Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-28-2014, 12:31 PM   #21
Guru
 
Tony B's Avatar
 
City: Joe Wheeler State Park, Al
Country: Cruising/Live-Aboard USA
Vessel Name: Serenity
Vessel Model: Mainship 36 Dual Cabin -1986
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,250
Great Job

Nice work Kev.
I think poly was the best choice - very repairable, just sand and recoat.
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
Cruising the Eastern U.S. Inland Waterways and Gulf Coast. Presently on the ICW in Louisiana and heading Back to Texas.
Tony B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2014, 12:32 PM   #22
TF Site Team
 
ksanders's Avatar
 
City: SEWARD ALASKA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: LISAS WAY
Vessel Model: BAYLINER 4788
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,956
Quote:
Originally Posted by RT Firefly View Post
Greetings,
Mr. k. Sweeettt! I wasn't sure how the corners would turn out but they appear to be A-1. Just had a thought....How about cup holders with cups UNDER each corner and very small cues? Could be a nautical version of Beer Pong, Rum Pong, Grog Pong........ Beer pong - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
I anticipate a VERY interesting outcome if you're waked.
Thanks!

I actually thought allot about cup holders. The thought would be to add a slide out, thin piece of teak to the sides that has a hole drilled in it for a tapered cup. I saw a photo of a setup like that and thought it looked great!

Then reality set in...
90% of the time we drink out of water bottles. In the evening we have a glass of wine or a beer. The wine might fit in a tapered cup, but not a beer bottle. Then I thought of a actual cup holder, either a insert of something a few inches thick made from teak. The problem with that idea is you'll hit your knees on it when its not in use.

I have a great idea for teak water bottle holders. Think of a teak box, made of say 1/2" thick stock probably 4" high to put a water bottle in. Possibly with some weright added to the bottom. You could for example use some lead encased in resin in the bottom to make it more bottom heavy.

Glue some felt to the bottom, or little rubber "feet" available at lowes and you'd have a pretty nifty and effective cup/water bottle holder.
__________________

__________________
Kevin Sanders
Bayliner 4788
Seward, Alaska
www.mvlisasway.com
ksanders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2014, 12:36 PM   #23
TF Site Team
 
ksanders's Avatar
 
City: SEWARD ALASKA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: LISAS WAY
Vessel Model: BAYLINER 4788
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,956
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony B View Post
Nice work Kev.
I think poly was the best choice - very repairable, just sand and recoat.
Thanks Tony!

I actually did a teat on a oiled piece of teak yeaterday. I set a icewater filled glass on a piece of oiled teak and let a water ring form.

The water ring is now permenant. I thought it might dissappear as the wood dried out but thats not the case.
__________________
Kevin Sanders
Bayliner 4788
Seward, Alaska
www.mvlisasway.com
ksanders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2014, 02:31 PM   #24
Guru
 
healhustler's Avatar
 
City: Longboat Key, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bucky
Vessel Model: Krogen Manatee 36 North Sea
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 4,181
You gotta lot of nerve having a project come out like that and then sayin you're not a carpenter. How will the table be fastened underneath....double pedestal?
__________________
Larry

"I'd rather be happy than dignified".
healhustler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2014, 04:42 PM   #25
TF Site Team
 
ksanders's Avatar
 
City: SEWARD ALASKA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: LISAS WAY
Vessel Model: BAYLINER 4788
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,956
Quote:
Originally Posted by healhustler View Post
You gotta lot of nerve having a project come out like that and then sayin you're not a carpenter. How will the table be fastened underneath....double pedestal?

Thanks! I'm an electrical and electronics person by trade

The existing table has a alumanium pedestal style mount. I'll just ubscrew the old one and screw this one on.

As long as I dont use too long of screws I'll be good to go
__________________
Kevin Sanders
Bayliner 4788
Seward, Alaska
www.mvlisasway.com
ksanders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2014, 05:11 PM   #26
Scraping Paint
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Vessel Model: CHB 48 Zodiac YL 4.2
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,804
Quote:
Originally Posted by RT Firefly View Post
Just had a thought....How about cup holders with cups UNDER each corner and very small cues?

