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Old 02-26-2014, 11:39 AM   #1
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New Nautical word

Scend: The heaving motion of a boat.

I was reading an article about the Detroit A vessel that made the trans Atlantic crossing in 1912. Just a few ex certs from the log. they used this term I had to look it up.

Anyone have anymore archaic Nautical terms

SD
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Old 02-26-2014, 11:42 AM   #2
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Scend: The heaving motion of a boat.

I was reading an article about the Detroit A vessel that made the trans Atlantic crossing in 1912. Just a few ex certs from the log. they used this term I had to look it up.

Anyone have anymore archaic Nautical terms

SD
Not off the top of my head. But Patrick O'Brien's Aubry/Maturin series are chock full of nautical trivia.
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Old 02-26-2014, 12:04 PM   #3
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Old 02-26-2014, 12:13 PM   #4
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Here's one that was new to me- 'Careen'.
They would run the ship into the shallows and when the tide went out, it would roll to one side or the other to enable cleaning or repairs to one side of the hull.
Suitable spots to do this were called careenages.
I first heard of this reading "Shogun", a terrific novel by the way.
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Old 02-26-2014, 12:19 PM   #5
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Greetings,
Mr. SD. Good to see you posting. I missed your reports from "away". Archaic terms. FIRST one that that springs to mind is saloon. Seems it's been replaced by beauty parlor lingo (salon). She's got me some drove b'y.
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Old 02-26-2014, 12:36 PM   #6
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Here's one that was new to me- 'Careen'.
They would run the ship into the shallows and when the tide went out, it would roll to one side or the other to enable cleaning or repairs to one side of the hull.
Suitable spots to do this were called careenages.
I first heard of this reading "Shogun", a terrific novel by the way.
I have done this with my boat several times. Just to check the bottom and prop.

Good word but I keep thinking of a glancing blow.

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Old 02-26-2014, 04:41 PM   #7
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To me, one term that has become archaic and shouldn't be is 'pitching.' I read on this forum and others the term 'hobby-horsing.' Seriously, hobby horsing? Pitching is the proper term for that motion of a boat. Totally annoying. Rant over.
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Old 02-26-2014, 04:49 PM   #8
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Old 02-26-2014, 04:51 PM   #9
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Quote:
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Here's one that was new to me- 'Careen'.
They would run the ship into the shallows and when the tide went out, it would roll to one side or the other to enable cleaning or repairs to one side of the hull.
Suitable spots to do this were called careenages.
I first heard of this reading "Shogun", a terrific novel by the way.
how abut stemming the current???
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Old 02-26-2014, 05:17 PM   #10
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A phrase, rather than a word. But interesting. "Blow your stack" -- blow compressed air up stacks to clear out the soot. Expression in the old Navy. They would blow their stack(s) before, for example, a naval battle.
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Old 02-26-2014, 05:32 PM   #11
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Old 02-26-2014, 05:34 PM   #12
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Good to see you on line SD

I've no old nautical word to add just now... thought I'd say howdy to you... and, get in this interesting thread to read words/terms as they're offered. I recall any and I'll post it. To busy to think much about it right now. Cheers! Art
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Old 02-26-2014, 06:02 PM   #13
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Here's one that was new to me- 'Careen'.
They would run the ship into the shallows and when the tide went out, it would roll to one side or the other to enable cleaning or repairs to one side of the hull...
Sydney Harbour has a small bay called "Careening Cove", used in early times as described, though a boat might sit upright rather than roll either side.
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Old 02-26-2014, 06:18 PM   #14
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Sydney Harbour has a small bay called "Careening Cove", used in early times as described, though a boat might sit upright rather than roll either side.
Saw a sailboat careened at Beaufort, N.C., across from the main drag, next to the island, with two guys busily scrubbing the hull with long-handled brushes. Was flying an English flag, with the U.S. courtesy flag on the main shrouds, so guess they were following the ancient mores. :-)
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Old 02-27-2014, 05:51 AM   #15
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In places with almost no tide the vessel would simply be lightened by taking stores to shore and then heeled by blocks to the shore .

Sometimes all the guns would be lifted ashore to lighten the hull and get it higher.

A load of work , but a fighting ship with a 3 year foot long beard is pretty unhandy.
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Old 02-27-2014, 07:49 AM   #16
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"Blow your stack" -- blow compressed air up stacks to clear out the soot.
It isn't air that is used on marine boilers, it is steam. Only a land based powerplant can afford the space and energy to use compressed air. The only thing a marine soot blower uses air for is the motor that rotates the lance. The soot blower lance and nozzles are located inside the boiler and aimed at the set of tubes they serve. At least once a day the soot blowers are used to "blow tubes" and remove accumulated soot that acts as an insulator and can create a fire hazard.

The soot blowers are fed by superheated steam (very hot and dry) in a sequence starting low and ending high. The forced draft fans are turned up to supply more air flow to carry off the dislodged soot and that is why it looks like the stack is "blowing."
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Old 02-27-2014, 08:05 AM   #17
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A good time not to be on deck in dress whites.
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Old 02-27-2014, 09:09 AM   #18
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I like my favorite weather term: "BLAMF". Blowing Like A Mother F-----
Unfortunately I see it far to often when I read my old logs.
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Old 02-27-2014, 09:12 AM   #19
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It isn't air that is used on marine boilers, it is steam.
Roger that. I stand corrected.
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Old 02-27-2014, 09:34 AM   #20
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A "Pig", while sometimes applying to shipmates, is normally a unit of weight applied to ballast. 1 pig = 56 lbs. I can only assume they had real scrawny pigs back in the day.
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