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Old 09-22-2018, 04:43 PM   #1
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Nordhavn 35, safe enough for a Carribean passage?

Nordhavn 35 is a sturdy baby trawler (advertised as coastal cruiser) that has a range between 450 - 2000 Miles dep. on speed.
Is here anyone who used this small boat for 500 miles+ passages.
Is it reasonable safe to use it for a Caribbean passage North/South.
-Roughly a 3 x24 hrs (no stabilisation) ride on 7 knots-
I did ask an owner of a 35 but he never went out more then 15 miles from the coastline and said he was not too curious as well.... (sounded not too promissing)
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Old 09-22-2018, 04:58 PM   #2
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I would not hesitate to take the N35 anywhere in the Carribean. Its a competent coastal cruiser, not an Ocean crosser.
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Old 09-22-2018, 06:22 PM   #3
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Greetings,
Welcome aboard. What Mr. SoF said BUT watch your weather closely.
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Old 09-22-2018, 07:08 PM   #4
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The Nordhavn 35 is NOT a blue water passagemaker. A BWP has heavy windows, redundant systems, ballast for stability and often dynamic stabilization. It is designed to deal with whatever Mother Nature throws at you, short of a full blown hurricane.

The N35 is a very well built coastal cruiser. With 590 gallons of fuel it can go beyond reasonable weather forecasts cruising at 7 kts so you could get in trouble. But if you watch the weather and have a bail out port in mind after about 3 days from shore, then you can go anywhere in the Caribbean.

But 2,000 miles, NFW

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Old 09-22-2018, 07:41 PM   #5
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N35

I suggest you talk with Jeff Merrill at JMYS about the N35. He was the project manager while at PAE and took the boat on many trips.

Having owned three Nordhavns including N3522 I can confirm it's well built but the boat but it never reached its designed speed or performance. If I was looking to travel the Caribbean I would look at the Helmsman 38 also.

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Old 09-22-2018, 10:40 PM   #6
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I suggest you talk with Jeff Merrill at JMYS about the N35. He was the project manager while at PAE and took the boat on many trips.

Having owned three Nordhavns including N3522 I can confirm it's well built but the boat but it never reached its designed speed or performance. If I was looking to travel the Caribbean I would look at the Helmsman 38 also.

John T
I second the recommendation to talk to Jeff. He can be reached at 949.355.4950, but remember he's West Coast (PT) time zone.
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Old 09-23-2018, 05:01 AM   #7
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Cruising the Carib would be fine , the challenge is getting there.

The "Thornles Path " is the usual guide.


The Gentleman's Guide to Passages South: The Thornless Path to ...

https://www.amazon.com/Gentlemans-Gu.../.../147014696...


The Gentleman's Guide to Passages South: The Thornless Path to Windward Paperback – March 14, 2012. ... This is the Tenth and last Edition of the popular directions for sailing south to the Bahamas and the Caribbean. For more than twenty years Van Sant repeatedly surveyed nearly 200 ...
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Old 09-24-2018, 02:22 AM   #8
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Cruising the Carib would be fine , the challenge is getting there.

The "Thornles Path " is the usual guide.


The Gentleman's Guide to Passages South: The Thornless Path to ...

https://www.amazon.com/Gentlemans-Gu.../.../147014696...


The Gentleman's Guide to Passages South: The Thornless Path to Windward Paperback March 14, 2012. ... This is the Tenth and last Edition of the popular directions for sailing south to the Bahamas and the Caribbean. For more than twenty years Van Sant repeatedly surveyed nearly 200 ...
Thank you ; indeed did read this. I do live in this area (DR) most of the time. The author Van Sant is- or was always in the bay of Luperon, DR.
This book is more about sailing there then to find out if the smallest boat you could safely afford is a N35. Also from the late George Buehler's desk a few good books about trawlers are available. Despite I read them all I would like to get the imput from a N35 user. -Reason of the post here-
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Old 09-24-2018, 02:33 AM   #9
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I suggest you talk with Jeff Merrill at JMYS about the N35. He was the project manager while at PAE and took the boat on many trips.

Having owned three Nordhavns including N3522 I can confirm it's well built but the boat but it never reached its designed speed or performance. If I was looking to travel the Caribbean I would look at the Helmsman 38 also.

John T
Thank you for reacting. How you used yr N35 ?if I may ask.
I am extremely lucky enough to not have an "Admiral" aboard, so space is no issue but comfort and safety are ofcoarse points of interest.
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Old 09-24-2018, 06:21 AM   #10
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More often it is a question will the people inside survive what nature throws at the boat.
Break down and call the Nordhavn people and ask them the max recovery roll angle. Get their option on the max weather is safe. Then realize the recovery information is "lightly loaded."
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Old 09-24-2018, 06:46 AM   #11
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The book were written because sailboats go upwind , esp into the trades with great difficulty. Therefore his method of using Northers to make progress.

Dong the trip under power is far less effort.You can use the calm days the sail folks cant.

The only exposure to rough water is the Mona Passage between the Dom Rep and PR.

THe trades die off a good deal at night , so thats the time to power away.

