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Old 10-28-2012, 07:09 PM   #41
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Ok then, what are the set ups usually one big block/2 small blocks....and are the motors american pushrod v8's bc if they are id be really comfortable with that area and could put it ay ease on the subject
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Old 10-28-2012, 08:51 PM   #42
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Very hard to find a trawler with gas motors what are some well built gas powered models??? Id prefer a chevy 454 lowered or dual 350 small blocks
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Old 10-28-2012, 09:31 PM   #43
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Tollycraft is a generally well built gasser. Like any other boat the previous owners attention to maintenance is what your buying.
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Old 10-28-2012, 09:38 PM   #44
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Why is it that I believe diesel engines are simpler than gasoline engines? Heavier and more costly than their gasoline cousins, yes.
I just believe they are a lot less likely to go "BANG!!"
I was involved in the aftermath of a gas engine boat explosion. It was truly awful and has burnt into memory.I know there are trouble free gas engine boats, but the possibility of gas fume build up in an enclosed bilge where you can get a spark, is a risk I avoid. BruceK
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Old 10-28-2012, 09:47 PM   #45
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Not really a risk as long as you keep it ventilated. Maybe even put a desktop mini fan down there. Im just more familiar with gas power.
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Old 10-29-2012, 01:53 AM   #46
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Not really a risk as long as you keep it ventilated. Maybe even put a desktop mini fan down there. Im just more familiar with gas power.
They are both internal combustion engines. Look for a 1 day diesel course.
Marine gas engines have specific non sparking alternators. Not sure about desk fan motors.No help blowing air around down there,you need air flow in and out to remove unwanted gases.
Gas from gasoline is heavier than air, it sinks low. The boat I know of had a safety "sniffer" which read "safe", a too rich and a too lean mixture can be "safe". They moved the boat on the auxiliary, air ventilated the bilge, they hit the starter for the main engine: "Gee,why am I 20ft in the air with debris being blasted into my flesh, my arms and legs are fractured,how come the baby`s dead,"etc.
Unlikely,but it does happen. Depends on your appetite for risk. BruceK
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Old 10-29-2012, 02:10 AM   #47
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I've seen a fire on a gas boat (twin engine Bayliner). Destroyed that boat plus the two on either side of it and fairly severely burned the owner. I know these incidents are rare but boat fires never happen until they happen. A diesel boat eliminates most if not all of that particular risk.

As far as maintenance goes we've had our boat fourteen years so far and use it year round. We have never had to deal with points, plugs, rotors, or caps. In fourteen years we've changed the raw water pumps once, the coolant/alternator belts twice, and had the valves adjusted. Other than that it's just been oil and filter changes and two coolant changes.

Now, we have had the exhaust elbows and riser mufflers changed and the engines needed new mounts a number of years ago, but these are issues common to all marine engines, gas or diesel.
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Old 10-29-2012, 02:38 AM   #48
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Love the hearty rumble of a JD diesel. Sounds like a boat should; not like an automobile.
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Old 10-29-2012, 07:00 AM   #49
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Very hard to find a trawler with gas motors what are some well built gas powered models?

"Trawler" in most cases is a style of deck house , a boat built as a cruiser need not look like a "trawler".

To get started read this,

Yacht Survey Online: David Pascoe, Marine Surveyor

www.yachtsurvey.com/

Then decide what shape boat you want.
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Old 10-29-2012, 07:11 AM   #50
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Im sure i wont have a problem running plumbing for a good ventilation set up. Although like you stated it does happen im not worried about explosion. Not only will it be proper ventilated, but ill make sure the tanks are either stripped and repainted, or just plain replaced along with any lines or fittings that look older. I wont be tugging anybody or doing an real heavy loads so im going to be more ova put put kinda gentlemen. Herd that diesels dont like that. I know gas do, and i know pushrod american v8s love to maintain slow and steady. Maint. Is cheaper. And when it comes to the work i can do it myself. I jus feel more comfortable with gas.
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Old 10-29-2012, 08:14 AM   #51
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I can't speak for anyone but myself.... My diesels "cruise" at 7 to 8 knots at about 1650 to 1700 rpm..... They idle at 750 to 800.... Trawlers "putt putt" along....

Any boat you buy....unless it is a gutted hull, should already have a proper engine room ventilation system and a flame arresting metal filter on each carb. Everything in the engine room will have to be "ignition protected"....which means no fans, etc from Wallyworld.... No alternators, etc....from NAPA or Pep Boys...unless they are marine certified.

Since you are considering a gas boat...and it will be an older one...make sure you get a good surveyor do inspect the boat before purchase.
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Old 10-29-2012, 08:27 AM   #52
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Do you have any problems with extended cruising in an underloaded diesel??
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Old 10-29-2012, 08:57 AM   #53
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Do you have any problems with extended cruising in an underloaded diesel??
You are just a can-of-worms-opening-machine, aren't you?

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Old 10-29-2012, 09:29 AM   #54
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hahaha gonzo, like i said buddy im new to this scenery. I made this thread so i can frequently visit it if i cant remeber something or somebody said something good or bad about such and such, itll be right here. That being said i just looked up some myths online and one of them stated that diesel motors usually have to be overhauled close to the same time as gas, then proceeded to put up pics of documented hours and motors one being a mercruiser 7.4 and the other being a cat diesel, diesel had 1100 hours on it and gas had 900 gas rebuild was 3500 and the diesel was 8400....pheeew ill take the gas. lol
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Old 10-29-2012, 01:48 PM   #55
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Do you have any problems with extended cruising in an underloaded diesel??
The max rated hp/rpm for a Ford Lehman 120 is 120@2500. Most of us with these engines cruise them between 1500 and 1800 rpm. By some measurements and by some people this could be considered "underloaded."

I'm not going to go into the history of the Ford Dorset/FL120 diesel here and why it's an engine that does not like to be run hard, but to answer your specific question about problems with extended cruising, our boat and its engines were built in 1973. Fourteen years after we bought the boat in 1998 the engines smoke no more today than they did then (at startup only), they use no more oil than they did then (a quart or less per engine every 100-150 hours), and they start immediately.

This could all end tomorrow, of course, but given their reputation in this kind of service they should keep going and going and going like the Energizer bunny.
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Old 10-29-2012, 02:08 PM   #56
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I really really like the tolly series setups. Ive not narrowed it to these atleast
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Old 10-29-2012, 02:09 PM   #57
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"Got it narrowed to those i ment"
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Old 10-29-2012, 04:14 PM   #58
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Do you have any problems with extended cruising in an underloaded diesel??
No, not a problem. But the Diesel is not really "underloaded". As the boat is a full displacement hull shape...and its top speed is determined by the length of its waterline....and my top speed regardless of engine RPM is about 9.5 knots or so... She will move along at 7 to 7.5 knots at 1650 rpm for days on end without problem. Bumping the rpm's much higher ...just really decreases the fuel efficiency and makes more noise....

Here's an article you might find interesting regarding the subject:

Displacement boats versus planing boats – MK Boat Designs

By the way...both of my Perkins diesels are the original powerplants in our boat that was built in 1979....and both engines have over 7000 hrs on them, and still going strong.
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Old 10-29-2012, 09:16 PM   #59
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Thank you
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Old 10-30-2012, 06:43 AM   #60
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Im sure i wont have a problem running plumbing for a good ventilation set up.

The folks that created the gas boat took care of the USCG vent requirements, all you need to do is check & maintain the system.

Diesel boats do not require by law much in the way of ventilation , so will be the most likely to suffer over warm engine spaces and unvented engine smells.
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