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Old 02-27-2014, 11:30 AM   #21
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In the 19th century when the Navy shanghaied lots of sailors, you didn't want to eat the 'long pork'.
(Don't ask, it's too creepy)
It just popped in my mind after I read dimer2's post about pigs.
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Old 02-27-2014, 12:33 PM   #22
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How about "ranging" your anchor chain? Defined as laying out, cleaning the chain and marking the lengths.
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Old 02-27-2014, 12:44 PM   #23
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hmason-when I was a kid, my Dad was the CO of the USMC Detachment at Pearl Harbor. The Marines were in charge of base security and the Brig. The chief way to keep the prisoners in the Brig occupied was cleaning, scraping and painting anchor chains. Used to see lengths of huge, really huge, anchor chain with guys working on it all day long. Not a great job.
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Old 02-27-2014, 01:35 PM   #24
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I'd rather peel potatoes.
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Old 02-27-2014, 01:58 PM   #25
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Ever heard of a deadhead.

I have seen them. It is a log floating straight up and down in the water. First one I saw I couldn't figure what the heck it was. A big dark object covered in barnacles popping up and down in the water. The thing was about 10 ft long must have weighed a ton. I called a security with the location.
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Old 02-27-2014, 02:12 PM   #26
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"Splicing the main brace"-Cocktail hour
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Old 02-27-2014, 02:20 PM   #27
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Ever heard of a deadhead.

I have seen them. It is a log floating straight up and down in the water. First one I saw I couldn't figure what the heck it was. A big dark object covered in barnacles popping up and down in the water. The thing was about 10 ft long must have weighed a ton. I called a security with the location.
One of the reasons I avoid night runs. The ones that scare me are those that aren't popping up and down in the water but are relatively unaffected by wave action. They're either very massive or anchored to the bottom.
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Old 02-27-2014, 02:43 PM   #28
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One of the reasons I avoid night runs. The ones that scare me are those that aren't popping up and down in the water but are relatively unaffected by wave action. They're either very massive or anchored to the bottom.
Agreed X 10! - Early 60's I was aboard a 38' +/- wood boat that "hit something" at late dusk off Montauk Point LI, NY. With boat moving at about 12 knots it put a fair crack in a plank about 4' back from bow on starboard side. We heard it hit and soon pulled enough plywood off bunks in the V to see water coming in. Luckily the old boat was made well from stout timbers. Crack was not too bad for the bilge pumps to handle. Traveling in dark can be dangerous. Avoiding items in water is one reason I like to pilot from flybridge. But even from there in dark a boat could hit something that in the light might be avoided.
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Old 02-27-2014, 03:02 PM   #29
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It isn't air that is used on marine boilers, it is steam. Only a land based powerplant can afford the space and energy to use compressed air. The only thing a marine soot blower uses air for is the motor that rotates the lance. The soot blower lance and nozzles are located inside the boiler and aimed at the set of tubes they serve. At least once a day the soot blowers are used to "blow tubes" and remove accumulated soot that acts as an insulator and can create a fire hazard.
On oil-fired steam locomotives, the fireman would hold a shovel of sand beside the front of the firebox. The draft would pull the sand in to be blown through the fire tubes to scrub them.

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Old 02-27-2014, 03:32 PM   #30
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I Still use the term "blowing a gagger"
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Old 02-27-2014, 03:46 PM   #31
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To me, one term that has become archaic and shouldn't be is 'pitching.' I read on this forum and others the term 'hobby-horsing.' Seriously, hobby horsing?

Considering it is one of the 6 degrees of a vessel's motion, it is hard to believe the term pitching is considered archaic. It is among the most commonly used terms to describe vessel motion in response to seas. I can't think of many discussions among boat people where the term has not been used.

"Hobby horsing" is well and truly an amateur way of describing pitching ... it is kind of embarrassing to see it used on a boating forum.
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Old 02-27-2014, 03:50 PM   #32
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I Still use the term "blowing a gagger"
Hmmmmm that kind of sounds like a lifestyle thing of the sort that disturbs the folks in Kansas.
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Old 02-27-2014, 03:54 PM   #33
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Greetings,
Hey, keep Ron Jeremy out of this....Just to take the wind out of your sails.....
The Dictionary of English Nautical Language, Glossary and Terms directory.
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Old 02-27-2014, 04:01 PM   #34
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Considering it is one of the 6 degrees of a vessel's motion...

Pitch, roll, yaw.

What are the other three?
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Old 02-27-2014, 04:09 PM   #35
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I Still use the term "blowing a gagger"
Definitely a Canadian thing..
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Old 02-27-2014, 04:11 PM   #36
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SHOT--a length of chain rode 15 fathoms in length.
LEAGUE--distance a man walking briskly can cover in 1 hour (in English-speaking countries it is taken to mean just under 4 statute miles).
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Old 02-27-2014, 04:15 PM   #37
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Greetings,
Mr. m. "What are the other three?"...
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Old 02-27-2014, 04:36 PM   #38
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Have you ever painted an eyebrow?
EYEBROW=The protrusion above the upper half of the exterior side of a Porthole.
USE=to divert water that is moving down a vertical bulkhead in which a port light is found.

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Old 02-27-2014, 04:55 PM   #39
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Sometimes I think it's a regular zoo out there.....

Monkey fists, Pelican hooks, Camels, Donkey boilers / engines, Birdseye's, Dog watches, Cat paws, Goat lockers, Goose necks, Snakes, Monkey Sh*t, and on and on.
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Old 02-27-2014, 06:11 PM   #40
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Quote:
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Pitch, roll, yaw.

What are the other three?
I know that "heave" on a USCG icebreaker is appropriately termed....

sway and surge are 2 more but I swear I've heard different terms (not quite as exotic as hobby-horse) but I'll have to think some more.)..
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