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Old 03-18-2016, 07:03 PM   #1
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Need some pointers

So, here I am looking for some pointers from the more experienced

I'm thinking of buying a used powerboat, and I'm looking around for makers and models I would be interested in. The aim is to buy something that will last ages, with the ultimate goal to take it in a round the world trip with my better half. BTW: "Voyaging Under Power" is already on order.

The plan is to buy used. Hull in perfect conditions, interiors I'm fine if they are a bit less perfect as I plan to spend a couple of years customizing her. In the beginning, while working on it, we would use it mainly for coastal cruising. Budget, also taking into account the 10% to 20% annual repair costs that people keep mentioning, would be < $200K.

So I'm looking for a passage maker, slow but with a very good fuel economy, good livability for 2 (2 plus pets while coastal cruising), good carrying capabilities, single diesel engine, full displacement (?) boat, with stabilizers or the option to add them.

Based on my readings so far, the Kadey Krogen 42 seems to be a good fit, I've read a lot of positive things about it (and also a few things I should be checking for, like issues with the cored hull of pre-'92 models) and I actually like the lines.

So, my first questions are: is the KK42 actually a good fit for my needs? Are there any other makes/models I should be looking at?

The only thing I'm sure of at the moment is the name I'll give the boat, and that's where my username comes from
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Old 03-18-2016, 07:19 PM   #2
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What boating experience do you have up to this point?

I might be inclined to suggest that you buy a boat for your immediate needs and use that experience to inform your future decision.
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Old 03-18-2016, 07:35 PM   #3
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KK42 or take a look at Nordhavn which have done more passagemaking than any other brand. Also suggest you search yactworld.com without naming a brand but using your parameters as there are some capable custom or home built boats that tend to be less money due to lack of marketing pedigree
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Old 03-18-2016, 10:06 PM   #4
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What boating experience do you have up to this point?

I might be inclined to suggest that you buy a boat for your immediate needs and use that experience to inform your future decision.
I forgot to mention that. I have a fair amount of sailing experience (bar ocean crossing) but I'm new to motor boats.
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Old 03-18-2016, 10:12 PM   #5
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KK42 or take a look at Nordhavn which have done more passagemaking than any other brand. Also suggest you search yactworld.com without naming a brand but using your parameters as there are some capable custom or home built boats that tend to be less money due to lack of marketing pedigree
I looked at Nordhavn, then sort of ruled them out because albeit more expensive they seem to have less livable space. Might need to jump on one to see with my eyes...

I did try a search on yw.com, but not knowing a lot yet I feel I can't judge passage making capabilities by my self. Unless the seller stated he did cross an ocean on his custom made boat...
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Old 03-18-2016, 10:40 PM   #6
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take a look at Nordhavn
For less than $200,000!? Good luck with that.
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Old 03-19-2016, 06:49 AM   #7
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If you can accept the smaller room on board , perhaps a steel or GRP motorsailor would fit the World Cruiser bill better.

As you wander looking , don't exclude a real voyaging machine.

The hassle is few marine motorists require a vessel with true OCEAN sacntlings which can tripple the vessel cost.

Few are built as the demand is so slight.

Taking a wanna bee and beefing up window covers ,,storm ports is fine , but how do you reinforce the deckhouse to deck attachment?

Even smallish sail boats are built take a knock down , few motorboats.

Remember "trawler" describes the deck house style , and has no connection to Ocean Worthy.

In the USA steel boats are not well understood so command a lower resale price.

Canoe stern, bulbous bow 100% original spec steel.

Not really a M/S but if well built might be a start.

No Wood hull boat should be considered.
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Old 03-19-2016, 07:08 AM   #8
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Around the world eh? Try Yachtworld search for Boat Type +Motorsailer.
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Old 03-19-2016, 09:54 AM   #9
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If you can accept the smaller room on board , perhaps a steel or GRP motorsailor would fit the World Cruiser bill better.

As you wander looking , don't exclude a real voyaging machine.
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Around the world eh? Try Yachtworld search for Boat Type +Motorsailer.
That's another family of boats I'm not familiar with. I'm reading interesting thing though, and that would allow me to not give up sailing

Quote:
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The hassle is few marine motorists require a vessel with true OCEAN sacntlings which can tripple the vessel cost.

Few are built as the demand is so slight.

Taking a wanna bee and beefing up window covers ,,storm ports is fine , but how do you reinforce the deckhouse to deck attachment?

Even smallish sail boats are built take a knock down , few motorboats.

Remember "trawler" describes the deck house style , and has no connection to Ocean Worthy.

In the USA steel boats are not well understood so command a lower resale price.

