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Old 09-23-2018, 11:53 AM   #1
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Oh Boy I am in Love

Found this while looking at boats for sale online.

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Old 09-23-2018, 12:18 PM   #2
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I've seen this yacht (I can't call it a boat) out in Lake Union. It is beautiful.
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Old 09-23-2018, 12:59 PM   #3
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A very nice piece of boating history there. Thanks for the video.
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Old 09-23-2018, 02:19 PM   #4
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Ah, wood boat disease... I have it, too!
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Old 09-23-2018, 02:28 PM   #5
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The price is only $200,000 ???? That seems like a lot of boat for that money.

https://www.irwinyachtsales.com/boat...ngton-6774743/
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Old 09-23-2018, 03:09 PM   #6
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I have a wood Egg Harbor 37 and it is a lot of maintenance. Most people wont want to be involved with wood and boats hence the lower price, but they like wood houses!

When boats were made by hand from wood, that took a lot of dedication and craftsmanship to make it right and to keep them going. And most of them are long gone, the boats and the craftsmanship of skilled wood boat workers. But people can learn new things, if they love wood, they will love wood boats too.
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Old 09-23-2018, 05:01 PM   #7
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Love our wood boat.
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Old 09-23-2018, 05:35 PM   #8
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I've seen this yacht (I can't call it a boat) out in Lake Union. It is beautiful.

Gorgeous boat, I would love to see it in the wild.
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Old 09-23-2018, 05:42 PM   #9
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A very nice piece of boating history there. Thanks for the video.

Anytime!
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Old 09-23-2018, 05:45 PM   #10
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Ah, wood boat disease... I have it, too!

One of the many diseases I have that cost me money.
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Old 09-23-2018, 05:59 PM   #11
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I have a wood Egg Harbor 37 and it is a lot of maintenance. Most people wont want to be involved with wood and boats hence the lower price, but they like wood houses!

When boats were made by hand from wood, that took a lot of dedication and craftsmanship to make it right and to keep them going. And most of them are long gone, the boats and the craftsmanship of skilled wood boat workers. But people can learn new things, if they love wood, they will love wood boats too.
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Love our wood boat.

Everyone says how much wooden boat coast to maintain but no one actually puts a price.

2000k a month? 1000k a month? We still have wooden boat guys down here because the old oyster luggers still going strong.
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Old 09-23-2018, 06:38 PM   #12
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Regarding maintenance costs, I looked at a 42 foot wood trawler with a Gardner engine. Not at all in the same league as the Boing yacht, but lovely in pictures and I have a soft spot for that engine. Professionally converted in 1990. I saw some of the recent maintenance invoices. My eyes started watering. $75k for hull, topside and bottom paint. Scheduled to be done every 2 years or sooner. And when I looked at her, the hull was already again bleeding rust stains at most fasteners. You have to be a wood connoisseur with deep pockets. The yacht above would easily consume several hundreds of thousands of dollars every year just for basic upkeep.
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Old 09-23-2018, 07:22 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Tete Dure View Post
Everyone says how much wooden boat coast to maintain but no one actually puts a price.

2000k a month? 1000k a month? We still have wooden boat guys down here because the old oyster luggers still going strong.
That all depends on how much work you do yourself. For me, I do everything, including heavy duty frame repair, which I find interesting by necessity.

I don't spend really any extra per month if I can help it. I might spend less than $ 50 per month in various repairs. Mostly I find the boat needs painting and refinishing too frequently, IMO. My lower hull I have very little paint issues with, hull can look good for 10 yrs after a paint job. It is my upper hull where I battle some cracking joints keeping them sealed. And some peeling spots or paint bubbling develop. Cracks let in water and then it rots. A mixture of 90% rubbing alcohol mixed with roach powder (boric acid) painted and sprayed inside and around the boat kills rot and keeps it from growing. Or you can use green antifreeze mixed with boric acid.

I am looking at a spring haul 2019 and I need to have a prop shaft checked and the prop, I can't do that myself. I will replace the cutlass bushings, and the trim tabs myself, and paint the hull. I did an in water frame section repair last month, the floor (joist) on top of a frame (rib) section on the end rotted 20 inches worth of floor wood and 10 inches of frame and the screws need to be replaced for that. My hull is sealed mostly watertite by various rubber products that create a membrane on the outside. So I was able to excise the rot right down to the planking even cutting the bronze screws clear off and it was watertite. You have to be ingenious to scarf in sections of wood. To replace the floor section (it fits between a fir stringer and the frame), I had to divide it into thirds to get it to move into position. Then glue and clamp it. I could not get my jig saw in there, a chisel and hammer worked fine to remove the rot and create the scarf. I used a piece of paper board to make a pattern and then had to painstakingly grind and cut it to an exact fit. Thankfully glues like epoxy or PL Premium do take up all the little spaces you can't get perfect. It is glues and screws holding the boat together.

Since the outside is entirely sealed in rubber, I have no issues with hull needing to swell or worms or gribbles.

Last year I completely rebuilt the aft deck upper transom area, removed all those teak covering boards, redid with all new supports and plywood, used all PT wood. And I improved on the original construction strength. Did that in the water.

Working on a wood boat is like repairing a fine piece of antique furniture.
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Old 09-23-2018, 07:34 PM   #14
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Regarding maintenance costs, I looked at a 42 foot wood trawler with a Gardner engine. Not at all in the same league as the Boing yacht, but lovely in pictures and I have a soft spot for that engine. Professionally converted in 1990. I saw some of the recent maintenance invoices. My eyes started watering. $75k for hull, topside and bottom paint. Scheduled to be done every 2 years or sooner. And when I looked at her, the hull was already again bleeding rust stains at most fasteners. You have to be a wood connoisseur with deep pockets. The yacht above would easily consume several hundreds of thousands of dollars every year just for basic upkeep.

