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Old 05-09-2015, 04:03 PM   #41
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struck the right balance.

Key words there no matter what the boat...
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Old 05-09-2015, 07:47 PM   #42
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I actually lean towards the Yanmar simply because they have offered me such excellent service in the past. Now I am married to a pair of Cummins and they are slowly winning me over.
Interesting! I now have a pair of Yanmars that I was really concerned about as I was a confirmed Cummins fan. I wanted a 42 OA sedan with a hard top, twin births in the guest cabin & Cummins engines. The boat I bought had everything I wanted except Cummins engines. I am slowly moving to the Yanmar camp as (so far) I haven't had a hint of trouble. Could it simply be explained as demonstrating a bias for what we bought?
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Old 05-09-2015, 08:15 PM   #43
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I have read many anecdotal references about Yanmars in Mainships not always having the best exhaust elbow alignment with problems ensuing due to water in engine. That is not a fault of the engine. I have personally seen one 34 Mainship where the elbow was too low.

Codger's kudos are the same as I have heard from others including Tony Athens regarding most but not all Yanmar marine engines.
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Old 05-09-2015, 08:33 PM   #44
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Codger, that's a very complicated-looking machine with all those tubes and roundy things. but it's still clean and spotless!





Makes my JD look like a simpleton:


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Old 05-09-2015, 10:43 PM   #45
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Codger, that's a very complicated-looking machine with all those tubes and roundy things. but it's still clean and spotless!
Those were my thoughts, exactly, when I first saw the engines. Crawling around in the ER with the manual, however, reduced my stress level. They are not really that complicated.

There's a ladder in the ER.
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Old 05-10-2015, 07:16 AM   #46
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One major difference in my book was the walk around designs.
We do a lot of locking and the lack of a continuous walk around on the smaller size tugs was a deal breaker. Having to enter the cabin go up/down stairs to get fwd or aft for lines, fenders, etc was a deal breaker.
But that's because of our cruising style... not necessarily others.
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Old 05-10-2015, 09:33 AM   #47
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Good comments. I never considered the "comfort on the hook" argument. I like being outside whenever I can. I live in NY now. So, I do spend most of my time outside, so outside space is important. When I do end up in Fl., there is that 90+ degrees and the 400% humidity to deal with. My friends down there cruise in the "cooler" months and do (pay people) maintenance in the "hot" months. That opens a new door. Which boat suits Fl. better? OK. So now I have a bunch of questions answered and a bunch of NEW questions. Good thing I have a boat to use while I'm figuring this out.
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Old 05-10-2015, 09:45 AM   #48
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Good comments. I never considered the "comfort on the hook" argument.
Comfort cannot be overstated if you are planning on extended time aboard.

For example those wonderful walk around decks. Gosh they are wonderful docking once or twice a day for all three minutes you use them.

The extra three feet in cabin width you'll get in a boat without them is something you'll use every minute you are aboard.

Lots of tradeoffs in a boat.
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Old 05-10-2015, 10:12 AM   #49
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Are Nordic Tugs worth the money?

I would suggest that you see if you can charter a Mainship before your buy. We chartered a Mainship 350/390. Actually I liked the operational aspects of the boat. Thought it handled very well even in 4' seas. It was very responsive to the rudder controls. Can't comment on the autopilot functionality as these were disabled in the charter fleet we used. I only looked at the lower helm station. It was quite useless in my opinion as it was so cramped.

We didn't like the salon space and my wife didn't like the forward stateroom. In the end, we thought it was a good weekender or 1 week boat, but not as suitable for us for long duration trips.

But that's us. You should charter one and see if you like it for your purposes.

The two boats that we chartered made us realize that space and comfort were important requirements for our purpose.

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Old 05-10-2015, 10:31 AM   #50
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The extra three feet in cabin width you'll get in a boat without them is something you'll use every minute you are aboard.
How so? Not when you are on the flying bridge, or down below, or in our case the aft deck. Or sitting on the foredeck bench or up on the forward sun pads. On many boats, it only affects the salon.
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Old 05-10-2015, 10:45 AM   #51
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Comfort cannot be overstated if you are planning on extended time aboard.
That's certainly been my experience. I loved the 32' Havorsen but when we got Sandpiper and all that extra room, my wife fell in love with the boat. Sandpiper was supposed to be my "man cave" but such is not the case. She's on it more than I am.
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Old 05-10-2015, 11:54 AM   #52
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After years of watching people with toerail boats gingerly creep aroun during docking, anchoring, putting out fenders, etch-- and seeing at least a few loose their footing and fall in-- there is no way in hell we'd ever have a boat without a full walkaround deck. Sure, we aren't on it all the time. We aren't in our garage at home much of the time either. But both things are fabulous to have when we need them. To be able to get from the bow to the stern quickly and easily even in rough water-- priceless advantage in our book.

A couple more feet of width in the main cabin is no trade off as far as we're concerned. It's not like were pacing back and forth in there all day. Mostly we're just sitting and an extra couple of feet of width would make zero difference to that.

