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Old 07-12-2016, 09:14 AM   #41
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Oh no Art.....everytimne I talk about fuel economy about being important, the hordes emerge and say how insignificant the cost of fuel is in boat ownership....

I am not letting you slip one by.....
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Old 07-12-2016, 09:36 AM   #42
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Oh no Art.....everytimne I talk about fuel economy about being important, the hordes emerge and say how insignificant the cost of fuel is in boat ownership....

I am not letting you slip one by.....
Fairly insignificant if boat owner only does 25 to 50 hrs. annual speed fest!

If boat owner does 50 hrs. use: At 1/2 nmpg doing 25 knots = 50 gal per hr. X 50 hrs. annual use = 2,500 gals X $3.00 per gal = $7,500 annual fuel bill. From there on fuel gets to be a real significant cost toward annual boat ownership.

If boat owner does 250 hrs use: At 3 nmpg doing 6 knots = 2 gal per hr. X 250 hrs. annual use = 500 gals X $3.00 per gal = $1,500 annual fuel bill.

Now that is a fairly insignificant fuel cost with some hours enjoyment cruising and actually seeing things as you pass by...in comparison to boat ownership total annual cost.
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Old 07-12-2016, 09:39 AM   #43
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Old 07-12-2016, 11:39 AM   #44
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I saw a mainship 40 at the jersey shore on craig's list for 18K geeze

I like the Cape Dory boats too!

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Old 07-12-2016, 12:25 PM   #45
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If you're interested in low fuel burn and considering planing boats or nearly so (many trawlers are) you'd be best off finding one that is light like an old plywood boat and w a small engine. Some of those boats are more fuel efficient than lots of the heavy trawlers at trawler speeds. Narrow helps too.
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Old 07-12-2016, 12:43 PM   #46
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Thanks for the suggestion Willy, but, because I'm wooden boat lover I don't want one. I like mid range speed But don't need it. the pocket size boats seem just right for my dreams of 3/4 time live aboard
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Old 07-12-2016, 12:52 PM   #47
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Thanks for the suggestion Willy, but, because I'm wooden boat lover I don't want one. I like mid range speed But don't need it. the pocket size boats seem just right for my dreams of 3/4 time live aboard
That said: I recommend an older wooden Chris Craft, Owens, Trojan, Egg Harbor... etc... somewhere in the 28 to 36' range. There are some really nice, inexpensive, classic (not necessary old enough to be antique - but, that too could work) wood ones out there; ya just gotta look deep!

I'll tell you from experience. Originally well built old woodies amount to about 2X time, money, and effort - compared to old fiberglass.
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Old 07-12-2016, 01:28 PM   #48
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That said: I recommend an older wooden Chris Craft, Owens, Trojan, Egg Harbor... etc... somewhere in the 28 to 36' range. There are some really nice, inexpensive, classic (not necessary old enough to be antique - but, that too could work) wood ones out there; ya just gotta look deep!

I'll tell you from experience. Originally well built old woodies amount to about 2X time, money, and effort - compared to old fiberglass.
ARRRRG!
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Old 07-12-2016, 03:19 PM   #49
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ARRRRG!
Didn't mean to rankle you. enjoy your boat search and eventual fun boating days.
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Old 07-12-2016, 07:14 PM   #50
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I have an 83' 1942 wood boat. It's all in what you want. Twin screws makes docking easier and gives you reliability in duplication. Diesel is cheaper than gas in the long run and probably in the short run, too.
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Old 07-12-2016, 08:01 PM   #51
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I have an 83' 1942 wood boat. It's all in what you want. Twin screws makes docking easier and gives you reliability in duplication. Diesel is cheaper than gas in the long run and probably in the short run, too.
Would love to see photos! Please...
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Old 07-12-2016, 08:27 PM   #52
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I have an 83' 1942 wood boat. It's all in what you want. Twin screws makes docking easier and gives you reliability in duplication. Diesel is cheaper than gas in the long run and probably in the short run, too.
Blessings upon you sir!
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Old 07-19-2016, 09:26 AM   #53
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older trawlers

