Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-27-2015, 04:00 AM   #41
Veteran Member
 
Dubnuh's Avatar
 
City: Beijing, PRC
Country: China
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by eyschulman View Post
This post and the comments sort of reminds me of the situation where a guy would be fool enough to get on the net and ask for a critique of his prospective bride. Personally I choose my woman and boats and don't give a dame what others think. Cant imagine choosing a woman or boat by committee.
Well spoken 😀
It's great to hear pros and cons on boats though. forum comments on my wife, not so much.
__________________
Advertisement

Dubnuh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2015, 12:25 PM   #42
Veteran Member
 
PenBayCruiser's Avatar
 
City: Camden
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Spindrift
Vessel Model: Lehtinen/Sawyer
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 40
Nice boat, I like the layout. I agree that the wood work is unimaginative and the little table in the pilothouse could go (and maybe it's removable). I also would not want the gate valves, should be ball valves.

She'd be a hard to transport to my winter storage, 7 miles inland.
__________________

PenBayCruiser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2015, 12:54 PM   #43
TF Site Team
 
ksanders's Avatar
 
City: SEWARD ALASKA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: LISAS WAY
Vessel Model: BAYLINER 4788
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,956
Quote:
Originally Posted by eyschulman View Post
This post and the comments sort of reminds me of the situation where a guy would be fool enough to get on the net and ask for a critique of his prospective bride. Personally I choose my woman and boats and don't give a dame what others think. Cant imagine choosing a woman or boat by committee.
I would not feel too badly about the comments. I think that the comments are about what you'd expect from a bunch of intellegent guys analyzing a boat... Especially a boat with a different than "normal" design.

If you think about it, there are not all that many layout level design choices that can be made in a 50' pilothouse boat. The functional areas, IE galley, salon, pilothouse, cabins, heads, and equipment spaces all need to exist. The cubic area to work with is set by generally accepted length to beam, to height paramaters.

The designer gets to choose where to put the major functional areas, and what size they are, but the choices are much more limited than many people realize.

So, this designer chose to put the galley aft. There are good things about that choice, and there are not so good things, as the many thought provoking posts in this thread indicate.
__________________
Kevin Sanders
Bayliner 4788
Seward, Alaska
www.mvlisasway.com
ksanders is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2015, 01:33 PM   #44
Guru
 
Tad Roberts's Avatar
 
City: Flattop Islands
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Blackfish
Vessel Model: custom
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 707
I certainly did not mean to imply that this boat would not appeal hugely to many folks, I only stated it does not appeal to me. I always learn something from these, "What do you think of ...." threads. Sometimes the features people like are surprising, sometimes the concerns are educational.

That said upon reflection and after being told I shouldn't "attack" other designer's work, I found a couple of positive features on this boat to mention. The first is the real watertight doors dividing up the lower deck. I'm assuming that real doors means real watertight divisions. This boat appears to be divided into 5 compartments. That ensures that should one of those compartments flood, the ship will not sink. Of course this requires the WT door be shut at all times when underway.

Proper deadlights over the lower deck ports are unusual these days, nice to have in that ultimate storm.

And the big lazzeret hatch (properly watertight and dogged down) is something to be encouraged. Though in this case it looks a bit awkward to use and could be a hazard when open.
Tad Roberts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2015, 01:34 PM   #45
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,985
Quote:
Originally Posted by PenBayCruiser View Post
Nice boat, I like the layout. I agree that the wood work is unimaginative and the little table in the pilothouse could go (and maybe it's removable). I also would not want the gate valves, should be ball valves.

She'd be a hard to transport to my winter storage, 7 miles inland.
Hi PBC - That shore line of Sherman Point in your avatar? I know Camden and the area pretty well form late 60's into mid 70's. - Art


PS: Nice looking Penobscot cruiser you have there!
Art is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2015, 02:03 PM   #46
Senior Member
 
tegdesign's Avatar
 
City: Seattle
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Nordvind
Vessel Model: Nova Heritage 36
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by eyschulman View Post
This post and the comments sort of reminds me of the situation where a guy would be fool enough to get on the net and ask for a critique of his prospective bride. Personally I choose my woman and boats and don't give a dame what others think. Cant imagine choosing a woman or boat by committee.
True to a point. There are a lot of aspects of boats which are subjective and open to opinion (not everything) and those variables are interesting to discuss unless one is feeling a bit sensitive.
__________________
Nordvind | 1987 36' Nova | Volvo TMD41A
tegdesign is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2015, 02:13 PM   #47
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tad Roberts View Post
This boat appears to be divided into 5 compartments. That ensures that should one of those compartments flood, the ship will not sink. Of course this requires the WT door be shut at all times when underway.
.
That last sentence reminded me of the old report on the Broward Marine Fire. They built a firewall between two buildings. However, in the upper area of the firewall they left windows which opened out over the roof of the second building.