With extra fuel out 23ft IO could make the leg , a 35 ft anything should not have a problem, except in a Norther.


http://www.caribbeancompass.com/mona_passage_2015.html
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Old 09-24-2018, 07:20 AM   #12
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I've looked at a number of routes down there and thankfully you can step stone your way there like FF stated, I think in many cases its about weather and your planning that will count the most.
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Old 09-24-2018, 08:16 AM   #13
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More often it is a question will the people inside survive what nature throws at the boat.
Break down and call the Nordhavn people and ask them the max recovery roll angle. Get their option on the max weather is safe. Then realize the recovery information is "lightly loaded."

All good points, but I doubt that Nordhavn will provide that data for a boat they said is a coastal cruiser.



Since the N35 is a semi-displacement hull with no ballast, my guess is that the max roll angle is similar to other similarly designed boats- the GBs, etc. As I vaguely recall, hulls of that nature have an 80 degree roll recovery angle. Compare this with sailboats in the 120-140 degree range and Krogens at a little less.


But maximum roll angle is only one safety factor that blue water boats need. The pilot house windows need to be able to withstand a slug of green water over the bow, the downflooding angle (the angle at which water begins to flood through vents) needs to be roughly the same as the maximum roll angle, systems need to be installed so they won't break loose in a significant roll, etc.


All being said, I wouldn't want to take a N35 in conditions with 10' seas and I wouldn't plan a passage where they were forecast to be above 6'. That significantly limits when you can go in the Caribbean.



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Old 09-24-2018, 09:24 AM   #14
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if the smallest boat you could safely afford is a N35.
For about 15% more money, you could get a Kadey-Krogen 39' which is a true blue water boat and much better for cruising the Caribbean. Certainly, it is a larger boat and isn't stabilized. Realize this doesn't answer your question.

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/200...g#.W6jxV_YpDb0
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Old 09-24-2018, 10:19 AM   #15
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Hello Old Dan. Thx for reacting on the N35 question from Old Cornelis.

Indeed the point is that someone (a "knowledgable owner") wants to sell me a 16 year old low hrs N35, "full equipped" for below 200.000 Euro. I can't only find a Krogen for that plus 15% but for some reason I would feel better with a Nordhavn.
But a 35....? For the single handed 500-Mile+ trips to Curacao and Bonaire ...?
Am sure there are N35 users at this forum that could tell me what they used their boats for. The man that wants to sell his one to me never left the coastline.
Not too many N35 stories either in the fora I am familiar with.
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Old 09-24-2018, 10:47 AM   #16
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All good points, but I doubt that Nordhavn will provide that data for a boat they said is a coastal cruiser.



Since the N35 is a semi-displacement hull with no ballast, my guess is that the max roll angle is similar to other similarly designed boats- the GBs, etc. As I vaguely recall, hulls of that nature have an 80 degree roll recovery angle. Compare this with sailboats in the 120-140 degree range and Krogens at a little less.


But maximum roll angle is only one safety factor that blue water boats need. The pilot house windows need to be able to withstand a slug of green water over the bow, the downflooding angle (the angle at which water begins to flood through vents) needs to be roughly the same as the maximum roll angle, systems need to be installed so they won't break loose in a significant roll, etc.


All being said, I wouldn't want to take a N35 in conditions with 10' seas and I wouldn't plan a passage where they were forecast to be above 6'. That significantly limits when you can go in the Caribbean.



David
When I had a 46, with hydraulic stabilizers, I called the Nordhavn people and asked about recoverable rolls, that where I got the phrase, 'the boat will recover.... but not so sure you want to be onboard. You may not recover.
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Old 09-24-2018, 11:47 AM   #17
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I don't know what the safe range is on a 35 Nordie , but I would not use others use as a yard stick. Just because nobody has taken one on a 500 mile passage,doesn't mean the boat can't do it. Most owners don't ever leave sight of land,no matter what they are riding. Sea stories don't count
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Old 09-24-2018, 12:01 PM   #18
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I don't know what the safe range is on a 35 Nordie , but I would not use others use as a yard stick. Just because nobody has taken one on a 500 mile passage,doesn't mean the boat can't do it. Most owners don't ever leave sight of land,no matter what they are riding. Sea stories don't count
That is why I recommend calling the Nordhavn folks and ask the question, directly.
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Old 09-24-2018, 01:10 PM   #19
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This is SUCH a subjective question, because its not really could you do it...its could you do it comfortably. "Comfort" is different for everyone. I don't think a manufacturer would ever say "Yes, you can take this boat from point A to point B", because that implies a guarantee that a trip is feasable, and common sense says there are times when any trip is going to be risky.

If I said I had an N35 and made that trip that doesn't mean you could make that trip. Maybe I had better weather, or was lucky, or am an amazingly skilled captain. Too many variables.

Consider that Missouri Duck Boat accident. 2 Identical boats in the same place on a the same course....2 very different outcomes.

The answer to "can this boat make this trip" is always going to be a very qualified maybe.
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Old 09-24-2018, 01:53 PM   #20
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IMHO the 35 can make the trip but as Benthic2 mentions what about comfort. We went through the Eastern Carabbean for 2 plus seasons. Travel up or down is with the wind and seas on the beam for the most part. Without stabilization, the ride can be miserable. From December through March, plus or minus, the Christmas winds are blowing most years. The book that FF mentioned is a good guide. Maybe we’ll hear from Scott on Sealife. He just came back from there.
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