Then you would need to mount it on one of these ...

RickB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2014, 04:35 PM   #27
TF Site Team
 
ksanders's Avatar
 
City: SEWARD ALASKA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: LISAS WAY
Vessel Model: BAYLINER 4788
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,956
Well, here's an update and a lesson learned on my table.

The next day after my 6th thin coat of spray on minwax polyurethane I was suprised to find the finish, while looking nice was gummy.

I was to say the least unimpressed with this. It felt dry to the touch but when I tried to lightly sand it to put on a final coat it gummed up.

So, I took a handy scotchbrite pad soaked in laquer thinner and removed that stuff. It took all of less than an hour and I had my nice table back down to wood.

Well, after some very light sanding I headed to the local store for something better than minwax polyurethane.

Remember my options in Wasilla, Alaska are fairly limited, but I was able to find some old fashioned real varnish, made by a company called Cabot.

Guys, that varnish made the world of difference. I put one good coat on the table a day for three days, sanding with 220 grit in between. With three coats i now have the table I always wanted. The Varnish is 100% stunning.

Steve and others, you taught me a valuable lesson, and I'm glad for your advice, and glad my table didn't have to pay the price for my learning.

Thanks very much
__________________
Kevin Sanders
Bayliner 4788
Seward, Alaska
www.mvlisasway.com
ksanders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2014, 04:40 PM   #28
Guru
 
healhustler's Avatar
 
City: Longboat Key, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bucky
Vessel Model: Krogen Manatee 36 North Sea
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 4,181
Wow, Kev. In the end, a "conventional" product came through. I'm listening.
__________________
Larry

"I'd rather be happy than dignified".
healhustler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2014, 09:33 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
Datenight's Avatar
 
City: Noank, CT
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Datenight
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 415
Kevin,

In my flooring business life I have never liked Minwax urethane. I have had good luck with everything else Zip Guard, Lasts and Lasts, Hard as Nails, Fabulon and what my supplier carries, Lenmar. There are others but I can't remember them all. On the other hand, I swear by Minwax stains.

A lot of the newer waterborn finishes are very good also. They will not give the golden hue of urethane but you can apply several coats per day.

Can't wait to see the finished product.

Rob
__________________
North Pacific 39
Datenight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2014, 09:38 PM   #30
TF Site Team
 
Pack Mule's Avatar
 
City: Paris,TN
Country: USA
Vessel Name: William
Vessel Model: Outer reef 32
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 2,502
I have had some bad experience with polyurethane myself. I think that poly has changed some lately . I built a walnut bookcase this summer and tried poly myself and had the same results . I think that it has a tendency to dry on top to soon and not get dry underneath .I had to take it all off and start over and thin the poly for every coat. Also the natural oil that is in teak doesn't help either. I thinking on raw teak it might be best to put a couple thinned coats of epoxy before starting the varnish. I have had better results with the wipe on poly ,but for teak I think varnish gives the best results.
Pack Mule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2014, 11:54 PM   #31
TF Site Team
 
Peter B's Avatar
 
City: Brisbane
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Lotus
Vessel Model: Clipper (CHB) 34 Sedan/Europa style
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 6,669
Send a message via Skype™ to Peter B
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksanders View Post
Well guys I decided to go with polyurethane.

I also decided to go with plain old spray on gloss minwax polyurethane. There might be a better "marine" product and I'm sure there is, but I've used this stuff before and it works really well.

All of the maple trim in my house, and all of the maple faced doors are finished with it, and, well they've held up pretty darn well.

That and it was something I could go to Home Depot and actually buy, vs taking a day to drive to Anchorage.

So, I sprayed four light coats so far, leaving about an hour in between coats. I'll spray a couple more tonight and let it set for a few days and see what I want to do next.

I'm thinking after that it'll be a light sanding with say 600 grit, or with a scotch bright pad then I'll put another one or two finish coats on.