Safety features are only as good as the users are.
BandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2015, 02:29 PM   #48
Senior Member
 
City: SanFran
Country: USA
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dubnuh View Post
The kitchen is directly at the entrance from the cockpit. Everyone seems to have the same layout in the boats I'm looking at, and then I find this Nova Scotian built beauty.
Why do you like the kitchen at the rear? I'm just curious as to what people see as the pros and cons of the having the kitchen aft, vs. up front.
LRC58Fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2015, 03:11 PM   #49
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,922
Like most vessels...depending on how you use it and in what climes....certain features are desireable over others and if both necessary demand more space or top location.

I like the galley aft in this design but not in all designs.

If entertaining outside it's convenient, if entertaining inside it's convenient. At anchor, hopefully any galley heat/smoke would be carried outside.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2015, 03:34 PM   #50
Guru
 
Codger2's Avatar
 
City: San Diego
Country: US
Vessel Name: "Sandpiper"
Vessel Model: 2006 42' Ocean Alexander Sedan
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,421
Quote:
Originally Posted by LRC58Fan View Post
Why do you like the kitchen at the rear? I'm just curious as to what people see as the pros and cons of the having the kitchen aft, vs. up front.
A lot of sport fishers Have been doing this for years. (Aft galley) Coupled with a day head in the cockpit, this keeps the traffic ("Fishy smell") to a minimum. Some day heads also incorporate showers.) Personally, I really like the aft galleys for several reasons. Pass through windows to the cockpit for entertaining, fishermen use, the cook can observe the swimming, diving, fishing activities, rod storage, less rocking while a meal is being prepared, etc.
__________________
Codger2

My passion for improving my boat(s) exceeds my desire to constantly cruise them.
Codger2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2015, 01:31 AM   #51
Veteran Member
 
Dubnuh's Avatar
 
City: Beijing, PRC
Country: China
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 89
I wonder what her depreciation will be in three years when I'm ready to make my move? I know, that's a possibly loaded question, but I'm just dreaming at this point

My favorite mooring in the VI; Leinster Bay
Dubnuh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2015, 03:12 PM   #52
Guru
 
Xsbank's Avatar
 
City: Pender Harbour, BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Gwaii Haanas
Vessel Model: Vancouver Shipyards Custom Aluminum 52
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 2,447
Wheelhouse too far forward, eh?
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	image.jpg
Views:	107
Size:	69.8 KB
ID:	36979  
__________________
Don't believe everything that you think.
Xsbank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2015, 05:57 PM   #53
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,985
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xsbank View Post
Wheelhouse too far forward, eh?
Not forward enough in this weird a$$ design - I simply hate it when you can't see the bow from the helm with bare eyes... be there view screen(s) on console or not!

Art is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2015, 06:22 PM   #54
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Country: Bumpkin?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 9,997
Or blue...
__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2015, 06:39 PM   #55
Veteran Member
 
City: Baltic Sea
Country: North-Eastern Germany
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 36
A well done galley-aft-layout can be found on smaller vessels too: Dutch Steel Cruisers.
GeorgS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2015, 08:03 PM   #56
Guru
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 1,291
Aft galley to starboard works for us. View is through rear door. My previous production boat had a similar arrangement. Walk in the cabin and the sink on your right hand side. then counter space going forward. Before that I had two sail boats that had galley just as you entered the cabin so I have no idea what the aft galley problem is, actually for me a forward galley seems unusual all in the tint of the glasses you use to view it..
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	mr int.jpg
Views:	74
Size:	88.9 KB
ID:	36980  
eyschulman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2015, 05:58 AM   #57
Guru
 
Rustybarge's Avatar
 
City: I need a bigger boat!
Country: Ireland
Vessel Model: Cheetah 25' Powercat.
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 925
Quote:
Originally Posted by eyschulman View Post
Aft galley to starboard works for us. View is through rear door. My previous production boat had a similar arrangement. Walk in the cabin and the sink on your right hand side. then counter space going forward. Before that I had two sail boats that had galley just as you entered the cabin so I have no idea what the aft galley problem is, actually for me a forward galley seems unusual all in the tint of the glasses you use to view it..
You have one of the prettiest boats on the forum......
I've bought a lotto ticket.