Oh boy that is expensive. To further expand on your knowledge of wooden boats. Are all fasteners built the same? Are there some fasteners better than others?

Before I proceed, I just want to say, I don't doubt what you told me but I still see the old wooden luggers being used by oyster fisherman. I know those guys aren't spending that kind of money on keeping their boats up.

1) Do they do their own maintenance (I'm going to ask my family still living in South Lafourche)? If so, how hard is changing fasteners and painting and how much money would one save?

2) Is the price a regional? We all know buying a 68 Porsche prices will be the same through the country but a house in Baton Rouge is way cheaper than San Fransisco.

I surely can't afford 75k a year in upkeep.

Thanks for helping out.
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Old 09-23-2018, 07:44 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Tete Dure View Post
Oh boy that is expensive. To further expand on your knowledge of wooden boats. Are all fasteners built the same? Are there some fasteners better than others?

Before I proceed, I just want to say, I don't doubt what you told me but I still see the old wooden luggers being used by oyster fisherman. I know those guys aren't spending that kind of money on keeping their boats up.

1) Do they do their own maintenance (I'm going to ask my family still living in South Lafourche)? If so, how hard is changing fasteners and painting and how much money would one save?

2) Is the price a regional? We all know buying a 68 Porsche prices will be the same through the country but a house in Baton Rouge is way cheaper than San Fransisco.

I surely can't afford 75k a year in upkeep.

Thanks for helping out.
Bleeding fasteners? Must be iron. My boat is all bronze screw fastened. Back in 2006, I refastened the lower hull with 4000 #12 1 3/4" long screws. Replaced many rotten and broken frames. Then I sealed the entire underwater hull in rubber. Something like I did need not be done again for decades, maybe never. we will see. I saw no evidence anyone had rescrewd the hull before me, so the first screw job lasted many decades. In 2014, I pulled out some screws and they were still like new. But some frames I did not replace were going soft. They are not in an important spot seriously. My boat is built like this, 1 inch mahogany planks, then 2.25 by 1.25" ribs. On top of most ribs are these huge heavy oak frames that run from side to side the entire width of the hull. They are spaced about 9 inches apart. In the center is an almost full length keel about 8 inches
wide. And under the keel is a large skeg keel bronze bolted to the center keel. When I glued together all the underwater planks and sealed the hull it formed a more unitary structure, which strengthened the entire boat.

A wood hull is better than a steel hull, IMO. And a fiberglass hull is better than a wood hull. But a wood hull feels more like your in tune with the natural world.
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Old 09-23-2018, 10:06 PM   #16
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That all depends on how much work you do yourself. For me, I do everything, including heavy duty frame repair, which I find interesting by necessity.

I don't spend really any extra per month if I can help it. I might spend less than $ 50 per month in various repairs. Mostly I find the boat needs painting and refinishing too frequently, IMO. My lower hull I have very little paint issues with, hull can look good for 10 yrs after a paint job. It is my upper hull where I battle some cracking joints keeping them sealed. And some peeling spots or paint bubbling develop. Cracks let in water and then it rots. A mixture of 90% rubbing alcohol mixed with roach powder (boric acid) painted and sprayed inside and around the boat kills rot and keeps it from growing. Or you can use green antifreeze mixed with boric acid.

I am looking at a spring haul 2019 and I need to have a prop shaft checked and the prop, I can't do that myself. I will replace the cutlass bushings, and the trim tabs myself, and paint the hull. I did an in water frame section repair last month, the floor (joist) on top of a frame (rib) section on the end rotted 20 inches worth of floor wood and 10 inches of frame and the screws need to be replaced for that. My hull is sealed mostly watertite by various rubber products that create a membrane on the outside. So I was able to excise the rot right down to the planking even cutting the bronze screws clear off and it was watertite. You have to be ingenious to scarf in sections of wood. To replace the floor section (it fits between a fir stringer and the frame), I had to divide it into thirds to get it to move into position. Then glue and clamp it. I could not get my jig saw in there, a chisel and hammer worked fine to remove the rot and create the scarf. I used a piece of paper board to make a pattern and then had to painstakingly grind and cut it to an exact fit. Thankfully glues like epoxy or PL Premium do take up all the little spaces you can't get perfect. It is glues and screws holding the boat together.

Since the outside is entirely sealed in rubber, I have no issues with hull needing to swell or worms or gribbles.

Last year I completely rebuilt the aft deck upper transom area, removed all those teak covering boards, redid with all new supports and plywood, used all PT wood. And I improved on the original construction strength. Did that in the water.

Working on a wood boat is like repairing a fine piece of antique furniture.
Thanks for all the info. It will help me make a good decision on the feasibility of owning a wood boat.
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Old 09-23-2018, 10:21 PM   #17
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Gorgeous boat!

It’s pointless to discuss a wood boat on a plastic toy boat forum.
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Old 09-23-2018, 11:46 PM   #18
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Madisonville Wooden Boat Festival coming up in October.

https://woodenboatfest.org/

Wooden Boat Festival In Madisonville LA | Oct 14-15
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Old 09-24-2018, 03:17 AM   #19
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Gorgeous boat!

Its pointless to discuss a wood boat on a plastic toy boat forum.
Where does it say its a plastic toy boat forum?
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Old 09-24-2018, 03:24 AM   #20
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Working on a wood boat is like repairing a fine piece of antique furniture.
That's one way to look at it


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but I still see the old wooden luggers being used by oyster fisherman. I know those guys aren't spending that kind of money on keeping their boats up.
.
And that's the other way.

There are timber working trawlers and ferries still being used over here as well and I can assure you, fine pieces of antique furniture they are not but that doesn't mean they are not sound boats doing what they were made to do.
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