Here's what it looks like thus far. Rememvber this was one solid board on Saturday morning

Works for me...
__________________
Pete
Peter B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2014, 12:35 AM   #32
TF Site Team
 
ksanders's Avatar
 
City: SEWARD ALASKA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: LISAS WAY
Vessel Model: BAYLINER 4788
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,956
Thanks guys

In a photo, the table top probably looks just like did in the last photos. I wish I could but I'mtraveling, and not near my table top to take any more photos for a couple of weeks.

The problem with the polyurethane wasnt its looks, it was its performance.

I'm guessing that spraying on a coat or two on a piece of trim is far different than laying down 6 coats on a table top.

This was my first time working with old fashioned Varnish. What I did was to thin by 50% the first coat, then use full strength for the remaining coats.

What I found was that Varnish flowed very nicely, making it pretty much self leveling. It fully dried overnight, making next day sanding a breeze.

Something that photos cant show is that the varnish builds up very quickly making a very thick, deep looking finish.
__________________
Kevin Sanders
Bayliner 4788
Seward, Alaska
www.mvlisasway.com
ksanders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2014, 12:42 AM   #33
TF Site Team
 
Peter B's Avatar
 
City: Brisbane
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Lotus
Vessel Model: Clipper (CHB) 34 Sedan/Europa style
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 6,669
Send a message via Skype™ to Peter B
Sounds/looks great. Don't touch it any more - might spoil a good thing. Enough is enough, as they say...
__________________
Pete
Peter B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2014, 02:12 AM   #34
TF Site Team
 
FlyWright's Avatar
 
City: California Delta and SF Bay
Country: Sacramento, CA, USA (boat in Vallejo)
Vessel Name: FlyWright
Vessel Model: Marshall Californian 34 LRC
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 10,184
Have you considered adding more than 3 coats? Some varnish experts advise as many as 8-10 coats.

Here's a link with lots of good varnish advice.
__________________
Al

Custom Google Trawler Forum Search
FlyWright is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2014, 06:08 AM   #35
Guru
 
timjet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,905
Kevin, Very nice job. I am an amateur woodworker myself so I can appreciate the work you put into this. Since buying my boat almost 4 year ago I've not done much wood working, it's a skill that needs to be practiced.

I've got a couple of questions:
Did you consider instead of notching the top to accept the raised sides perhaps finding some wood that would closely match the gain of the top and gluing the routed side on top and to achieve the thickness a similar piece on the bottom. My guess is you wanted the perfect look of no seams so you went with a solid piece.
That leads to my next question; How did you cut the notches out of the top? I would think a band saw or jig saw would not cut straight enough to get the tight fit you did. I'm talking about the fit at the corners, I know the length was over lapped by the routing.

Finishing is not my strong point. I bet it took some time getting the poly out of the joints especially where the top meets the raised edges. Did you spray on the varnish?

I've been thinking of doing the same thing to my boat. My current table is topped with plastic laminate that matches the galley counters. It looks OK, but a table like yours would really make it POP.

Many years ago I made a jewelry box with an inlay. That's what I envision when making my top. The inlay is bought and glued into the top and sanded smooth. The technique I got from an issue of Woodsmith magazine probably 25 years ago.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	P1050393.JPG
Views:	63
Size:	97.2 KB
ID:	26996  
__________________
Tim
Tampa Bay
Carver 355 ACMY Twin Cummins Diesels Sold
timjet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2014, 09:15 AM   #36
TF Site Team
 
ksanders's Avatar
 
City: SEWARD ALASKA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: LISAS WAY
Vessel Model: BAYLINER 4788
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,956
Quote:
Originally Posted by timjet View Post
Kevin, Very nice job. I am an amateur woodworker myself so I can appreciate the work you put into this. Since buying my boat almost 4 year ago I've not done much wood working, it's a skill that needs to be practiced.

I've got a couple of questions:
Did you consider instead of notching the top to accept the raised sides perhaps finding some wood that would closely match the gain of the top and gluing the routed side on top and to achieve the thickness a similar piece on the bottom. My guess is you wanted the perfect look of no seams so you went with a solid piece.