I purchased a 1983 30' Tung Hwa clipper in 2011. It is a Taiwan sedan style boat built at the Lien Hwa boat yard. I'm not sure if that boat yard produced boats with better materials??? but It has teak decks, PO replaced fly bridge teak with fiberglass, original tanks (no outside/top rust), fiberglass hull that is extremely thick.... Decks are surprisingly solid after 30 years. I've owned the boat for 5 years and found that it's not practical to chase problems on these boats. I fix things as they come and maintain her very well. I do not treat her as an investment.... I treat her as a tool, a vehicle to experience family memories. I don't expect to get what I paid for her when I let her go (although I'd get more right now). I'm perfectly willing to donate her, if necessary, once I use her all up and get every last positive memory from her.... Kinda like a car. With that said, I did get the boat under covered moorage to minimize potential water intrusion. It's been operating wonderfully for 30+ years..... I have no doubt It'll be around for decades longer. My family has been so blessed with the performance of this boat and its Lehman engine, which has never let me down. We take it all over the San Juan islands and the Canadian Gulf islands. The NW has been a wonderful experience boating.

If you go into a TT with the knowledge of what to look for, the proper expectations, you can get one sized right and close to your price range. Just don't be the person to replace everything, financially dumping your retirement for the next boater to enjoy... Ideally you'll find a boat that some other poor soul did the work for you, spent their own money to "get it right". It's a $30K boat after all, a memory maker, not an investment. Good luck!
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Old 07-19-2016, 10:11 AM   #54
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I purchased a 1983 30' Tung Hwa clipper in 2011. It is a Taiwan sedan style boat built at the Lien Hwa boat yard. I'm not sure if that boat yard produced boats with better materials??? but It has teak decks, PO replaced fly bridge teak with fiberglass, original tanks (no outside/top rust), fiberglass hull that is extremely thick.... Decks are surprisingly solid after 30 years. I've owned the boat for 5 years and found that it's not practical to chase problems on these boats. I fix things as they come and maintain her very well. I do not treat her as an investment.... I treat her as a tool, a vehicle to experience family memories. I don't expect to get what I paid for her when I let her go (although I'd get more right now). I'm perfectly willing to donate her, if necessary, once I use her all up and get every last positive memory from her.... Kinda like a car. With that said, I did get the boat under covered moorage to minimize potential water intrusion. It's been operating wonderfully for 30+ years..... I have no doubt It'll be around for decades longer. My family has been so blessed with the performance of this boat and its Lehman engine, which has never let me down. We take it all over the San Juan islands and the Canadian Gulf islands. The NW has been a wonderful experience boating.

If you go into a TT with the knowledge of what to look for, the proper expectations, you can get one sized right and close to your price range. Just don't be the person to replace everything, financially dumping your retirement for the next boater to enjoy... Ideally you'll find a boat that some other poor soul did the work for you, spent their own money to "get it right". It's a $30K boat after all, a memory maker, not an investment. Good luck!

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Old 03-15-2017, 12:07 PM   #55
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Denise,

Belated response and others already provided good answers. I can add the following:

1. Absolutely! Trawlers are one of life's better inventions. Older trawlers are indeed a bargain, provided you both can and enjoy working on the boat. Its an ongoing thing.

2. Although hard because many older boats had multiple owners, it's crucial to buy from a knowledgeable-not-afraid-to-spend-a-buck previous owner. A written history log is a good hint, as is a compliment of spares, labels and general care in previous work.

3. You're right on with a single engine. This allows you boat size as big as you can go. Like a sailboat, a longer trawler will go faster/smoother but with (almost) no extra cost (sail area, crew size, fuel) besides dock space. Meaning, if you make the labor effort, you should maximize the gain.

4. The original construction is not as important as how the boat survived till today. Is it sound? overbuilt? There are enough solid FG hull construction trawlers on the market to warrant favoring them.

5. Surveys are nice. but four years later I'm still finding stuff even the best surveyor couldn't possibly find in four hours. Take your time, enjoy the search; be ready to pass even if the price is enticing and nearby. Then, be brave and trust your senses. You seem quite capable.
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