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Old 04-01-2012, 02:30 PM   #21
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Rochepoint. Yes I have seen the videos and have read Tony's story. My wife and I are in no hurry. Taking our time to enjoy all there is to see is a big part of us making this jump.
Thank for your input.
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Old 04-01-2012, 02:40 PM   #22
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I'm not quite a trawler pro yet, but I don't think you can go wrong with a Fleming. Especially given the reasons you have outlined.
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Old 04-01-2012, 02:43 PM   #23
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Ksanders. That is a every good point. 6 to 8 people on board beside my wife and I on week trips. Long trip 4 to with my wife and I. 3 state rooms plus a crew cabin that sleeps 2 and one of state room that will sleep 3 if needed. The one of the reason why I want the Fleming is that bill it as a couples vessel. Easy to handle for a couple as they say. With it's low profile and the test runs I have made with a F-75 we had no trouble handling the 75 with just the 2 of use. Docking and all. As far as a full time crew. No.. The day we cannot handle her is the day we go back to dirt.. LOL we both are 50 so I do not see that happening for sometime Knock on teck wood! lol

My wife and I are both hard workers.. So activies will be working the vessel and taking care of her during the day... Night time is kick back and relax and enjoy the furits of a hard days work.. Thanks for your input

Good, then you've thought it out. Thats a recipe for happy boating.

One thing you'll need to outfit the boat is satellite communications.

We went with the KVH systems model V3. This gives us telephone and internet anywhere in the world. We have a US based number so folks can reach us easily.

Onboard we have both wired and cordless phones tied to the system. Our internet is both wired and wi-fi. That is a very nice feature. We get around 2MB download speeds, but upload is limited to 128K

For a boat that large I'd recommend either the V3 or the larger version being the V7. With the V7 you get the same upload speed as the download.

Either way KVH support is great. They have a 24X7 staffed NOCC, and can remote in to your unit any time to run system checks etc... They also have repair technicians world wide to fix it if it breaks.
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Old 04-01-2012, 08:14 PM   #24
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Markpierce.. A good friend of mine has a old shimp boat with a 3,200 USG fuell tank. it took around a 1hour to fill her using a 4" hose from a Fuel tank Truck.
Did a little research. The typical gas pump has a rate of between 50 to 10 gallons a minute. (Isn't the normal pump nozel an inch or less in diameter?) So, loading 3000 gallons of fuel would take between 5 and 10 hours! Presume you won't load up at the typical marina gas dock.

What's the diameter of a Fleming's fuel loading ports?
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Old 04-01-2012, 11:28 PM   #25
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Another system you might seriously consider is a sewage treatment system.

There are lots of places where it might be illegal or impurdent to macerate your waste, and pumpouts are not readily available. Especially for a boat that size.

A sewage treatment system solves that problem. We have used sewage treatment systems on our boats for many years with no issues.

Our current boat has a raritan hold N treat control tied to a Purasan treatment system. This works well for our boat since we use fresh water in the heads. If you're going with salt water heads the electro-scan is a good option.

For a boat that size you might want to consider one of the micro biological units on the market. Raritan makes one of these units as well.

Although there are areas in the US and probably world wide that strictly prohibit discharge of any kind, sewage treatment systems solve the sewage discharge issue in most sal****er locations. A treatment system coupled with a holding tank and lockout would be legal pretty much anywhere.
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Old 04-02-2012, 12:41 AM   #26
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The Flemming will be an awesome boat, and no worries about handling it, you'll get the hang of it. I would be concerned about the engines though, there massive, and no doubt very thirsty. I'd recommend you think carefully about how fast you really need to go. A small decrease in speed would allow you to down size the engines, reduce fuel consumption and maintenance costs, and increase range with the same size tanks. Over the life of the boat, the fuel savings will be dramatic, money you could spend on things that are way more fun than diesel. ........Arctic Traveller

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Old 04-02-2012, 12:57 AM   #27
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The typical gas pump has a rate of between 50 to 10 gallons a minute.
Meant to say between 5 and 10 gallons.
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Old 04-02-2012, 06:03 AM   #28
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AS you intend long passages 3 items I would want.

#1 a ship style centrifugal fuel cleaner as you will be fueling from drums and other interesting sources.

A tiny electric pump and a toss away filters doesn't cut it.

Second would be fuel tanks that are servicable , see the archives for a good design to hand to the builder. When he whines its not a great fit with some furniture , remind him of who is paying for the boat , and who will be inoperative from cheap boxes of fuel, instead of real servicable tanks.

