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Old 08-14-2011, 09:37 AM   #21
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RE: Old Boats and Teak Decks

Our last sailboat here in the UK had teak in the cockpit sole and seats, but stuck down and no screws and it was fine after 21 years when we sold it. Replacing that small amount would have been an acceptable task and not urgent because no leaks.

Otherwise we went boat hunting in the USA and 'no teak decks' was a premium. Many of the Defevers we looked at had no teak because it had been removed or in some cases on later models was never there, big plus point and mostly these boats came at a price premium.

In the end we bought a Tradewinds CPMY with teak decks on the sundeck but nowhere else and never had been. The teak on the sundeck is fine as it is completely covered by a hardtop and sidesceens so not hit by UV or water. In our case it came 'varnished' with Cetol which is acceptable since it is in effect an indoor surface and it has been like that for many years so not subjected to damage from over enthusiastic scrubbing or sanding and the plugs and caulking are in first class condition. We have a separate aft cockpit (no teak) for line handling, boarding and fishing from. This is as far as I would go unless I was buying new and expected to sell before the teak became a price issue, say after10 years.

I still like the look of nice teak decks, just not for me and the age of boats in my price range.
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Old 08-14-2011, 06:50 PM   #22
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RE: Old Boats and Teak Decks

Quote:
Tony B wrote:
Question:

How difficult is it for the 'untrained' person to feel a spongy deck under the teak while the teak is still on the deck?
Not difficult at all, you will feel it underfoot.

Knowing how much damage there is under there is a different story though.We started with a one square foot of spongy deck near the foot winch and ended up taking up the*teak ,cutting out the the entire *deck, removing the core, replacing with*Kledersel, reglassing in the old deck, faring in in preperation for guess what, a new Teak deck.

As Marin said though, you don't screw new decks down these days and that is the key thing.
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Old 09-06-2011, 10:17 AM   #23
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RE: Old Boats and Teak Decks

I looked at all your photos. What did you do to replace the teak, or did you. Did I miss some pictures possibly?

Peter
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Old 09-06-2011, 10:19 AM   #24
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RE: Old Boats and Teak Decks

Tony, is there a adhesive out there that will hold on to teak?

peter
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Old 09-06-2011, 10:33 AM   #25
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RE: Old Boats and Teak Decks

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sunvale1 wrote:
Tony, is there a adhesive out there that will hold on to teak?

peter
I would call Teak Decking Systems in Florida and ask them what builders like Grand Banks, Fleming, etc. are using these days.* They are the prime supplier of teak decks and adhesives/sealants today.
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Old 09-06-2011, 10:54 AM   #26
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RE: Old Boats and Teak Decks

As an Ex sub contractor for T.D.S. or as it became known to us as tedius, back in the late 90s, they were experimenting with all kinds of caulk, what they came up with and now put there own label on the tubes is the black silicone used on the Fla. highways for exspantion joints. Check it out ,its about $2.00 a tube. The most important part of a reseam is CLEAN, you must get the seams dry and Clean. I have reseamed miles of decks on cruise ships and yachts. We also used a tape on the bottom of the seam so the caulk would not stick to the bottom and only the sides of the boards, this would allow for more exspantion,contraction and flex. BB
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Old 09-06-2011, 11:58 AM   #27
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RE: Old Boats and Teak Decks

In the Seattle area we are finally having some hot/warm summer weather, 70 to 80 degrees, so the teak decks are starting to dry out and shrink, which is the time to check and repair a teak deck.* A teak deck will shrink which causes the caulking to pull a way from the teak boards and can cause fasteners to loosen.*
*
The first thing I do is wash the teak deck on my hands and knees looking for where the caulking has pulled away from the teak and looking for bungs that have popped up.* As the deck dries I also look for the seams that remain wet after the rest of the deck has dried, which indicated water/moisture.* Note the areas and let the deck complete dry out.* If the deck is sound there should be no or very few areas.
*
The bungs/fasteners should be replaced before replacing caulking to get the deck back down and secured.* Drill out the old bung, with a carpenters knife cut out what remains and the slot in the screw.* If the screw does not back out, which most fasteners that have failed do not, getting the old screw out can be a problem.* I use an electrician screw driver that has a slotted blade that expands and grabs the screw.* They are sold a electric supply stores.* A longer or bigger size screw will probable have to be used, or you could fill the old hole with epoxy and re drill/tap.* ***
*
While the fasteners are being fixed/replaced, cut/strip out the old caulking with a carpet knife and then ream out the remaining with a square head screw driver.* If the calking has failed this does not take much effort and/or time. When completely dry, tape along the seam, and applied new caulking.* I use Boat Life teak dick caulking.* Remove the tape before the caulking dries.* ****
*

