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Old 04-10-2013, 03:50 AM   #61
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Adlard Coles, born 1901, was a famous English blue water racing sailor, I have his 1981autobiography( Sailing Years- K Adlard Coles). He got into in publishing after WW2. Doubtless someone else took over updating the radar book, there would be one or two changes since he lost his grip of the tiller.
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Old 04-10-2013, 10:46 PM   #62
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Awesome info! Thanks for all the leads. I've pretty much exhausted the available Fly Fishing books. This will give Me something new to read.


My next question.......What are some of the things to consider(pro or con) when looking at saltwater boats, as compared to Fresh water?

Thanks.
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Old 04-10-2013, 11:18 PM   #63
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My next question.......What are some of the things to consider(pro or con) when looking at saltwater boats, as compared to Fresh water?

Thanks.
For boats used in saltwater you will want a freshwater (aka coolant) cooled engine. As opposed to a raw water (aka the water the boat's sitting in) cooled engine.

This is one reason why the diesels in so many of our boats last so long. The coolant circulating in the engine is proper coolant, like your car. So it fights corrosion and does a bunch of other things, all of them good.

The raw water (saltwater) never gets anywhere near the inside of the engine at all.

A raw water cooled engine in saltwater (like most outboards) is susceptible to corrosion and gradual interior deterioration unless it is religiously flushed out with fresh water. Easy to do with an outboard, not so much with a marine diesel.

Since there is no airflow in the engine room a radiator's not going to do much good so heat exhangers are used instead. Raw water is taken in with a pump mounted on the engine and passed through the heat exhanger. The engine's coolant is also passed through the heat exchanger in its own set of tubes and the result is the raw water absorbs the excess heat from the coolant.

There are three basic methods used for a closed or fresh water (coolant) engine cooling system. One is to pump raw water through a heat exchanger as described and then dump the now-hot raw water into the exhaust where it can be blown out of the boat by the exhaust. This is the most common system used in recreational boats.

The second is with a so-called dry-stack exhaust system which still uses a heat exchanger but the water exiting the exchanger is simply dumped overboard, usually out of the side of the boat in the vicinity of the engine room. The exhaust has no water injected into it at all. Lots of commercial fishboats are like this with their dry exhaust outlets up above the boat.

The third way is called keel cooling. The nice thing about this is there is no raw water pump or internal heat exchanger system at all. The engine coolant is circulated through a multi-folded tube that is mounted on the exterior bottom of the hull, either in a recess for this purpose or in some other way so it is not easily susceptible to damage.

So it's still a heat exchanger but in this case the raw water is the water the boat is moving through, not raw water being pumped up into the engine room. The exhaust in this case can be a dry-stack or in some setups there is still a raw water pump but its sole purpose is to pump cooling water into the exhaust. This last seems a little self-defeating since the great thing about keel cooling is you don't need a raw water pump and plumbing but you've put them on anyway to cool the exhaust.

You also want to make sure the boat has a bonding system that is designed for saltwater. This has more to do with the type of anodes are mounted on the hull, rudder, etc. than with the internal bonding wiring itself but it's not a subject I know much about other than what kind of anodes our boat needs.
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Old 04-10-2013, 11:54 PM   #64
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Bob, Those three examples of Bayliners are jewels! Were they in our part of the country at those prices, would be snapped up Johnny Quick Time!!

I agree with those thoughts that knowing the basic day to day servicing of a diesel engine with time used, will give you continued building comfort for boating. I have not read any post that suggest that you include a specific inspection by a qualified diesel doctor above and beyond the usual boat surveyor unless that surveyor is qualified. It has been a comfort to us in our boat purchases to have a specific inspection. As to daily process of maintenance, you should take notes from the seller as to what and where everything is located. Keep his number on speed dial for the first six months. Owners that I have dealt with have been fair and Johnny on the Rat hole, with assistance.
Good luck, finding the perfect boat is a life long quest. Take your time and as hard as it is, don't let your heart override your brain on the final decision.
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Old 04-24-2013, 05:28 PM   #65
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Well, I went and casted Flies for Steelhead yesterday. After 4 hours of nothingness, I went downstream to the lake and hit a few boatyards. No luck finding my dream trawler, but it was nice to get down there and look at a few. Did see a pretty nice Mainship, unfortunately it wasn't wearing a "for sale" sign.

Fun to go look though.
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Old 05-04-2013, 02:01 PM   #66
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I have seen a lot of chatter on this site and others about the problems with getting larger boats in and out of marinas on lake Erie. Does anybody have experience with Marinas on Lake Erie, specifically between Detroit and Cleveland. When We finally purchase a boat, We will have to have it based somewhere between to fully enjoy it.
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Old 05-05-2013, 11:54 AM   #67
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Lake Erie this year will be lower than average. Try this chart
Tides Currents and Water Levels
The way I read it is that we are starting about 16 inches lower so even in the best case, with an awful lot of rain we probably cannot reach the historical mean. All things being equal we likely will be a foot or so below last year but three critical elements need to be considered.

1) upstream of Detroit River are the very big lakes Huron and Michigan which feed into Erie. They are in terrible shape and it will take much more to raise them.

2) The levels have a lot of historic flex over the boating season starting high and ending low. Some places which would be good in June are hopeless by late August. So if things were bad last August expect worse this year.

3) Local conditions especially for the western portion of Erie change a lot with the wind. You can easily get a swing of more than a foot with a stiff westerly ( which is the most common direction ) If this happens in August this year, which it will, I can point to marinas that will have many boats sitting in mud.

Having said all that, you can still have a lot of boating by sticking to decent depths and channels. You can also pick carefully which marinas are dredged deeper and which have decent entrance channels. You can also pick when you come and go. Not a perfect situation but paying attention you will be OK and well ahead of others who don't. BTW - Buy some tow boat insurance.
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Old 07-06-2013, 06:15 PM   #68
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What are the laws concerning anchoring for extended periods? Both on the GL's and on the ocean coast.
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Old 07-07-2013, 05:43 AM   #69
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Sadly the USCG has given up most of the responsibility in anchoring.

Sure you will still see "special anchorage " on some charts ,(means no anchor light required) , but that's about it.

IF the boat is "navigating",, operating anchoring out of a fairway is about the only legal requirement.

As expected many local govs have decided with the withdrawal of the USCG they now own/control all the water they can see from their shore , and claim to be able to restrict anchoring or charge for it.

IN some states like FL the State gov has made explicit laws to restrict the locals power grab , but sadly not all states.
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Old 07-07-2013, 10:40 AM   #70
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I have seen a lot of chatter on this site and others about the problems with getting larger boats in and out of marinas on lake Erie. Does anybody have experience with Marinas on Lake Erie, specifically between Detroit and Cleveland. When We finally purchase a boat, We will have to have it based somewhere between to fully enjoy it.
Plenty of water here at Anchor Pointe this year for the big boys and the sailboats... as long as the wind doesn't blow out of the west hard for several days. It's also one of the cheaper places to dock, and very DIY friendly.
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Old 07-07-2013, 11:34 PM   #71
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Plenty of water here at Anchor Pointe this year for the big boys and the sailboats... as long as the wind doesn't blow out of the west hard for several days. It's also one of the cheaper places to dock, and very DIY friendly.
Thanks Pal. Just looked at anchor Pt. on Google Earth. Quite a big place, and only an hour from my house. What do you mean by "DIY friendly"?
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