Canoe stern, bulbous bow 100% original spec steel.

Not really a M/S but if well built might be a start.

No Wood hull boat should be considered.
Lot's of good points. Steel is also more resistant than fiberglass, which might turn out useful. Looking at prices it seems I might be able to overcome the smaller room onboard by buying a bigger/longer boat.

Also, besides the steel part, mentioning motorsailers got me thinking. What about multihulls? I won't find any made of steel, but... Price aside (haven't checked yet) they may offer more room, speed and possibly fuel economy, albeit with twin engines... Thoughts?
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Old 03-19-2016, 11:05 AM   #10
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While I prefer single screw boats, I'm not an Ocean crosser. Not overly concerned with irreparable engine failure do to my OCD maintenance regiment and costal cruising. If I was considering a circumnavigation with multiple Ocean crossings, think I would be focusing on the plan B propulsion options as I considered different makes and models. Some will be easier to retrofit than others.

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Old 03-19-2016, 11:17 AM   #11
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I would strongly suggest you charter some boats of various configurations, and that will inform what fits you best. Then you can seek boats that meet your checklist.
Speculation from strangers who have never been on a boat with you, don't know your experience, ability and likes/dislikes is virtually worthless.
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Old 03-19-2016, 11:32 AM   #12
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Charters are in the plan, yes. I'm just trying to see if I'm at least looking in the right direction by bouncing questions at people
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Old 03-19-2016, 11:46 AM   #13
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Need some pointers

There are two aspects to this. First do you REALLY want to cross oceans? Cause if you buy a boat and find out you don't like crossing oceans you might find out that you are trying to sell that boat in a far-away land. I know one couple who faced just that. It's hard enough selling a boat in your hometown. Second, we will all tell you what we like and don't like but you really need to get on some boats first. And try them out. Which is why the bareboat charter is such a good thing to do.

As far as ocean crossings go, you should try and crew with someone first. Maybe Richard is looking for someone? ;-)


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Old 03-19-2016, 11:52 AM   #14
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...and. While I really like the KK42 and they have crossed oceans, I'm not sure it would be my choice for doing so. I think if you want cheaper, you should be thinking about a sailboat.


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Old 03-19-2016, 09:42 PM   #15
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I used to run a lot and helped runners from around the world achieve their goals. Often I was approached by non-runners who wanted me to give them advice on how to train for a marathon. I would first suggest they start to run and see if they really like running, all the time, in all weather. Secondly, I would suggest they actually race shorter distances to see if they actually like racing. If they they did and found they like both training and racing, only then would I give them recommendations for training for a marathon.

I see the idea of ocean cruising as much the same.
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Old 03-19-2016, 10:08 PM   #16
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Perhaps I will be ejected for saying this, however I will take the risk;

Why anyone would risk their life and the life of an SO crossing an ocean in a small boat (power or sail) is beyond my comprehension. OK, I said it, and now I'll be quiet.
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Old 03-19-2016, 10:14 PM   #17
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Circumnavigation on a boat < $200K.

Google "decomposed German sailor found at sea"
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Old 03-19-2016, 10:23 PM   #18
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A few times above it's been suggested that you buy a boat to get used to boating then trade it up for a bigger one to do your long distance cruises.


I'm going to suggest a contrary opinion--Buy your second boat first.


By that I mean that you should skip the idea of buying a "training" boat then trading it in for your second boat. That gets very expensive and takes away from the cash you have to spend on your "second" boat.


I'd suggest you walk a lot of docks to look at a lot of boats. Talk to the owners and find out what they like about their boats and what they would do differently with their next boat. Take your time, do a lot of looking, make lists of what makes and models you like.


After you have done your homework THEN start looking seriously for your "second" boat.
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Old 03-19-2016, 11:16 PM   #19
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I'm going to suggest a contrary opinion--Buy your second boat first.
.
I have seen you make the same suggestion before, and I think the ideas behind that phrase make a lot of sense. Underlying that however is the assumption that the person already knows how they expect to use the boat. In the case of "hoping to go blue water cruising" but without much experience cruising at all, I wonder if they really know enough to buy that second boat first?

My wife and I bought a great sailboat for how we knew we would use the boat. My back eventually had other ideas so we are looking at "trawlers". Fortunately, our sailing experience helps inform our selection. Hopefully, the one we buy is our "second boat".
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Old 03-20-2016, 04:15 AM   #20
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I too like the idea of "buy your second boat first", but I also agree that $200k is unlikely to accomplish that. I think you need to double or triple that number to get what you describe. You could get a Nordhavn 46 or maybe a 50 in that range and have a capable ocean crosser.
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