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Old 05-12-2015, 05:40 PM   #81
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Regarding NT and side decks, here is my observation. First, I'd love a boat with side decks like the Flemming picture above. However, that is not currently in our budget. As for our NT, we do not have side decks, but we do have the interior space as a tradeoff. We do have a narrow area of nonskid along the side decks that works fine for us when rafting up, but I wouldn't walk out there in bad weather. What we do have is great pilothouse doors on either side that allow me to pull up to a dock, and step right out with line in hand. I can even reach in to bump the boat into or out of gear or hit the thruster from the dock as I'm tying lines. It works for us, but I'm not saying it is the best or only way to go. Just our experience.

One other person commented previously that the NT 32/34 is too small for a retirement boat. While our plan is to eventually move up to a NT 37/39 someday, we actually comment all the time that our NT is the perfect size for us - a couple that spends days to a couple weeks on the boat at a time, and only ocassionaly has friends on board for more than a day cruise. In sum, for us, we could easily spend weeks or months on this boat. Now that may not work for others and, yes, we would like to move up one day, but we could also be perfectly happy with this boat for the long term. One thing I always tell my wife is when I say I want to get a bigger boat, make me go to the marina and wash ours first, then see if I still feel the same.

Lastly, for the same money we could have gone larger with another brand, but for us the NT had everything we wanted, including the pilot house, upper deck for entertaining (we have a bimini and full rails), quality of construction, single Cummins, full keel, and good resale to name a few. Everyone will have a different list, but if I had to do it again I would buy the same boat, for us.
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Old 05-12-2015, 06:47 PM   #82
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I look at the GB and NTs and wonder about the lack of bow flare.
Don't know about NTs because I've never ridden on one, but having owned a GB for the last 17 years I can tell you that quartering into wind waves or high chop makes for a very wet boat. We don't care about that and it's good for the deck (), but some boaters might not like a constant deluge of spray coming aboard on even a mildly windy day.
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Old 05-12-2015, 08:27 PM   #83
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Don't know about NTs because I've never ridden on one, but having owned a GB for the last 17 years I can tell you that quartering into wind waves or high chop makes for a very wet boat. We don't care about that and it's good for the deck (), but some boaters might not like a constant deluge of spray coming aboard on even a mildly windy day.
Some very good boats are wet. It's a characteristic and important to some people, but not an indication of the quality of the boat.
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Old 05-13-2015, 04:39 PM   #84
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Our NT can be a "wet" boat at times. Coming from smaller, planing power boats and a sailboat, I was a bit surprised at first. However, we quickly got used to it and with the pilothouse it really isn't an issue. In fact, last year we were on a trip where we had 30kt winds on the nose with short, steep chop. The winshield wipers got a good workout, but otherwise we were dry and comfortable in t-shirts in the pilothouse. Our friends in a flybridge boat following behind us to let us cut the waves and wind were not nearly as comfortable. In fact, we had spray going over our pilothouse and hitting them square on all the way up on the flybridge.

This is our first pilothouse boat and as of now I don't think we will ever have another boat without a pilothouse. We initially wanted both a pilothouse and flybridge but as we all know every boat is a compromise. I don't even miss being outside in the really nice weather - just open all the windows, doors and hatches and there is a ton of airflow, and it is actually nice to be out of the sun. If it gets too hot, we can close up and run the generator. When it is cold, everyone wants to ride with us becuase we have heat.
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Old 05-14-2015, 02:25 AM   #85
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In smaller boats, it is my opinion and theory that a wet ride and a good ride are counter to one another. A decent riding(ie good sea boat) is usually wet because the forward part of the boat is going THROUGH the weather and not over it. When it goes through the weather, you get spray. When you go over it(ie dry), it is not a good ride.
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Old 05-14-2015, 09:34 AM   #86
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That is a good oberservation Baker. I had not thought of it that way. Actually, I've noticed that our NT just shoulders into the chop, while my friends in the relatively lighter flybridge boats are bouncing around.
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Old 05-14-2015, 09:51 AM   #87
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It is the reason a semi planing hull is chosen for a boat that will go faster than hull speed. A semi planing hull is less efficient than a pure planing hull due to the fact that the forward part of the hull is not producing much lift. But the advantage to this is what I mentioned above. No lift means the forward sections are going THROUGH the water and not over it. A semi planing hull is a much better ride in chop than a planing hull because of this!!!
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Old 05-14-2015, 09:55 AM   #88
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In the tropics!

Side decks and aft deck in Tropical country
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Old 05-14-2015, 10:08 AM   #89
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Side decks and aft deck in Tropical country
That is very nice, good sun and rain protection when out and about with secure side decks for safety.

The N57 is my favorite setup. Full covered walk around except at the aft port salon. Port and starboard boarding doors on both salon and PH level.

But size matters, can't have it all in a 30 something footer.
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Old 05-14-2015, 10:12 AM   #90
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Side decks and aft deck in Tropical country
Yeah, and great hand rails too! That baby sure rides downhill at the stern.
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Old 05-14-2015, 10:33 AM   #91
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A semi planing hull is a much better ride in chop than a planing hull because of this!!!
I have thought for years that the Ocean Alexander 42 has a planing hull. It was pointed out to me a few weeks ago that the OA 42 has a semi displacement hull! last week, In a ride off shore we encountered a "chop" that really opened my eyes! The ride was terrific! (comfortable) So far, I haven't had the boat in any 4-6 footers so I don't know how she'll handle those.
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Old 05-14-2015, 10:56 AM   #92
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Baker your'e right IMO.

