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Old 04-04-2015, 11:49 PM   #1
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OK let's see...

We've cussed and discussed anchors and coolers and even opined about our drug of choice.

Boating season is still a ways off for many so how about another thread to while away the days until you back-easters can hit the water?

Tell us about your absolute worst day on the water. It might have been scary or made you seasick or just turned out to be a crappy day.

But let's hear about it.

Oh and leave out the blood and guts stuff so nobody gets sick. But let's hear the rest of it. And pictures would be great!
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Old 04-04-2015, 11:59 PM   #2
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Back in my sailboat days, I got caught in a storm outside in the Atlantic. WOW! My boat was 30 feet and the waves looked bigger. There was rain, sideways of course, and 40 -50 Knt winds. My kids were screaming, my knuckles were white. We had to call the USCG, because my engine crapped out. After all is said and done, at least I was out there and the very next weekend, we were out there again. Not in the Ocean, but we were out there. So, maybe it wasn't that bad?
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Old 04-05-2015, 12:55 AM   #3
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24+ hours spent hove to in 20'+ seas 500 miles from the nearest dirt , it was part of a 7 day passage.
I dont want to do that again.
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Old 04-05-2015, 01:05 AM   #4
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Ever taken water over the flight deck of a Nimitz class Carrier? It ain't no party!
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Old 04-05-2015, 01:33 AM   #5
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Sea kayaking days, a tad north of BC's Cape Caution, landing through surf...the size of which is really hard to judge from seaward.

Our method was for me to go in first, then watch the waves from the beach and hold my paddle overhead parallel to the beach as a sign to my wife that it was safe to come in on a small wave.

I went in first on a beautiful wave about 5' high and rode it an insane distance up the beach. It was such an amazing experience that as soon as the wave disappeared from under me I jumped up, held my paddle high in the air, and gave my best hairy chested bellowing roar.

My wife, seeing my paddle go up, started paddling hard to catch the next wave. It was a beast. She ended up broaching and going upside down in the surf with a fully loaded expedition kayak. My heart stopped. This was before GPS or satellite phones and all we had were handheld line of sight marine radios.

She was soaked, but okay. I kept shaking for quite a while.
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Old 04-05-2015, 02:46 AM   #6
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Ok

When I was doing my first inside passage trip in 2003

I had a 34' bayliner.

2 whole years of boating under my keel

Listened to the Canadian weather forecast in Prince Rupertert BC calling for 3-5' seas.

Heading out for Ketchikan

Then realizing too late to turn around that the Canadians use metric
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Old 04-05-2015, 07:00 AM   #7
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Worst and Best in one. When I was about 15, we witnessed from our dock on the lake a horrific accident between two boats. One was spinning, the other flipped and people and equipment tossed everywhere. What was eerie was seeing it happen and then hearing the sound slightly delayed but the moment we saw them about to hit we ran to the boat and took off toward them.

We started collecting people as did two other boats, taking them all to our dock as we were closest plus we were closest to medical care if needed.

We thought we had them all collected and on shore. Others then dealt with pulling the boats to shore. However, a few minutes later there was an outcry for a man named Homer Fike. Everyone was searching. Fortunately that was resolved shortly thereafter when my cousin returned. Turns out Homer was quite cold from the swim so my cousin had taken him back to their home already. Ironic that while everyone there is panicked over Homer, he's back home changed into warm dry clothing and relaxing.

But happy ending as a horrific looking wreck and no one injured. Oh and in the two boats there were 17 passengers total.
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Old 04-05-2015, 07:04 AM   #8
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I don't know how I forgot this one but also turned out no one hurt, just two boats destroyed. Two of us were skiing one day behind a friend's boat. Suddenly we saw a boat not paying attention and headed straight toward the boat from the side. Easy to see what was developing from 75' behind but not so easy when in the boat. We tried to yell, to no avail, so we just let go of the ski ropes. Seeing us do that got our tow boat occupants attention and so they slowed to come get us just as the two boats collided. They did slow enough to make the collision bow to bow from the side, but at least not mid boat. Both boats pretty well destroyed but no injuries.
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Old 04-05-2015, 10:03 AM   #9
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We call it our "Perfect Storm" trip.

Was Second captain on the "Seeker" (60' Harkers Island wood dive charter boat) diving the Andrea Doria (100 miles SE of Montauk Long Island, NY). We were 2 days into a 3 day trip when the light and variable forecast changed to Gale warnings and deteriorated to Storm warnings. Seas went from <2' swells to 4 to 6' in a few hours. During the peak of the storm 15 to 20' waves had us quartering into them. We struck a particularly nasty estimated 22' wave that stopped the radar. There is something indescribable about looking up to the top of a 22' wave when you're in a second story pilothouse. Wind fell out, fog rolled in, drove through Montauk inlet between the stone jetties with 20' visability. Something about seeing the jetties on radar while your in a cloud at 8am in the morning.

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Old 04-05-2015, 11:48 PM   #10
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Two come to my mind....

First was probably my scariest day on the water was when I was 14 or 15 years old. I was sailing on Lake Huron on my trusty Sailfish with my girlfriend. It was a beautiful sunny day with a nice breeze. We were about 1/2 mile or so from shore when the wind suddenly stopped. I looked up the lake and could see a band of dark clouds heading our direction. Lightening was rolling around inside the clouds and moving along the front of them and also at times coming down to the water.

