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Old 10-25-2013, 12:46 PM   #21
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Do not under any circumstance use a surveyor who has not performed many surveys of metal boats and can prove it, no matter how many 4-day ABYC courses the guy has bought. Remember, those courses are sold to teach ABYC standards and vocabulary, no prior experience or knowledge is required.
Not bad advice but choosing between two apparently competent people I think I'd lean towards the one who has committed to his profession by investing time and money in continuing education.

It seems the people that do not invest in education don't have to because they think they already know everything. These types tend to have one years experience repeated twenty times rather than twenty years experience.
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Old 10-25-2013, 02:01 PM   #22
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Prior experience and knowledge is required. Any "education" that is delivered in a few days to people who are not required to have a solid grounding in the field can be nothing more than a marketing exercise.

There are many legitimate technical schools that provide good training and education to a recognized professional standard. The short courses are offered only to those with a documented level of professional certification in the area of study.

Find a surveyor who can show a similar background to the those for whom the following courses and job descriptions apply.

Marine engineering 1 - management level

CURRICULUM - Calhoon MEBA Engineering School

Marine Electrician III
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Old 10-25-2013, 02:08 PM   #23
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From Marine Electrician III

"- A minimum of 7 years of U.S. Navy surface ship electrical system repairs, testing and troubleshooting experience; experience working with Navy cargo/weapons elevators is preferred but not mandatory. - "


Don't see many Grand Banks with weapons elevators
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Old 10-25-2013, 02:10 PM   #24
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If that is all you got out of that then my point is made, thank you.
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Old 10-25-2013, 08:56 PM   #25
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If that is all you got out of that then my point is made, thank you.
Thanks for the laugh, you never disappoint
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Old 10-25-2013, 10:00 PM   #26
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I have owned a Burger with an aluminum hull for 8 years. It was built in 1965.
I installed a galvanic isolater and isolation transformer. Expensive. But worth it. I have had zero problems with electrolisys. If you do a survey have an audio gauge done, to check plate thickness.
Any older boat is almost always going to need complete rewiring and replumbing if you want to avoid gremlins. It gets very expensive.
You could do it yourself of course.
There was some interior corrosion i found, mostly in inaccessible locations. As with any boat, build quality is the main criterion. I love my Burger. Its built like a tank.
When the neighbor's Hatteras is bobbing up and down from harbour wake, the Burger is barely moving.
But if you have a normal budget you will be happier with a big Hatteras or a newer plastic boat.
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Old 10-25-2013, 11:21 PM   #27
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I have owned a Burger with an aluminum hull for 8 years. It was built in 1965.
I installed a galvanic isolater and isolation transformer. Expensive. But worth it. I have had zero problems with electrolisys. If you do a survey have an audio gauge done, to check plate thickness.
Any older boat is almost always going to need complete rewiring and replumbing if you want to avoid gremlins. It gets very expensive.
You could do it yourself of course.
There was some interior corrosion i found, mostly in inaccessible locations. As with any boat, build quality is the main criterion. I love my Burger. Its built like a tank.
When the neighbor's Hatteras is bobbing up and down from harbour wake, the Burger is barely moving.
But if you have a normal budget you will be happier with a big Hatteras or a newer plastic boat.
Welcome aboard Itwasnt!

I read yours as the best most verifiable post on this thread. Years of responsible ownership experience is paramount to really understanding any type material’s actions and reactions on a boat. Also, your input regarding cost per boat type as well as for repairs on an older boat seem right on the money – pun intended!

Happy Boating Daze! - Art

PS: How long is your 65 Burger... picts to share?? – Thanks!
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Old 10-26-2013, 02:59 PM   #28
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Its 74' with the cockpit extension.
I have photos on www.dyevushka.com
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Old 10-27-2013, 01:40 PM   #29
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Would steel be a better choice in something of from this vintage, all things being equal?
I had a 65ft steel Burger that was 35 years old. It was a maintenance nightmare. Its design wasn't right, had teak decks (no steel plate) and there's little chance a steel boat 3 decades old has been maintained continuously and properly.

Personally I would only go for steel for a new or self-build. But for a multi-decade old hull would avoid it or be extremely careful getting into it in the first place.

Just my opinion.
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Old 10-27-2013, 01:56 PM   #30
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Its 74' with the cockpit extension.
I have photos on Our Journeys
TY - Nice picts! Nice boat!!
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Old 10-27-2013, 04:13 PM   #31
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This boat is steel .......... FG covered. In our yard a while back.

Never heard of such a thing but talked to the owner.

I would think the expansion rates of steel and FG with the sun on it would be so different that the FG would pop off from sheer strength failure. How could it possibly adhere?
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Old 10-27-2013, 04:22 PM   #32
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This boat is steel .......... FG covered. In our yard a while back.

Never heard of such a thing but talked to the owner.

I would think the expansion rates of steel and FG with the sun on it would be so different that the FG would pop off from sheer strength failure. How could it possibly adhere?
Damn nice looking craft design! TY for sharen... I'd love to learn about steel hull coated in FRP. What did the owner say re expansion rates? Is it just gel coat?? Steel and FRP combined weight must be enormous???

Trapped water would rust like crazy - wouldn't it?
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Old 10-27-2013, 07:27 PM   #33
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How could it possibly adhere?
It adheres quite well. Virtually every steel or aluminum yacht hull (of the size that rates yacht class finishing) is faired with epoxy. Every aluminum hull yacht (of the same description) has its bottom coated with multiple barrier coats of epoxy. Aluminum and steel superstructures are faired with epoxy material.

Adding glass to the mix seems like a waste of time, material, and cash but to each his own I guess.

Reaching back a couple of posts, aluminum hulls generally fare (no pun intended) than steel over the years. I see a lot more wastage of steel from poor maintenance than aluminum. A poor man can keep an aluminum boat in good shape far longer than he can keep a steel boat.
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