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Old 10-22-2012, 03:30 PM   #21
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Marin - Sounds like you are ready for Round 2 of this game! I was planning on a Great Loop game with a more challenging budget requirement. Standby!

If you make it a separate thread it would be easier to follow.
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Old 10-22-2012, 03:48 PM   #22
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If you make it a separate thread it would be easier to follow.
That's the plan!
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Old 10-22-2012, 03:50 PM   #23
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Marin - Sounds like you are ready for Round 2 of this game! I was planning on a Great Loop game with a more challenging budget requirement. Standby!

BTW - The 777 is an excellent choice! Go Boeing!
The Great Loop is something I know zero, zip, nada about other than what it is. So I don't know what sort of requirements this largely river and lake journey imposes on a boat. Shallow draft maybe? Low clearance?

So I'll wait for the PNW version of the game.
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Old 10-22-2012, 07:46 PM   #24
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For me, the Diesel Duck is out because I would never buy a steel boat. So that leaves the Nordhavn 40 which has a proven long-distance record and excellent quality in its construction and systems..
For a world cruiser, I think a steel hull makes a lot of sense. They can be built strong, and if damaged can be repaired anyplace with steel plate and a welder. Cosmetics at that point are not important.

I also agree with Larry M that a 38 to 40 foot craft is a little small for comfort during a circumnavigation. A 46 or so Diesel Duck or Nordhavn should fill the bill quite well. I am assuming that we are limited to choosing displacement motor cruisers.
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Old 10-22-2012, 08:20 PM   #25
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THD

I assume you have done trans oceanic in your 58? Not too many have in their KKs. Tis a shame since that is their purpose, at least for those with twins or a get home. I'm sure you remember the N40 that did the round the world a decade or so ago. Lots of buzz could come KK's way by doing the same.

And your "obvious reasons" for not being a Nordhavn fan for this below $500 K question are ---? Since the N46 Egret has already easily done the ocean crossing task, I'm puzzled. The answer to Round 1 seems clear.
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Old 10-22-2012, 08:24 PM   #26
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For a world cruiser, I think a steel hull makes a lot of sense. They can be built strong, and if damaged can be repaired anyplace with steel plate and a welder.
All good points. My reason for never wanting a boat with a steel hull is that I know some people who have or have had boats with steel hulls and they had to spend an inordinate amount of time ensuring that the inside of the hull remained dry. From what I've been told by people with experience with steel-hulled vessels, the hulls die from the inside out, not the outside in.

So in my book, the more "inert" the hull material the better.
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Old 10-22-2012, 08:30 PM   #27
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For me, the Diesel Duck is out because I would never buy a steel boat. ...
That's because toy boats are usually made of plastic while "real" boats/ships are built of metal.

Granted, steel hulls need frequent attention to stay ahead of corrosion; but then there's no worry of core rot and blisters.

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Old 10-22-2012, 08:40 PM   #28
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That's because toy boats are usually made of plastic while "real" boats/ships are built of metal.
You need to let Nordhavn, Tony Fleming, and the boys down the road from our studios at Delta Yachts know that. They've been suffering under the apparent delusion that they've been making "real" boats. High time someone set them straight.

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Granted, steel hulls need frequent attention to stay ahead of corrosion; but then there's no worry of core rot and blisters.
True but I think there are potential problems with all hull materials. Poor grades of steel, poorly executed welds and so on can plague a steel structure as much as blisters and delamination can plague one made of fiberglass or composites. As to core rot, I agree with you there but my take on that is that a fiberglass hull shouldn't have a wood core, period. In my mind it defeats the whole notion of having a hull made of inert materials.
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Old 10-22-2012, 08:51 PM   #29
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Metal also make economic sense for one-off and semi-custom boats because the cost of molds of high-production plastic boats is avoided. But then if you want a boat that is like everyone else's ...
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Old 10-22-2012, 09:03 PM   #30
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This corrosion and its cause under my Coot's forward cabin due to the faulty design of the anchor locker drain allowing water to enter the hull above a speed of six knots, and possibly loose steel filings, have since been corrected.

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Old 10-22-2012, 09:12 PM   #31
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As a newbie, what or where is the Great Loop?