I lowered the mast and tied that and the boom and sails to the boat then flipped the boat over so there wouldn't be any metal on top. My GF and I got in the water and tied ourselves together and to the boat. (Hmmmm was that my first experience with bondage????) We were at the end of about a 15' line and pushed away from the boat.

The storm hit with the full fury of a Lake Huron storm. The waves were crashing over us (yes we did have our life belts on) and the winds howled and we were getting pelted by the rain and the blown spray off the waves.

The storm only lasted about 15-20 minutes and after it let up we righted the boat and stepped the mast and sailed back to shore.

Needless to say we got our butts chewed for being out in the storm but at the same time got hugged for making it safely back to shore.

The other when I was in high school with a friend and his parents on their ~32' Mathews coming across the north end of Lake Huron from the North Channel back to MI. His dad was a doctor and had to be back to work in a couple of days. We made the crossing by ourselves and with 20/20 hindsight it was a VERY stoopid decision.

We were out in the middle of the lake up on the bridge of the boat and when we were in the troughs we could not see above the wave tops. We tucked in behind a freighter that was headed up the lake but couldn't keep up with him.

I guess I was too stoopid to know how much danger we were in but looking back on that trip now--we were absolutely nuts to venture out there alone.
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Old 04-06-2015, 01:07 AM   #11
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That girlfriend was an awfully good sport. Most of the girls I took sailing in my younger days would have screamed, cried, or beaten me senseless with a winch handle if I got them in that situation.
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Old 04-06-2015, 11:37 AM   #12
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Quote:
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Ever taken water over the flight deck of a Nimitz class Carrier? It ain't no party!
Been steaming in formation in a DDG with said class carrier. Agree, not the best day underway.
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Old 04-06-2015, 11:54 AM   #13
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Been steaming in formation in a DDG with said class carrier. Agree, not the best day underway.
I was on the JFK on its initial Caribbean cruise and went through a hurricane. I have no idea where the escorts went, we could not see them.
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Old 04-06-2015, 12:02 PM   #14
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They would spread the group around the carrier, WAY OUT. No one wanted the small boys anywhere close to the bird farm.
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Old 04-06-2015, 12:17 PM   #15
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Under those conditions, the Hanger Bay is packed tighter than a can of sardines!
And very few places to view the surrounding, unless your on the bridge. Escorts were taking a beating, and looked like the were submarines most of the time.
Realize that the Flight Deck is 90 or so feet off the water line, and the bridge is another 35-40 feet higher and 300 or so feet from the bow.
Don't miss those days at all!
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Old 04-06-2015, 12:31 PM   #16
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That girlfriend was an awfully good sport. Most of the girls I took sailing in my younger days would have screamed, cried, or beaten me senseless with a winch handle if I got them in that situation.
She was a VERY good sport and looked at it like it was an adventure. She was smart enough to realize how much danger we were really in but also was smart enough to know that we'd taken all the precautions we could.

We joked later about being tied together chest to chest. Of course we'd been in that same position many times before but never out in deep water.
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Old 04-06-2015, 12:34 PM   #17
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I believe there is a line in the song The Wreck of the Edmond Fitzgerald that states "When the waves turn the minutes to hours" This is very true statement.
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Old 04-06-2015, 01:32 PM   #18
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Back in 2009, I sailed my Hunter 41 from St-Vincent (Grenadines) to Cancun with a stop in Haiti. 6 miserable days of constant 11' seas beam reach. Took 3 days to get use to the motion, then another 3 of muscle pain... but we made it all the way to Cancun, then the engine transmission fail with a dismast the next day... (and that is another story....)
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Old 04-06-2015, 02:02 PM   #19
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She was a VERY good sport and looked at it like it was an adventure. She was smart enough to realize how much danger we were really in but also was smart enough to know that we'd taken all the precautions we could.

We joked later about being tied together chest to chest. Of course we'd been in that same position many times before but never out in deep water.
We wouldn't trade the roughest thing we ever went through for anything. Unfortunately, we can't discuss it openly, but it was a challenge few face and knowing that together we could and did and we were fully there for each other made everything that has come after easy. I'm sure on the experience you described you learned more about each other but also about the two of you together than you ever would have that same time period on a beach, relaxing.

People often ask would you change the tough times if you could go back. Our answer is emphatically "no" as they're part of what got us to where we are today. I recall an X-Files episode and have seen other shows where someone kept reliving a day starting from a specific moment. It never worked out very well doing so. We just take the days as they are or were and embrace them.
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Old 04-06-2015, 02:15 PM   #20
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Small local bay on New Year's Eve, anchored in some 30 feet of water at one end of the bay. Dead calm. Forecast front came through at 3am some six hour before it was forecast to arrive. Anchor dragged badly in the 40-something knot wind and 4 foot breaking waves sending us into a railroad trestle that ran across the bay. Only my wife's quick reaction is why BNSF locomotives don't have a little GB sillouette painted below their cab windows. This incident prompted us to change anchors and we have never had a dragging problem since.
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