Attitude (or angle of attack) and weight for a smoother ride. But makes for a wet boat. Speed also makes a boat wet if not fast enough to push her bow up. Willy is surprisingly dry mostly because of the lack of the hard chine and speed .. mostly the latter. Balance adds to it too. Willy rises up over waves because she carries her weight further aft where there's lots of hull to support her considerable weight. Lots of trawlers have aft cabins and the wheelhouse further fwd and hence the engines (heavy) a bit too far fwd. Some W30 models lean a bit in that direction. Boats are pointy at that end where support from the sea is lacking. All chain anchor rodes aren't a plus in this reguard either.
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Old 05-14-2015, 11:14 AM   #93
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Codger,
Looks like a planing hull to me.
What features of the OA take her out of the SD catergory?
Given enough power will this boat do 25 knots?
I'm thinking that would make her a planing hull.
From the pics she dosn't look heavy and the huge blade area of those props hints of lots of power.
Are your engines broken in yet and have you gone to WOT?

She's probably a balanced boat and quite level riding as a result. That would be a big plus for the ride. Also she's a big boat and larger boats have a beam to length ratio that is a bit more long and narrow than smaller boats. That will help keep the ride more level.
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Old 05-14-2015, 11:55 AM   #94
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Codger,
Looks like a planing hull to me. Looks like a planing hull to me, too!
What features of the OA take her out of the SD catergory? I don't know.
Given enough power will this boat do 25 knots? Yes (With 500s) I have 440s. She does 23 knots at WOT.
I'm thinking that would make her a planing hull. I agree! But the specs say she is an SD.
From the pics she doesn't look heavy and the huge blade area of those props hints of lots of power.33,000#
Are your engines broken in yet and have you gone to WOT? She has 293 hours on the engines and, yes, I've been to WOT several times.

She's probably a balanced boat and quite level riding as a result. I find this to be accurate. That would be a big plus for the ride. Also she's a big boat and larger boats have a beam to length ratio that is a bit more long and narrow than smaller boats. That will help keep the ride more level.
I'm impressed as to how much you get out of a few photos and 1 video! I'll send you photos of my next buy before I close on the deal. (Just kidding! I'm pretty sure that this will be my last boat.)
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Old 05-14-2015, 12:31 PM   #95
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For a 42' boat 33,000 pounds seems fairly light. On the Travelift our GB36 weighs in at 30,000 pounds. Even with a pair of 220 Cummins in them the best this model can do is about 14-16 knots I believe.
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Old 05-14-2015, 12:41 PM   #96
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Walt, we'd really need to see the front portion of the hull as that is where it is usually deep and lacking planing/lifting area. And then the hull begins to flatten as you go aft. One of the things planing hull manufacturers employ to make the ride better is deadrise. And that is how much Vee is at the stern...or how much of it is carried aft. But the result is the same....less lift(and lost efficiency) while allowing the boat to go through the weather.
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Old 05-14-2015, 01:11 PM   #97
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On the Travelift our GB36 weighs in at 30,000 pounds. .
I don't doubt your numbers but in 30 years of owning boats over 30ft and watching the gauge on Travel Lifts, I have yet to see one that is even close to the manufacture's listed weight of 33,100# empty. (IE) My boat tipped the scale on a one year old Travel Lift at 40,000+. Even with 500 gals of diesel and 150 gals of water, (which she didn't have) plus some personal belongings she shouldn't go over 40,000#.
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Old 05-14-2015, 01:15 PM   #98
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Baker,
Depends on where the boat rides. A "cigarette" will run at speed on just the aft part of the hull w everything fwd completely out of the water. Lots of deadrise for a reasonable ride.

A slow boat will not benefit (in this way) from increased deadrise aft.

The best pic of Walt's boat would be from abeam or just aft of that and w the camera just below the WL. We will be looking for "rocker". Or a lot of "warp" or twist in the hull .. like a GB. With straight longitudinal lines she can only be a planing hull. What's aft is 98% of the story. A CHB is close to planing at her chine but at the keel there is pronounced rocker and looks mostly like a FD hull.

With Walt's boat .. for her size .. relatively light and having straight lines aft (except a bit of the tunnels) puts her in the planing type. But in Walt's case I'll bet the "specs" are selling boats. Brokers, Builders and other sellers in this day are selling boats and frequently stretch the truth. "But the broker said it was FD".

But someone aluded to the fact that I was making an educated guess having not see good pics of the boat. Ture. but as the football flies through the air we can guess the shape of the other side. And I'll change my tune if pics are forthcoming and show that the boat has rocker ... like a NT. There is a good SD hull.

It's hard to imagine OA making a false claim here so maybe she is a SD boat. They have a lot to loose by false claims and IMO may have a case.

Baker,
Actually "deadrise" applies to the angle of rise of the bottom toward the chine from the keel anywhere fore and aft. I think you're thinking of the expression "constant deadrise" and that does apply to approximately amidships to the transom. Most all boats have deeper deadrise in the forefoot. So some warp is always present fwd in most boats especially hard chine.
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Old 05-14-2015, 01:25 PM   #99
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Walt, we'd really need to see the front portion of the hull as that is where it is usually deep and lacking planing/lifting area. And then the hull begins to flatten as you go aft..
This is the best I can do in the photo department. I suppose if you draw a straight line across the
tunnels, meeting at the center line, you get some idea of the deadrise.
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Old 05-14-2015, 01:34 PM   #100
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The best pic of Walt's boat would be from abeam or just aft of that .......

It's hard to imagine OA making a false claim here so maybe she is a SD boat. They have a lot to loose by false claims and IMO may have a case.
This about as close as I have to what you are describing.
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