Think of it this way: would you have your kitchen in the front hall of your house?
Or at the rear opening out onto the back yard where the kids can run around?
__________________
Peter.
Rustybarge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2015, 06:13 AM   #58
Veteran Member
 
Brian Harward's Avatar
 
City: Sydney
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Tranquility Base
Vessel Model: Kadey Krogen 48 North Sea
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 51
Almost as nice as my Kadey Krogen 😄
Brian Harward is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2015, 11:14 AM   #59
Guru
 
refugio's Avatar
 
City: Meydenbauer Bay Yacht Club
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Refugio
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 1,141
While the boat appears well built, there are some interesting design choices.

I'm not really seeing the handholds in the wide-open saloon - unless you're 6' tall and can use that one on the centerline ceiling. And I don't think I appreciate whatever they were trying to achieve with that (under-sized, note the bent stock) anchoring setup.

My problem with the galley location is the lack of visibility. If it's there because it's the place on the boat with least motion, then anyone there is likely to feel uncomfortable with not being able to see out either side. I can kind of accept that on the port side, but the starboard side (with what I first thought was a narrow on-deck head) has cupboards. Sorry, but I see this as an unnecessarily unpleasant space though it does have a hatch - and two large vents (note the huge mushroom on the boat deck).

And then there are the truly odd things - watertight door to the master stateroom? Batteries mounted horizontally for no apparent reason? Fake teak on the swim step but just painted non-skid everywhere else? Deadly looking hinged access from the pilothouse to the flybridge?

One thing I do appreciate (especially in Nova Scotia with their huge tidal range) is the ability to careen the boat.
refugio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2015, 03:15 PM   #60
Guru
 
City: Melbourne, FL
Country: USA
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 918
I've seen this boat twice and it is very sturdily built and the new paint job is far better than original. The food storage is limited for any long range cruising, since there are two drawers, and the fridge under the counter, and the added freezer in the lazarette.
There is a two burner stove in the kitchen, and a convection microwave. No oven. The "cabinets" on starboard side are not actually cabinets but pass-thru for the cooling ducts to the upper deck. No real usable storage there since they are filled with piping.

The engines are reasonable for this size of boat since any much more power would simply burn more fuel and not contribute much more speed. Not having turbos will lower your cost of operation and maintenance, and they will run longer.

The upper hatch sticks, but can be fixed easily. I would prefer the hatch reversed to the port side rather than have to go around it since it swings to the inside. It has a pneumatic lift but that makes the hatch tend to stick. I would prefer a counterweight instead of the lift, or as well as the lift cylinder. They use the boom to load and unload the tender (designed currently for Boston Whaler SS 130) and have two hydraulic winches to do the lifting, so there is no need for a davit crane.

If you notice the two vertical pipe pockets on the bow, that's where you can mount a small davit to retrieve an anchor (or other stuff) if you need.

The mast can be hydraulically laid back and has a cradle on the stern to hold it, for lower bridges. From what I see, it's under 18' from the waterline to the searchlight.

The lazarette hatch is oriented so it blocks passage on the cockpit, which is annoying. If it had been rotated so the open hatch would parallel the stern, it would have been more convenient.

It would have been nice to have a bit more room in the cockpit and the swim platform, but not at the expense of shortening the cabin space. A day head would be nice.

The ship seems to have been built as tough as a tank without some of the cute stuff some other vendors add. Call it spartan for sure but tough and no exposed teak to weather and require maintenance.

I am 6' 3" tall so there are some head bumping issues for me. With all the safety issues thought of in this boat, it seems like an oversight to not have an engine driven bilge pump, rather than an electric one. A fast flow bilge pump on the engine driveline would better secure survival if you can keep the engines running.

Stu
__________________

stubones99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012