Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 08-15-2018, 10:40 AM   #1
Veteran Member
 
SailorGreg's Avatar
 
City: Newport
Country: US
Vessel Name: Privateer
Vessel Model: Kadey Krogen 52
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 48
Nautical terms

Anybody know why it is called a “Portuguese Bridge”
__________________
Advertisement

SailorGreg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2018, 10:52 AM   #2
Guru
 
Lou_tribal's Avatar
 
City: Quebec
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Bleuvet
Vessel Model: Custom Built
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 2,977
Must be the same reason why we call “french door” or “french fries”

L
__________________

Lou_tribal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2018, 01:19 PM   #3
Guru
 
High Wire's Avatar
 
City: Cape May, NJ and Englewood, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Irish Lady
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,359
London bridge was taken?
__________________
Archie
1984 Monk 36 Hull #46
Englewood, FL and Cape May, NJ
High Wire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2018, 02:13 PM   #4
Veteran Member
 
SailorGreg's Avatar
 
City: Newport
Country: US
Vessel Name: Privateer
Vessel Model: Kadey Krogen 52
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 48
and this is the serious portion of the forum... I have a guy working on the boat and I sent him to the Portuguese bridge to pull some wires. He thought I was being funny since he is Portuguese. i promised I would find out why the name and came to the font of all trawler knowledge, or so I thought... maybe this is a bridge too far for you guys.
SailorGreg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2018, 02:41 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Nightsky's Avatar
 
City: Comox
Country: Canada
Vessel Model: 1994 Carver 390
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 218
If I had to guess (which I do, since I don't know the answer) I'd say because it was originally Portuguese tuna fishermen from San Diego or San Pedro that requested this outside bridge incorporated into the design of their tuna clippers.
Nightsky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2018, 02:44 PM   #6
Guru
 
Lou_tribal's Avatar
 
City: Quebec
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Bleuvet
Vessel Model: Custom Built
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 2,977
Quote:
Originally Posted by SailorGreg View Post
and this is the serious portion of the forum... I have a guy working on the boat and I sent him to the Portuguese bridge to pull some wires. He thought I was being funny since he is Portuguese. i promised I would find out why the name and came to the font of all trawler knowledge, or so I thought... maybe this is a bridge too far for you guys.
Humour, only humour but if you really want to keep it serious, here what I found from another forum:

Quote:
In the far ago days the rudder was controlled on the deck with a straight up right to left control "stick" coming up from below. This took up a space behind the captains position and required a cleared space to have the captains mate push this control from left to right(left was right rudder, right was left rudder) as ordered right across the "wheel house" No wheel was present , just this big piece of timber protruding from below. Its sometimes took a few good able bodies to push and pull the "stick". The "invention" was used on many Portuguese ships travelling cross Atlantic and beyond , but usually rounding the African Horn, and trading with Asian ports of call.
L
Lou_tribal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2018, 02:48 PM   #7
Guru
 
menzies's Avatar
 
City: Jacksonville
Country: USA
Vessel Name: SONAS
Vessel Model: Grand Alaskan 53
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 3,103
It has to do with transporting birds in the old days.

The British used to get their Chrismas goose from Holland. They would bring them across the Channel on boats. Since they were very dirty birds they did not want them inside the boat. So they built special coops for them at the front of the boat, right by the pilothouse so that they could keep an eye on them. They clipped their wings so they could not fly off.
Of course this is no longer done, but the port your geese design and name is still around.
menzies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2018, 02:54 PM   #8
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 7,155
Quote:
Originally Posted by menzies View Post
It has to do with transporting birds in the old days.

The British used to get their Chrismas goose from Holland. They would bring them across the Channel on boats. Since they were very dirty birds they did not want them inside the boat. So they built special coops for them at the front of the boat, right by the pilothouse so that they could keep an eye on them. They clipped their wings so they could not fly off.
Of course this is no longer done, but the port your geese design and name is still around.

I think we have a winner in the "Original" category.
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2018, 03:46 PM   #9
GFC
Guru
 
GFC's Avatar
 
City: Tri Cities, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Beachcomber
Vessel Model: Sea Ray 550 Sedan Bridge
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3,148
From Wikipedia....


A popular feature is a "Portuguese bridge", which consists of a walkway behind the foredeck, in front and to the sides of, the pilothouse windows, separated from the foredeck by a (generally) waist-high bulwark. The purpose of the bridge is to deflect green water from the foredeck up over the superstructure top rather than slamming against the forward windows of the pilothouse. It gives a semi-sheltered area outside the pilothouse while underway. A secondary benefit is that it provides a "safe area" or handhold when it is necessary to be on the foredeck in inclement weather. And lastly, it provides additional storage space for lines, fire extinguisher, spare anchor, drogue, etc., if the builder has provided access doors and lockers on the inside of the bridge.