Each year I apply a coat of Daleys Sea Fin Teak sealer which is thin so it soaks and gets down into the tiny cracks and dries hard, which seal the tiniest cracks.
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Old 09-06-2011, 01:17 PM   #28
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Old Boats and Teak Decks

Great post BB

Marin,* Why'd you have to pour water on me. I had heard that Life Caulk was specially made to adhere to teak so I was about to get some (thinking if it could adhere to teak it could adhere to anything) and then you say it's garbage. But when one hears that sort of thing about a product that's been around for decades and been prominent on the market one tends to consider it BS but I'll pass on the Life Caulk (considering your good judgement) and try this Tedius/TDS stuff. My need for a new caulk is'nt great as 5200 and SikaFlex (although not perfect) do a very good job for me.

I've recently been going old tech w Dolfinite and as a sealer/bedding compound I'm inclined to give it high marks. Found some old stuff on my boat that I suspect was put there by Willard and had lasted for over 35 yrs. I really like the (easy to take up and re-do) feature. It's very user friendly. It's not for typical seams but as a bedding I'm sold.

Phil Phill,** Sounds like you've got decking down pat however I'm surprised you have good experience w Dalys Sea Finn Teak Oil. I used it on Willy's cap rail and it did dry rather hard and over the winter there was much black on the cap rail. We sanded it all off and started using my own mix of oil. The Dalys was the last of several over the counter products we used. My oil is 15% raw linseed oil, 15% Olympic Wood Preservative, 60% turpentine and a bit of Kerosene. On a SE Alaska hot day it does get a bit sticky but most of the time one can sit on the cap rail. I feel no inclination to try something new.


-- Edited by nomadwilly on Tuesday 6th of September 2011 01:29:47 PM
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Old 09-06-2011, 01:30 PM   #29
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Old Boats and Teak Decks

Quote:
nomadwilly wrote:but I'll pass on the Life Caulk (considering your good judgement) and try this Tedius/TDS stuff. My need for a new caulk is'nt great as 5200 and SikaFlex (although not perfect) do a very good job for me.
*
*Eric--- TDS is intended for sealing the seams in teak decks. It's not a substitute for 4200, 5200, Sikaflex, etc., etc., etc.* If you have a teak deck and need to reseam the grooves, TDS is the stuff to use.* If you are going to bed hardware, seal up window frames, etc. TDS is not what you want.

My comment on LifeCaulk is based on seeing how it works (it doesn't) as a seam-sealer on a teak deck.* It may be great for other uses, but in my experience and observation it's pretty* much worthless as a teak deak seam material.

In any event, the only thing I use Lifecaulk for anymore is dipping the tips of deck screws in before inserting them in the holes in the planks.* For all our other sealant/bedding needs on the boat we use Sikaflex, Dolfinite, and occasionally 4200. And if we want something to stay where it is and don't anticipate ever having to remove it we use 5200.* The one thing we DON'T use is silicone.


-- Edited by Marin on Tuesday 6th of September 2011 01:31:58 PM
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Old 09-06-2011, 02:45 PM   #30
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RE: Old Boats and Teak Decks

that is what I wanted to see, somebody tell it like it's supposed to be told. I can't stand the looks of a polished or varnished Teak deck.

Thanks

Peter
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Old 09-06-2011, 03:48 PM   #31
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RE: Old Boats and Teak Decks

Quote:
Marin wrote:* The one thing we DON'T use is silicone.
I will second, third and fourth that. Someone (builder or a previous owner) went crazy on our boat with silicone caulking around everything. It doesn't hold, it mildews like crazy and its a bear to remove. I think that I have about ten years worth of work ahead of me (if I or the boat last that long) to remove this awful stuff and replace it with something better.
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Old 09-06-2011, 05:18 PM   #32
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RE: Old Boats and Teak Decks

I can second the fact that a well maintained deck will last for years. I just had a survey done on my 'new to me' 83 Tung Hwa Trawler and her decks are solid after years of uncovered moorage (20 of them in San Diego/8 in Pacific Northwest). Of course, the old owner replaced bungs and screws (thicker/shorter) any chance he got. Now I have her undercover in LaConner where I hope to get many more years of service out of them.
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