But that full deck-- that's one of the best features of our PNW boat and after years of enjoying its advantages we insisted on it for our other one. We're we in the market for a boat today, new or used, we wouldn't even consider a boat without a full deck, no matter how clever and roomy the boat was otherwise.
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Old 05-10-2015, 01:13 PM   #53
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Our boat's beam measures 14'4" at the water and it has a nice wide "walk around." The rails are quite high but they could use a cable life line between the gunnel and top rail. (Forthcoming)
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Old 05-10-2015, 01:42 PM   #54
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I don't agree w Baker at all. His post #37 sounds like SOMBODY on food stamps buying cheap cereal at Walmart observing they get 8oz more cereal that the good cereal.

To me the most important part of a boat is the hull. First it's shape and then it's build quality. Mainship has built a boat that I belive is flawed in hull shape. Would'nt buy one .. the flawed one or annother because it may be designed by the same bloke. Tom's point re Baidarka I is excellent. The design quality of the NT 32 is insured basically by examples of this kind.

Northern Spy brings the point home about appearent build quality. Not much will be learned by walking the float looking at boats. But after looking at the hand rails of several larger boats some build quality can be seen. But the real build quality must be seen in the bilges where most people don't look. Or better yet at the plant where the boats are constructed.

Cheap boats will have faster depreciation and good boats tend to hold value. But the market is driven by "perceived" quality that may be valid or just market buzz or hype.

But for the OP if there is some reasons the NT 32 is lacking my advice would be to look at more boats to compare the NT with.

Older Nordic Tug 32s bottom out at 100K. I've only seen one (just the other day) at 89500. As the boats get newer the price difference gets smaller. The low end boats will drop out some day but so far their market value is as bullet proof as a yacht can get.
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Old 05-10-2015, 03:12 PM   #55
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Gee whiz Eric, why are there so many decades-old Mainships out there? Hasn't someone told them they don't deserve to be afloat? And what on earth must their owners be thinking taking them out year after year on the briney blue?
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Old 05-10-2015, 03:25 PM   #56
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The Nordic Tugs are excellent boats and very well built. But they may not be the best boat for the OP. The Mainship may be just fine for his intended purpose.

WRT space, the NT isn't as spacious as others in the same length-on-deck class. We found that the KK42 was by far the largest of the 42' LOD group. Much bigger than the NT, Nordhavn 40, the North Pacific Trawler and others. Our wheelhouse has floor space that is 10'6" wide and 4'2" deep not including the helm dash that is 34" deep and the watch berth that is 33 deep and 6'8" long.

Side decks...this docking newbie sure appreciates them as does his admiral and sometime crew!


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Old 05-10-2015, 03:38 PM   #57
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This side deck issue and preferances are interesting

On my Bayliner we have no safely usable side decks in the salon area of the boat. That makes the salon bigger, no arguing that. How much depends on the design of the side decks but at least 2' and I think at least 3' for boats with really nice side decks inside the boat as opposed to the rail protected ones.

Docking is not the Goat rope some ellude to. From the pilothouse I can safely access the forward half of the boat. Three steps from the helm either direction and I'm tying up the boat.

The cockpit is large and provides a easy safe place from which to tie up the aft of the boat.

In our experience from a practical standpoint, having docked my boat many times in a variety of conditions, its a rare day that I wish I even have side decks. Yes occasionally when I single hand, if the wind is REALLY blowing me away from the dock side decks would be nice, but those days are rare and docking lasts but a few minutes.

At the same time sitting in the nice roomy salon I am very glad every day that I have that three feet of extra space inside.
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Old 05-10-2015, 04:26 PM   #58
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...
But that full deck-- that's one of the best features of our PNW boat and after years of enjoying its advantages we insisted on it for our other one. We're we in the market for a boat today, new or used, we wouldn't even consider a boat without a full deck, no matter how clever and roomy the boat was otherwise.


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Old 05-10-2015, 05:04 PM   #59
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I think the KK48 North Sea

Quote:
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The Nordic Tugs are excellent boats and very well built. But they may not be the best boat for the OP. The Mainship may be just fine for his intended purpose.

WRT space, the NT isn't as spacious as others in the same length-on-deck class. We found that the KK42 was by far the largest of the 42' LOD group. Much bigger than the NT, Nordhavn 40, the North Pacific Trawler and others. Our wheelhouse has floor space that is 10'6" wide and 4'2" deep not including the helm dash that is 34" deep and the watch berth that is 33 deep and 6'8" long.

Side decks...this docking newbie sure appreciates them as does his admiral and sometime crew!


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If I'm not mistaken the newer KK North Sea 48 has only a side deck at the salon on the starboard side, the 48 WhaleBack has no side decks. I have had two 48' pilot house boats with marginal side decks, 4788 Bayliner and the 48 LRC Hatteras. The only use I see for side Decks would be deploying fish. The advantages of the larger salon with it's larger entertainment area on the boat deck far out weigh any occasional use of side decks aft of the pilot house.
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Old 05-10-2015, 05:25 PM   #60
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Nordic Tugs are cute

They are cute boats that do a poor job of providing and utilizing space. For their length they don't provide much living and entertaining area. the cockpit is small and uncovered, The salon roof is not set up for entertaining, most don't have a flying bridge, master stateroom is small, galley is not well laid out. They may be well made, however I just saw a rudder and rudder post being replaced and I wasn't impressed. They do provide character and an impression of being a rugged work boat. They are so cute they are hard not to like.
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