Third I would demand A CPP, controlable pitch prop ,if its not included, to allow you to increase the range when operating in long range displacement mode.
EGT required too.

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Old 04-02-2012, 08:30 AM   #29
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Actic Travller.. Thanks for the input.. I agree with you on handling the Fleming.. Even my wife handling her (Which I want her to do as well and she is gunho about it) Is one reason why I like the Fleming.

You have a great point on the power plants. My main speed I would like to run is between 8 to 10 knots, but as we all know there will be times, one will need to hit flank speed to out run bad weather. I put the Man v12 in because that is the standard power plant. I have the options of these power plants as well.

Man V8 1200, Man V8 1000. Man 800. I really have not broken down which one best for me as of yet but I will.. I have looked at all the spec of them, but really have not got down to the brass tax as of yet. The V12 may not be the best in the long run. Time will tell that. Any thought you or any others may have on the power plants is always welcome. I am not a big fan on the Man power plants. I do know my way around diesels. Maintaining my power plants is alway high on my list. They are your main life line on your vessel as we all know.

Again Thanks for your input.
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Old 04-02-2012, 08:43 AM   #30
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F.F.. With you on all 3 points.. They are a must in my book. The CCP controlable pitch prop is included. I am also with you on demanding the items I want. As you said. Who is writting the check! Also this is one reason why I am here on this site. To get the input from people like you and others on those items. Walking in with a clear view of what you want is always the best way to go.

Thanks for the input.
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Old 04-02-2012, 08:57 AM   #31
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Ksanders.. Again great input... I have looked at a few sewage systems, but really have not found one yet that I like... I will look at the Raritan system... I like the fact that you said " We have used sewage treatment systems on our boats for many years with no issues.".. I believe fresh water is the way to go for the heads and other things to. And Yes. I will have a water maker system onboard... I'm looking at a ECH20 Tec system. Any thought on that system?

Thanks
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Old 04-02-2012, 10:27 AM   #32
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Ksanders.. Again great input... I have looked at a few sewage systems, but really have not found one yet that I like... I will look at the Raritan system... I like the fact that you said " We have used sewage treatment systems on our boats for many years with no issues.".. I believe fresh water is the way to go for the heads and other things to. And Yes. I will have a water maker system onboard... I'm looking at a ECH20 Tec system. Any thought on that system?

Thanks
Sorry I have little experience with watermakers of the size you need on that large boat. We run a Katadyn 160 GPD on our 47 footer.
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Old 04-02-2012, 10:37 AM   #33
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Thanks Ksanders.. Tell me. How has your Katadyn system held up? What (if any) things have you had to replace and so forth? Just getting some ideas.. Thanks
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Old 04-02-2012, 10:43 AM   #34
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Thanks Ksanders.. Tell me. How has your Katadyn system held up? What (if any) things have you had to replace and so forth? Just getting some ideas.. Thanks
The katadyn was added as part of a major refit and repower this last winter. Its only been test run at this point. I'll be heading to the boat to start our Alaskan trip in a couple of weeks and will be using it daily much of the summer, but for now I'm crossing my fingers and hoping for the best.
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Old 04-02-2012, 11:33 AM   #35
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That is cool Ksanders.. Sounds like it will be a wonderful trip and I wish you the best.. I will keep my fingers crossed as well for you. Please keep me posted on your trip when you start it. I know my wife wants to take a trip up to Alaska when we get our Vessel and so do I as well.. But until then, we can live through you on that trip my Friend.. LOL

Thanks
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Old 04-02-2012, 11:54 AM   #36
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Hello hfoster... happy soon to be Fleming owner!

Looking at performance curves of F75-78 w/ twin 1550 HP Cats. http://www.flemingyachts.com/75peformance.html Lots of speed-levels and range-room for you to play with. Also, Fleming should be able to tuck some additional fuel tank gallons into the boat design too, if you desire.

IMHO, seeing as you apparently plan plenty of wide ocean cruising during your 30 + years of oncoming boating adventures... you may need to outrun only one real bad and sudden ocean storm in your boating life, and that run may take flank speed 22 + knots for hours on end to get clear, but... that one WOT fast-run may be fully needed to keep you and wife and companions alive to see another day! I dig power being available to hit elevated speeds whenever required. So far Ive only needed to WOT our Tolly into the 22 + knot range three times, and for pretty short bursts, but it was needed and well worth the availability. We can lackadaisically piddle along at hull speed 7 knots for long range and fun sightseeing, or we can cruise at 16 to 17 knots to make some time, or we can go WOT to get clear if needed... but with ample enough power and hull design we have the choice, and I like it!