That leads to my next question; How did you cut the notches out of the top? I would think a band saw or jig saw would not cut straight enough to get the tight fit you did. I'm talking about the fit at the corners, I know the length was over lapped by the routing.

Finishing is not my strong point. I bet it took some time getting the poly out of the joints especially where the top meets the raised edges. Did you spray on the varnish?

I've been thinking of doing the same thing to my boat. My current table is topped with plastic laminate that matches the galley counters. It looks OK, but a table like yours would really make it POP.

Many years ago I made a jewelry box with an inlay. That's what I envision when making my top. The inlay is bought and glued into the top and sanded smooth. The technique I got from an issue of Woodsmith magazine probably 25 years ago.

First off that is a very nice inlay!! I dont know how to do that.

As far as the notches, I didnt want the seams, and I wanted the grain to match so I went with the notches in the top. Gluing up the top from three pieces would have been easier though.

I started to cut the notches out with my router table, thinking I'd finish them up with the band saw, but quickly realized that the only bit I had that would do that was dull, so I used the band saw.

As you indicated bandsaws are imperfect, so at the corners I hand fitted the inserts using a file to do the final shaping to a sample piece with the correct notches. (remember there is a dado in the side pieces). Then it was as easy as very carefully cutting the side pieces to the correct length, as there is NO margin for error on the side pieces length wise.

In hind sight I probably could have routed in some overlap at the corners of the side pieces if I thought that part out more. That would have made final fitting easier, as that part took a couple hours.

Also in hind sight I could have used the router table free hand to ease the edges of the corners of the main piece. I was afraid of doing that since its free hand work with the only safety being the ball bearing guide on the router bit. I did this by hand using a vibrating sander.

Getting the poly off was easyer than I expected. There were a couple of corners I had to scrape, but it wasnt cured so the laquer thinner disolved it into mush very quickly.
__________________
Kevin Sanders
Bayliner 4788
Seward, Alaska
www.mvlisasway.com
ksanders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2014, 09:17 AM   #37
TF Site Team
 
ksanders's Avatar
 
City: SEWARD ALASKA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: LISAS WAY
Vessel Model: BAYLINER 4788
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,956
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyWright View Post
Have you considered adding more than 3 coats? Some varnish experts advise as many as 8-10 coats.

Here's a link with lots of good varnish advice.
I have thought about adding more varnish, and will be looking at that when I get home. It looks pretty thick though.

We'll just have to see.
__________________
Kevin Sanders
Bayliner 4788
Seward, Alaska
www.mvlisasway.com
ksanders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2014, 12:40 PM   #38
Guru
 
Scary's Avatar
 
City: Walnut Grove Ca
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Cary'D Away
Vessel Model: Hatteras 48 LRC
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 884
The reason behind 8 to 10 coats of Varnish build

Many boat finishers are reluctant to use wood filler to level the surface of open grain woods like teak and mahogany. The filler dulls the grain and in my opinion loses grain definition. The multiple coats give you enough varnish thickness to sand down to a perfectly smooth surface filling the open grain. The net finish really is only 3-4 coats after sanding.
If you use a penetrating epoxy first, you seal the wood and partially fill the grain. This reduces the number of coats varnish need to flatten the grain. It also tends to reduce black staining in the future from neglected varnish jobs.
In my area Captains varnish is popular with professionals because it can be sanded sooner allowing us to apply repeat coats in the same day. It is not as durable as Epithane.
If you are satisfied with your current results, there is no need to add more finish to your table if used in your interior of your pilot house.
The table looks great, an improvement over the stock setup for sure.
Scary is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2014, 01:01 PM   #39
TF Site Team
 
FlyWright's Avatar
 
City: California Delta and SF Bay
Country: Sacramento, CA, USA (boat in Vallejo)
Vessel Name: FlyWright
Vessel Model: Marshall Californian 34 LRC
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 10,184
Thanks, Steve. That makes sense.
__________________

__________________
Al

Custom Google Trawler Forum Search
FlyWright is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:31 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012