The term comes from the Portuguese sailor Antonio Delagausta whose Portuguese Water Dog "Matador" was washed off the deck of Antonio's trawler in a heavy storm. Antonio was so distraught that he got rid of his boat and created a design where there was a walkway forward of the helm where a dog could safely be in a storm.
__________________
Mike and Tina
Beachcomber 1995 Sea Ray 550 Sedan Bridge
GFC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2018, 03:47 PM   #10
Guru
 
City: Satsuma FL/Daytona Beach Shores
Country: United States
Vessel Name: No Mo Trawla
Vessel Model: Hurricane SS188
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 2,018
Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by menzies View Post
It has to do with transporting birds in the old days.

The British used to get their Chrismas goose from Holland. They would bring them across the Channel on boats. Since they were very dirty birds they did not want them inside the boat. So they built special coops for them at the front of the boat, right by the pilothouse so that they could keep an eye on them. They clipped their wings so they could not fly off.
Of course this is no longer done, but the port your geese design and name is still around.

Well, you have accounted for the British and the Dutch but what about the Portuguese?
__________________
Buffalo Bluff Light 28
Donsan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2018, 03:47 PM   #11
GFC
Guru
 
GFC's Avatar
 
City: Tri Cities, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Beachcomber
Vessel Model: Sea Ray 550 Sedan Bridge
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3,148
And if you believe the second paragraph in my post above, which could only be described as "Fake News", you are far too gullible to own a boat.


Now let's all go boating.
__________________
Mike and Tina
Beachcomber 1995 Sea Ray 550 Sedan Bridge
GFC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2018, 04:00 PM   #12
Guru
 
Sailor of Fortune's Avatar
 
City: Saint Augustine, Fl.
Country: Port of St Augustine ,FL
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 2,333
Always been the front walkway around pilothouse. Very useful to get out with binocs and verify targets,contacts and scenery. Can't imagine why anyone would have a problem with that terminology....Not derogatory as far as I can tell..
__________________
Jack (Steve?)
Sailor of Fortune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2018, 04:06 PM   #13
Guru
 
AlaskaProf's Avatar
 
City: Tacoma, WA & Ashland, OR
Country: US of A
Vessel Name: SEEADLER
Vessel Model: RAWSON 41
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 688
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightsky View Post
I'd say because it was originally Portuguese tuna fishermen from San Diego or San Pedro...tuna clippers
Quite plausible. I used to work in rural Marin County, where many of the dairy farmers were Portuguese; they created the "Porta'gee Gate".

BTW a number of those big California tuna seiners are now in Alaska, where they are banned by law from fishing so they serve as cannery tenders. There a couple just down the dock here in Ketchikan. I'll try to post a picture later.
AlaskaProf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2018, 04:25 PM   #14
Guru
 
Fletcher500's Avatar
 
City: So-Cal
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Helmsman 43 PH
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 847
There are a few left in SD but they are transient and often on a lay over in a spot called Tuna Harbor. There are some work boats left. If you meet someone of Portegese descent who live here, there is often a family connection to the fishery.
Fletcher500 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2018, 05:01 PM   #15
Guru
 
AlaskaProf's Avatar
 
City: Tacoma, WA & Ashland, OR
Country: US of A
Vessel Name: SEEADLER
Vessel Model: RAWSON 41
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 688
Tuna Clipper with Portuguese bridge (and fish pump) in Ketchikan:
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000997.jpg
Views:	61
Size:	58.8 KB
ID:	79732   Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000998.jpg
Views:	70
Size:	63.2 KB
ID:	79733  
AlaskaProf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2018, 05:03 PM   #16
Guru
 
AlaskaProf's Avatar
 
City: Tacoma, WA & Ashland, OR
Country: US of A
Vessel Name: SEEADLER
Vessel Model: RAWSON 41
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 688
A celebrity sighting in Ketchikan today:
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	P1000999.JPG
Views:	66
Size:	181.8 KB
ID:	79734  
AlaskaProf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2018, 08:08 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
City: Lakeland
Country: United States
Vessel Model: Looking for the next one
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by menzies View Post
It has to do with transporting birds in the old days.

The British used to get their Chrismas goose from Holland. They would bring them across the Channel on boats. Since they were very dirty birds they did not want them inside the boat. So they built special coops for them at the front of the boat, right by the pilothouse so that they could keep an eye on them. They clipped their wings so they could not fly off.
Of course this is no longer done, but the port your geese design and name is still around.

Well done, sir!
JohnEasley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2018, 11:11 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
rclarke246's Avatar
 
City: Florida
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Lady Di
Vessel Model: 2012 Beneteau Swift Trawler 44
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 385
So, the Portugese Bridge is the open area immediately forward of the pilot house?
rclarke246 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2018, 12:53 PM   #19
Guru
 
Tom.B's Avatar
 
City: Cary, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Skinny Dippin'
Vessel Model: Navigator 4200 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,523
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhays View Post
I think we have a winner in the "Original" category.

I dunno... The London Bridge one was pretty original too. :-)
__________________
2000 Navigator 4200 Classic
(NOT a trawler)
Tom.B is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2018, 01:31 PM   #20
Guru
 
Fletcher500's Avatar
 
City: So-Cal
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Helmsman 43 PH
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 847
I wonder why the TB is not on the latest episodes of DC? The Hillstrand brothers were fun to watch.
__________________

Fletcher500 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:56 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012