Side Note: Weve found at just below hull speed for our 34 Tolly (at 6.5 to 7 Knots), using only one screw at a time, our GPH drops considerably which increases range by some 20% to 25%. What can Fleming give you for stats on that type of 1550 HP Cat power train usage? Hull speed calcs to 11.5 +/- Knots for F75-78. In one post you mentioned 10 knots. Single screw operation might give you a whole new set of added range stats to dwell upon!

Get It On! Enjoy the heck out of boating life and keep TF up on your adventures. Cheers! - Art
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Old 04-02-2012, 12:11 PM   #37
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You need to go to a Trawler Fest and compare. Fleming is not technically a trawler.

If you looking at long range, 2500+ miles might want to look at a full displacement single screw which also would make a great live aboard and anchor out. Try to stay under 60 ft as moorage for a larger boat can to limited and expensive. To get the range a 50+ ft will be need for fuel, stability and weight. Also try top stay under 50 tons as many marinas do not have the lift capacity. Having large fuel tanks can be more of a big negative then a positive as the new diesel does not last as long, and then there is water/moisture/algae/bugs/tarring to contend with.

There are plenty of used boats for sale, so you might want to look at used as they are usually well equipped and deck out. I would never ever buy a new boat as they have just as much problems as used boat.
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Old 04-02-2012, 12:40 PM   #38
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Art. I like your detailed input.. From want I have read and with my chats with Burring yachts. The F-78 can run at 8 knots buring about 4 to 5 USGPH.. I'm thinking that is a bit low of a fuel burn with 2, V12 1550.. May be in a perfect world yes. But in th ereal world... MMMM Don't know. Looking at the fuel spec it's looks to me like it reads 8 knots they will burn 5 to 6 USGPH.. Again... I'm not 100% sold on that... Sea trials will tell it all that is for sure... As far and only running on 1 screw? Yes I can.. They said you need to cut the ruder 5 degrees and she will run true... But they also said... there is no need for this do to the hull design... Again not sold on that one.. I have ran twin screws on older vessels and the fuel rate with running only 1 screw dose improve your USGPH.. So it is always something to think about if needed.


With the V12 1550 the flank speed is around 20 knots.. Which I like, if there is a need for it. 17 or 18 knots may be just fine as well.. but you always like to know you have those 3 or so extra knots if needed...

As far as fuel tanks... Yes I can up grade them.. I believe that max is 4,000 USG with out really cutting into other things that are needed.

The Spec. On the hull... Yes I have looked at them but I really not broken them down to compare them with the other power plants they have to offer. That is on my check list to do with some friend that really knows Hull speeds and the alike.. I know some of it but not all of it. So it's best to go to the outsiders that really know it.

I thank you for your input Art... It's always best to kick things around to come up with the Vessel you need.
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Old 04-02-2012, 12:59 PM   #39
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Phil Fill.. Thanks for your input... Yes a Fleming is a semi displacement hull. So yes not a true Trawler.. I have been to trawler fest more then once... I have spent a year just shopping around and testing vessels.. Every Vessel has it pro's and con's. But the trick here is.. To get the Vessel to fit you.. Not you fitting the vessel.
I do agree with you a used Vessel can be the way to go sometimes. New Vessel has there bugs just like older ones. So it is a tade off, new vs old.. But for me I would want a vessel built to my spec that way I can be apart of every inch of her and know for sure what I have.

On the tonage and fuel... You do have a point and it is something to think about... But there we are talking about hit and miss on marinas and so forth... so one does need to plan ahead but isn't that with everything?

Thanks again for your input I like the way you think on some things.
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Old 04-02-2012, 02:07 PM   #40
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[QUOTE=ksanders; I'll be heading to the boat to start our Alaskan trip in a couple of weeks and will be using it daily much of the summer, but for now I'm crossing my fingers and hoping for the best.[/QUOTE]

Alaskan waters have a large amount of glacial silt that causes havoc with watermaker's, the filters in particular. In addition, because it's so cold the total GPH can be drastically reduced. The good news is that potable water is available almost everywhere. In the ten years we have had our boat in Alaska, I have never needed to start up our watermaker. We hold 400gals, and even on a week long charter, we have never run out. If you do feel the need to run your watermaker, try to do it when your in open waters, far from the outlet of glacially fed streams or bays.......Arctic Traveller
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