaker threads where things unerringly drift towards larger, more expensive boats.

There may be a time in the future where we'll consider such a boat, because as sea kayakers we used to go on 2 month long trips without going near cities or stores. Would be great to have the fuel capacity so we could stay "out there" for 2 months or more, where we could anchor in select locations for a couple weeks at a time.
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Old 04-20-2017, 08:18 PM   #15
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C lectric.
Was it an aft pilot house with a low and long trunk cabin forward? I saw a boat years ago from the same builders as the Camano. Aluminum and VERY nice. An older gentleman was living on it and had named her Uijeongbu (we Jong boo) after the Korean city. He invited my wife and I aboard, i was impressed. I have frequently thought of her over the years. Never saw another like her.


Yes, that description sounds like the boat I remember. I still wonder where she went.
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Old 04-21-2017, 09:35 AM   #16
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(...)
Would be great to have the fuel capacity so we could stay "out there" for 2 months or more, where we could anchor in select locations for a couple weeks at a time.
Two months isn't difficult at all. I get about a year out of my 1.500 liters, so with a water maker on board, most modern motor yachts (even fast ones) should be able to loiter for months.
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Old 04-21-2017, 09:47 AM   #17
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Two months isn't difficult at all. I get about a year out of my 1.500 liters, so with a water maker on board, most modern motor yachts (even fast ones) should be able to loiter for months.
That's about 400 US gallons...our boat came with two 50 gallon tanks and had another 40 gallon tank added by a previous owner, so we have about 450 liters of usable fuel. The previous owner also installed a larger engine, so consumption went up.
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Old 04-21-2017, 09:51 AM   #18
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I'm making the crossing in 2 weeks or so. (weather window). I'll let you know if it is a good passagemaker.
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Old 04-21-2017, 10:30 AM   #19
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Yes, that description sounds like the boat I remember. I still wonder where she went.

There is one located at a marina in Anacortes, WA. The present owner, a retired tug engineer and former Willard owner, has done a major refit since acquiring it several years ago. I've been aboard and really liked the layout -- stateroom, head and galley down and forward, followed aft by a spacious "wheelhouse" (helm and saloon area). The cockpit was adequate and enclosed with doors leading to narrow side decks. Overall appearance is long and narrow -- nice!
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Old 04-21-2017, 10:33 AM   #20
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I have read a ton of references to window strength over the years. I don't have too much offshore experience, although I have sailed from Seattle to Hawaii and back, and been through some horrific bar crossings while fishing on Washingtons coast. I have never seen anything that would come close to knocking out good quality aluminum framed, tempered glass windows. How big a risk is this really? I am asking for places you would go pleasure cruising, not deadliest catch in Alaska in the middle of winter. I defiantly get it with rubber framed cheapo windows, or 40 year old wooden Taiwanese windows that may not have had tempered glass, and may not have been maintained properly over the years.
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