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Old 10-27-2012, 09:56 PM   #21
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Nobody has addressed it yet but you really, really need to start learning about boating, boat handling, safety and the "rules of the road" for boating. Having some level of mechanical ability is a great plus for you but being an auto mechanic is still a lot different then understanding marine electronics or onboard sewage waste systems. Handling a 30 or 40 foot boat is not the same as driving a car. Installing a GPS and getting it to talk to a navigation program isn't the same skill set as setting the valves on a gas fueled V8.

I would suggest you start reading about boating, buy a book called "Chapman Piloting and Seamanship" and read it cover to cover. Then start looking around for a United States Power Squadron or Coast Guard Auxilliary basic boating class. Take the class, ask a lot of questions and listen to the instructors. Then maybe join either the local Power Squadron or the Auxilliary and start learning from the other members, ask for rides and volunteer to help with their boats and their project.

Most of the contributing members of this forum have had years of experience handling and maintaining their boats. They have lots of knowledge to contribute to you. But before you buy something or try to charter a vessel for a week (which is going to cost a couple of thousand bucks/week) you need to start the studying and learning the fundamentals.

Not meant as a put down, just some suggestions. Hope you thoroughly enjoy the adventure.
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Old 10-27-2012, 10:05 PM   #22
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Nobody has addressed it yet but you really, really need to start learning about boating, boat handling, safety and the "rules of the road" for boating.
Justin--- At the stage you're at in boating that is probably the best advice you could get at this point and I would strongly suggest that you act on that advice. While operating a boat is not rocket science it has a lot of very unique aspects that are not necessarily intuitive. And--- like flying a plane--- when bad things happen they often happen fast. Your only defense is knowledge and experience. Experience comes with time but knowledge is something you can start getting right away per Steppen's suggestions.
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Old 10-27-2012, 10:47 PM   #23
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I am new here and new to trawlers so take this with a grain of salt. I just went through what you are talking about. I wrote a short mission statement for the boat and that helped clarify things. In short I will be doing the great loop and Bahamas. This boat will never do blue water cruising.

The conclusion I came to is that the Tiwaneese trawlers from the late 70's to the mid 80's can offer great bang for the buck. And there is no shortage of them in your price range. Florida seems to have the best prices. Be patient, when you find one, get a good surveyer and spend the day with him going over the boat.

The folks on this site are a great wealth of information.

Best of luck!

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Old 10-28-2012, 12:01 AM   #24
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Found a 78 tollycraft for 34,500. Nice setup. Yes i know i need some boating experience. That will come with time. Im not planning on making this big leap this yr or maybe even next year. So i plan on preparing from now untill then. Kinda looking at what is going to fit me so i can researxh that particular model. Get to know it inside and out, plumbing, electrical how much weight pushes me how far down so i know in shallow areas exactly how far down im hanging. Maybe a cpl visits down there walk the docks get use to the scenery/how things roll. Im beyond excited i know its going to be a little bit longer. And that sucks, but patients isent my thing, im forcing myself to hold back save money so when i finally shift finacially i will have no worries. So yes your advice is noted and i will get some prior experience before this. Im 24 but i was a cocky teenager once and know that in a 35 ft boat being cocky just isent going to work, if not injured or killed.
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Old 10-28-2012, 12:14 AM   #25
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Just found a 79 mainship and the set up is nice too 160 horse diesel. Not is this too old or as long as i have it surveyed it should be alright?? Anything in particular of the older models that isent at least "good".
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Old 10-28-2012, 12:47 AM   #26
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One of our several,true local trawlers: here pulling a net to catch fish bait.



Recreational trawlers are supposed to be fuel-efficient because they aren't intended to exceed hull-speed, something like 1.3 times the square root of the waterline. Nevertheless, forum participants here have boats with accommodations for cruising several days and more, whether they can or cannot exceed hull speed. That's our family.
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Old 10-28-2012, 08:03 AM   #27
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Seen a boat for sale that stated " trawler/tugboat. Is this what a true trawler is a working boat with sleeping arrangments?? I mean true meaning?
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Old 10-28-2012, 08:50 AM   #28
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You will get far more boat at a modest price if you will accept a boat with gasoline engines.

The ego nonsense of the diesel folks adds $20K to the price for no reason.

The "extra" in fuel will easily be made up in reduced maint costs and simplicity of service.

I would look at the Uniflite 36 to see what can be done with a well made solid GRP vessel ,($20K) and avoid the frequent deck and pilot house rebuilds of an old TT.