Thanks,

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Old 10-22-2012, 09:36 PM   #32
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As a newbie, what or where is the Great Loop?

Thanks,

Bill
A water route popular with some cruisers around the Eastern third of the United States.
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Old 10-22-2012, 09:39 PM   #33
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As a newbie, what or where is the Great Loop?

Thanks,

Bill
Here you go, Kwaj.

America's Great Loop Cruisers' Association
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Old 10-22-2012, 10:36 PM   #34
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Thanks guys, that would be fun for a year or so.

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Old 10-23-2012, 12:52 AM   #35
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The Nordhavn 46 has always been on my list as a proven short handed passagemaker, I have a friend who had one and has recently moved up to the N57 for more livability etc. They have their draw backs for sure... squatty engine room, less interior space than other 45/46 more coastal boats, high cost.. to name a few. As far as fuel add a bladder for the really long passages and transfer fuel as soon as you can get it in the tanks, the flip side to the smaller tanks are you don't have either a huge amount of fuel that you need to use if you don't do really long voyages often ( like a pacific crossing ) or a hull full of half empty tanks. They are set up to take heavier weather than the smaller Krogens and some of the other " trawlers" (not bashing Krogens.. they are a great boat and i really like them too) .

As far as the D. Ducks are concerned beauty must be in the eye of the beholder, I don't care for the looks at all.. and the livability doesn't seem right...too much like a lot of sail boats.. a cave. I spent some time aboard the D. Duck that I think is the best example ( 10&2 built locally ) and the boat would not be great at anchor... but if you just wanted to circumnavigate fast it would be fantastic. It was built to perfection ( not a Chinese built one.... we had a local one of those and in a short time rust was bleeding through the paint system on the outside)

As has been mentioned here before there are not many TRUE sub 50' passagemakers out there.. coastal cruising with a range of 1500/1700 miles there are a lot more boats that will fit. most of the time the boat you buy is related to what you can afford not what you really want.
I am helping the owner of the N57 run the boat to Mexico the first of December, I will add thoughts on the Nordhavn after the trip.

What boat will I buy... have not decided yet.. either a 45/47' single engine trawler or we night go back to sailing and get a 42/44' catamaran ..only time will tell

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Old 10-23-2012, 01:17 AM   #36
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I would have to say a custom built 50 foot raised pilothouse made of steel set up the systems I wanted. George Buehler has designed an 80 foot version of this boat for a customer while the one I have drawn up is 50 and very similar to his 80 footer and could be built for 500k. All of the Hatt LRC's I have seen have had DD4-71 or 4-53 engines in them and if I had to purchase an existing boat for the trip I would probably go with the Hatteras and strip and refit as needed.
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Old 10-23-2012, 02:53 AM   #37
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Sun-we have not as yet made a crossing-we have gone from Seattle to San Diego and back. Our longest run was 7 days and 6 nights. Once our daughter finishes high school in 4 years, we will be leaving the dirt for good. Plans are to go through the canal and eventually cross to the Med via Bermuda and the Azores. I do know at least 3 KKs that have made the Atlantic crossing, 2 58's and a 48. There is a 58 in the South Paciic now that left from the Canal late last year. Their intent is to go all the way around via South Africa. Not sure if a complete circumnav is on our bucket list, but at least getting to Europe definitely is. But, short or long trip, our boat, and the Krogen company, have been everything we expected it to be. And that is even with me doing almost all the work on it myself!
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Old 10-23-2012, 10:18 AM   #38
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Here is another great boat that would fit the bill nicely ! The 54 Krogen, not too many around but a beautiful boat.

1988 Krogen 54' Pilothouse Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com
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Old 10-23-2012, 10:19 AM   #39
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Great Discussion! Thanks for all the inputs. Let's keep it going - Lots of talk about hull material and seakeeping ability as one would expect with a circumnavigation scenario. What about a discussion on systems? Which systems on either the two options presented (or the several alternatives offered) would you consider to be beneficial for such a journey? Icemaker springs to mind Active stabs vs stab rig?
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Old 10-23-2012, 11:03 AM   #40
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Here is another great boat that would fit the bill nicely ! The 54 Krogen, not too many around but a beautiful boat.

1988 Krogen 54' Pilothouse Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

I like what they've done with the exterior teak.
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