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Old 03-21-2016, 01:25 PM   #161
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Mako - Fantasizing aside, what sets your engine choices aside from other builders ... Asking or demanding a NA or builder to circumvent EU, Canadian, and US environmental regulations seems risky and odd... As alluded previously, what are the real issues that preclude installing a current engine?
If EPA had a legal exemption then I would definitely install a mechanical engine over an electronic one. However, as I mentioned earlier in this post, despite my repeated attempts, I do not qualify for an exemption so I have concluded that a T3 will be installed.

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BTW I have read and been told by builders that metal hulls are much less susceptible to lightning issues - true or false?
As an engineer it's my understanding that the hull acts as a giant faraday cage. Adding a lightning arrestor to the top of the mast would help the situation even more. As THD commented, the ECM is further protected and most failures are the sensors themselves.

Perhaps the situation isn't so dire as we "traditionalists" would tend to believe???
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Old 03-21-2016, 03:47 PM   #162
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Mako-I think you are right on the faraday cage idea for metal hulls. One lightning "expert" I read, a prof at the U of Fla, advocated putting 3-4 metal plates along the waterline down both sides of a boat, connected to the bonding system, to create a sort of faraday cage. I would assume the same theory holds for a metal hull.
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Old 03-21-2016, 06:05 PM   #163
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Since my previous post comparing old automobile engines to newer ones apparently went over the head of some folks, I'll make it simple and direct:

There have been a lot of improvements in manufacturing and engineering in the past fifty years or so. A new (current production) engine will have a longer life, be more fuel efficient, and be more reliable than an antique. And of course, when parts are needed, whether they be repair parts or maintenance parts, they are far more likely to be available. Some parts for old engines can only be obtained from old engines that have been scrapped for parts. And, mechanics are more likely to have the tools and training to work on current model engines.


If you really believe a newer model engine is going to leave you stranded in the middle of the ocean, perhaps a sailboat would be a better choice.
Thumbs up. Good post!
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Old 03-21-2016, 06:06 PM   #164
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i can understand from reading this post about the concern with electronic engines vs manual engines. having worked in the oil fields around dirt work and drilling rigs i can tell you electronic engines run good till they break down then you have to wait for a service tech to show up days later to get looked at then if they didnt have the part had to wait on that. now on the other hand the mechanical engines we could get our mech. on it and wouldnt be down more than a couple days. and there still are a lot of 71-92 series detroits still working out there on drilling rigs and other equipment. just putting in my two cents from what i have exp. but to each to his own pref.
Well, I'll make sure I don't a boat with new engines to some inland oil field; thanks for the heads up!
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Old 03-21-2016, 07:14 PM   #165
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While speaking to a Beta dealer at the boat show this weekend replacement my 4-236's with new Betas. Depending which engine I went with (such as a new turbo 85 hp unit) I would have to destroy my old Perkins due to enviro regulations. This is how pernicious these regulations have become. A perfectly good re-buildable engine would have to be destroyed. How much pollution is created building new engines, electronics, computers etc. compared to what a lil' ole' Perkins puts out when freshened up.

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Old 03-22-2016, 12:15 AM   #166
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""Which of these have you tried to get parts from and found that they don't support their engines?"

VOLVO" FF

So just how old are these mythical engines that are no longer supported?

My personal experience, recently, 2014, with 1990 Volvo engines, is that parts are all available, if not today, from just behind the parts counter, or tomorrow, from the local warehouse, then within a few days, from some other warehouse here in North America, or if very major, from Sweden, just a couple of weeks shipment away. How is this different from any other engine?
I would never condemn a brand for such a fictional difficulty.
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Old 03-22-2016, 06:50 AM   #167
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I must admit, these newer engines are nice running and much more compact. I am wondering though if some of them might have the problems we're seeing with the newer road going diesels where there is huge carbon buildup in the egr circuit. This may not be such a problem on boats as they seem to be more of a constant rpm use. The worst automotive carbon buildup problems seem to be in colder climate vehicles. If the engine warms up and stays warm I think it has been less a problem.

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Old 03-22-2016, 06:55 AM   #168
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You have been pretty lucky , almost anything Volvo (a part not a filter or belt) has to be shipped at my expense from Atlanta.

Head gaskets , or just piston rings come from a Euro source

For old stuff that Volvo actually made , using a local dealer is fine , we give them the part numbers 2 weeks in advance and much is there when we go to opick it up.

A "Volvo" that was a French 4 cyl diesel car engine marinization , good luck.

Most times the car places can order parts for marinizers like Westerbeak items at 1/2 the cost and 1/2 the time.

The Fram cross reference book is invaluable at finding fuel and lube oil filters that are cross referenced , so can be located most anywhere.

ZF is in the same class as Volvo, tranny parts must be flown in at the customers expense , little is stocked.

"How is this different from any other engine?

DD has both local sources as well as local rebuilders .

Before a purchase , it is pretty simple to call the local engine folks and ask price and time to obtain a head gasket and an oversized piston and a set of rings for the contemplated purchase.

Days , weeks , months or "out of stock" NEVER could be the answer.
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Old 03-22-2016, 07:57 AM   #169
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So, FF, assuming for a moment that Volvo parts might take longer to obtain, the new are still easier than the old Volvo. And, you didn't address all the other solid brands I mentioned. MTU, CAT, MAN, Cummins, Northern Lights/Lugger, John Deere, Yanmar. They all support their products well and have no history of discontinuing carrying parts after release as you expressed as the problem. Those seven probably build around 97-98% of all new marine diesels sold today.
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Old 03-22-2016, 08:16 AM   #170
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Koliver

It would appear you are doomed. But help is on the Horizon, merely rip out your Volvos and install a couple of 6-71s.
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Old 04-01-2016, 02:47 PM   #171
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Electronically Controlled Engine

I inquired to the AGCO SISU technical department and received the following reply:

"The engine you have selected is a very robust engine designed to be reliable. Even if there was an electrical problem, the engine is designed to remain functional with limited performance, even if there was an issue with the electronics.

The most important thing to pay attention to, with modern Common Rail engines, is the injector sensitivity for dirt in fuel and the lubrication capacities of the fuel. With proper quality fuel, the engine you have purchased is going to serve you long and well.

I do not have a recommendation regarding stocking of parts on the 49 CTIM

If extreme caution is used, and there is no limitation regarding resource of stocking parts. The recommendation would be to stock a set of injectors, an ECU and a wiring harness.

Best regards"
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Old 04-01-2016, 06:42 PM   #172
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So if ECU is dead, engine will continue to run? I don't think that is what they meant by "electrical problem". Maybe some problems like out of range sensors.

Second that about good quality fuel and really good filtration. Common rail likes juice being clean. But I have seen some neglected run fine, and ones maintained well have trouble, so hard to pick out patterns.
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