The Hatteris 40 does have a diesel, and is also a solid boat , but will run almost $40K.
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Old 10-28-2012, 09:43 AM   #29
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Thanks ff i appreciate that. Gasoline engines are my thing anyway. Havent delt much with diesels. And if one needed to be rebuilt i could do it myself. Going to check on the boats you speak of here in a min.
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Old 10-28-2012, 12:41 PM   #30
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If you go with gas engines....make sure they are "fresh water cooled" and not "raw water cooled".... Really big difference in annual/bi-annual maintenance costs in salt water.....

Last gas bought I had...I sold in 1994. Had a 454ci with Bravo 2...28' flybridge....on a good day fuel mileage was about 30 gallons per hour...depending on speed. That was back when gas was $1.40 a gallon for premium in a marina.

FF is right...you can get more boat for less $$ if it has a gas engine or engines....

Just make darn sure that the engines, fuel tanks, fuel lines, engine room blowers and all else are in excellent shape.....
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Old 10-28-2012, 01:11 PM   #31
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As an american muscle kind of person i could only imagine a nice soundin 454 behind ya would be like but at 30gph is the only thing that is shootin a red flag for me im torn between the two now just have to do some more research.
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Old 10-28-2012, 01:29 PM   #32
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It all depends on the speed you want to go.....

The 454ci boat would do 28-30 knots, at about 1 mpg....hence 30 gph. That boat weighed less than 4000 lbs....

Our diesel boat....you get a "nosebleed" if it hits 9 knots (LOL!) but it only uses 4 gph. This boat weighs roughly 50,000 lbs fully loaded.

Most marinas I have been to in FL.....charge more for gas than diesel as well.

What you would have to decide....is how long would it take you to burn the savings on gas engines over the diesels versus the price of a diesel boat?
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Old 10-28-2012, 02:00 PM   #33
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Like i said before diesel is more where im leaning towards. The fuel efficiency is a lot better. But the simplicity of gas is also hard to turn my head to. Think ive summed it up to a few. Either direction.
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Old 10-28-2012, 02:05 PM   #34
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Mainship and uniflight
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Old 10-28-2012, 02:07 PM   #35
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... But the simplicity of gas is also hard to turn my head to. ...
Why is it that I believe diesel engines are simpler than gasoline engines? Heavier and more costly than their gasoline cousins, yes.
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Old 10-28-2012, 02:34 PM   #36
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I dunno bc to me their not lol, that and i have abs. No backround in diesel
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Old 10-28-2012, 02:51 PM   #37
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I dunno bc to me their not lol, that and i have abs. No backround in diesel
I didn't either. When I was having the boat surveyed I told the mechanic I had zero experience with diesels. But that I had managed to keep a number of POS cars running over the years. He said that if I can do that I'd have no trouble with diesels. 5 years in, that's proven to be correct.
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Old 10-28-2012, 03:36 PM   #38
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Glad to hear baltimore!!!! Thats a little bit of reassurance!!!
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Old 10-28-2012, 03:39 PM   #39
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Do these bigger boats require a certain license?
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Old 10-28-2012, 05:34 PM   #40
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"diesel is more where im leaning towards. The fuel efficiency is a lot better."

Cruising speed is about the square root of the waterline length, so about 6K for a 35-40ft boat .

A diesel that will push a boat up on the plane at 30K will be 350=400HP and will indeed suck fuel at a wallet busting rate.

Get down to 6K and you will only need 35-50 hp at the most.
A gal of diesel fuel will create about 15 hp when operated slow (inefficient) the gal of gas will create 10+ hp most times.

A 400hp diesel dies rapidly from a large number of causes when run at 1/10 of its rating , and burns way more fuel than it should.

Gasoline does not suffer from this hassle , so the 440 Chrysler or whatever will be not dieing a rapid death from underloading.

At 30 -45 HP it takes a long time to pay for a diesel tune up, compared to a gas one.

A new gas crate engine can be had for 1/6 - 1/10 the price of a diesel.

Spark plugs are $3.00 each injectors run $75 for a rebuild to over $1,000 each new , depending on the engine.

6 quarts if oil? ,,,,6 Gal of diesel rated oil? $5.00 filter / $35.00 filter?

If you were a commercial operator and ran thousands of hours a year a diesel of proper size , well loaded would be first choice.

Most rec boats seldom see 200 hours a year .

The cost of boat ownership is what is known as the round trip.

Initial cost , repairs, operation expense , up keep (like PM) , deducted from sales price at the end.

Usually gas will be far less expensive (if all the required maint is carried out) than a diesel boat with its diesel required maint.

AS diesel maint is expensive , many owners do not bother to follow "Da Book".You get to pay for what they saved on as later owner.

Bigger boats , no big deal, only carrying over 6 passengers for hire is a big deal.
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